Browsing All posts tagged under »Virginia«

“Submission is Ruin.”

April 10, 2011 by


I’ll let a pro-secession paper in Virginia speak for itself… Nothing could be more preposterous, nothing more stupid, than the dogma that slavery is a curse to the country. On the contrary, the heaviest calamity that could befall any slave State on this continent, the greatest curse that an angry Providence could inflict upon the […]

Where were the rights of the people under the new Confederacy?

April 7, 2011 by


No right to choose constitutions and laws is to be extended to the people. Their masters, the politicians, in the Southern Confederacy, did not even allow them to vote for President and Vice President. These secession politicians are afraid of the vote of the people. The restraints thrown upon their ambition for office and the […]

A quest to know more about my Virginia ancestor who spoke out against secession

April 3, 2011 by


As I mentioned yesterday, after posting a few items focused on anti-secession rhetoric in Virginia (during this time of the year, 150 years ago) this past week, I began thinking again about an ancestor of mine who also spoke out against secession at this same time. John Shuler (1815-1908) was a well-to-do farmer in Grove […]

An observation – Civil War in Virginia Month… chirp, chirp chirp…

April 2, 2011 by


Today IS April 2, and that chirping would be the sound of crickets in the absence of a proclamation, as yet, by Governor Bob McDonnell. Yet, despite the proposed redirection toward a “Civil War in Virginia Month” (formerly known as Confederate History Month/CHM), the CHM recognition continues by many who are inclined to continue in […]

“Secession Intollerance”

April 1, 2011 by


The Staunton Spectator (March 26, 1861) reflects on a piece from the Petersburg Intelligencer: The intolerance of the immediate Secessionists, is without precedent in Virginia history. All men must think as they think, and act as they act, or suffer the penalty of being denounced as traitors to Virginia and Virginia’s institutions. As for ourselves, […]

John B. Baldwin on the threatened right(s?) of Virginians

March 31, 2011 by


From the Virginia Convention, Thursday, March 21, 1861… we catch Mr. Baldwin in the middle of his presentation to the members of the Convention (as documented by someone present)… She [Augusta County] was identified with every interest of the Commonwealth; and if there were extremes of opinion or prejudice in one quarter or another, Augusta […]

A reason why Virginians might fear an alignment with the “Northern Confederacy”

March 29, 2011 by


From the Staunton Vindicator, March 29, 1861: Mr. Bennett, one of the financial officers of the State [Virginia], has already called for an increase of 20 cents in the one hundred dollars on the present rate of taxation. If the policy of the submissionists is adopted, and Virginia becomes a part of the Northern Confederacy, her […]

Protect slavery or face “degredation and ruin.”

March 29, 2011 by


Looking back 150 years ago, from the Shenandoah Valley… this comes from the Staunton Vindicator, March 29, 1861… The question is not “Union”. That is irretrievably, hopelessly broken up. No compromise of right–no palliation of wrong, or denunciation of its resistance, can restore its fallen columns. Nor can past glory reconcile to a future of degradation. The only […]

Were Virginia’s Confederate Reserves a smokescreen of deception?

March 23, 2011 by


I’m really jumping the gun here, because I should be holding this story in reserve (sure, why not… pun intended) until 2014… marking the 150th anniversary of the establishment of Virginia’s Confederate reserve units. Still, I brought it up the other day (in “WYSIWYG Confederates?”) , so I figured that I would pick-up from where […]

Submariner’s remembrance…

March 13, 2011 by


I’m slightly distracted today… for a number of reasons… so, I’m going to deviate slightly from the standard content here… and yes, I’ll be getting back to the story I started yesterday. I pitched an idea to fellow submariners today (on FaceBook), thinking it would be interesting to learn not just about the boats lost, […]

In search of… the grave of a slaveholder, killed by his slaves

March 12, 2011 by


Just a quick note this morning, before I head out. Among the things I have on the calendar for today is a visit to a cemetery. This isn’t just an ordinary cemetery, but one in which rests a slaveholder who was killed (February 14, 1842) by two of his slaves (“Captain” and “Martin”). I visited […]

Remember the Alamo! 175 years ago today.

March 6, 2011 by


There was, indeed, a Robert Moore in the Alamo when it fell, 175 years ago today. I remember reading his name on the list of those lost there, when I visited that sacred ground in Texas, a few years ago. I doubt that the Alamo’s Robert B. Moore is any relation(*), but he was born […]

John Minor Botts reflects on his “crimes” against the Confederacy

February 28, 2011 by


  In the wake of my post, yesterday, at Southern Unionists Chronicles (and recalling the suspension of habeas corpus and declaration of martial law, under the administration of Confederate President Jefferson Davis)…   An Interesting Document – Why John Minor Botts was Imprisoned. From the Richmond Republic. [as reprinted in the January 22, 1866 edition […]

Southern by the grace of cornbread!

February 23, 2011 by


Thinking about Craig’s post from the other day, I remembered something I’ve been meaning to post about cornbread… yes, cornbread. Now cornbread has become known as something distinctly “Southron”, but appears to  have origins with the Native People of what is now the southeastern U.S. (references vary, but among those suggested as originators are the […]

The Vindicator addresses the Spectator’s “doing harm” piece

February 15, 2011 by


From the Republican Vindicator, February 15, 1861, in response to the piece I mentioned, =>here: The Spectator The Spectator, seeking an excuse to compliment its editor in the last issue of that paper, says it “understood that some of the extremists in this and the adjoining counties say that the Staunton Spectator is doing more […]

“What Can Virginia Do?”

February 9, 2011 by


From the secession-leaning Staunton Vindicator, February 8, 1861… 150 years ago yesterday… The return so far received from the election on Monday last, show that a majority of “Union” candidates have been chosen over their “Secession” opponents. The complete returns from the State will not be received in time for publication in our issue of […]

Newspapers that reveal something new to popular memory of the Civil War… perhaps…

February 6, 2011 by


Once again (as can be seen in my post from Friday), I’ve been perusing the Valley of the Shadow site. My focus in that post on Friday was on the two papers in Staunton, Virginia, at this particular time (the first week of February), 150 years ago. One of those papers happened to support secession, […]

An amazing family discovery

February 5, 2011 by


Going to divert focus here for just a bit; the reason being a recent unique find pertaining to my ancestry. Before I spill the beans, I figure I better set the stage. About 17 years ago, I started learning about another branch of my family tree… the McKinney and Quigley family lines. After growing up […]

Virginia newspapers “doing harm” to sentiments of disunion

February 4, 2011 by


As Ron Baumgarten pointed out in his post the other day over at “All Not So Quiet on the Potomac”, today marks the 150th anniversary of Virginians voting for delegates to the Virginia Convention of 1861. By the time of the vote, seven states from the deep South had seceded; Texas being the most recent, […]

Yes, Page County, you once had slaves…

January 16, 2011 by


While the audience of this blog is typically from well beyond the boundaries of my home county (and, I’m happy to say, even beyond the confines of this continent), I frequently look back to that place, as I have spent a considerable number of years writing about its history. No doubt, it’s fascinating to me […]

Finding Lieutenant Metz…

January 5, 2011 by


Some folks might not have an appreciation for it, but… while researching, writing, and battlefield walking is a lot of fun, grave-hunting can also be a rewarding way to enjoy the history of the Civil War. Sure, you hear about people going to major cemeteries like Hollywood, Arlington, etc., etc., but how many are willing […]

One site, multiple angles for interpretation

December 19, 2010 by


One of my favorite historic sites in Page County, Virginia is Catherine’s Furnace. Because of efforts made in the early 2000s, the site has one Virginia Civil War Trails marker. I was fortunate to be involved in deciding that the site merited a marker, and I also wrote the text and provided images for the […]

Was it that the farthest parts of western Virginia didn’t feel threatened?

December 18, 2010 by


Was it… the right to own slaves, without interference… or… “States’ rights”? When it all boils down, what do we see? Let’s visualize slavery in Virginia, in 1860. From The Secession Movement in Virginia, 1847-1861 (1934), by Henry T. Shanks. When it comes down to what portions of Virginia did and did not secede, is […]

On the notion that emancipation would eventually come in a free and independent Southern Confederacy

December 12, 2010 by


With the title of this post in mind… this editorial comes from the Staunton Vindicator, December 14, 1860 (courtesy the Valley of the Shadow site). Now, I realize, as an editorial, it is, or may be, just one man’s opinion, but, there appear to be reflections of the attitudes of others. I’ve placed emphasis in […]

Willa Cather’s Civil War Heritage

December 8, 2010 by


I’m a huge fan of Writer’s Almanac, partly because it’s a great audio morsel that brings back hints of a time long gone, and partly because I’ve enjoyed listening to Garrison Keillor on Prairie Home Companion for years.  Additionally, I enjoy the closing remark, and find it encouraging at the beginning of the work day… […]

Goodhart on “States’ Rights”

December 5, 2010 by


Some readers might already be familiar with the story of the Loudoun Rangers… but, just in case… in short, they were Virginia’s only organized Union unit (though many a Virginian joined Union units from other states). Briscoe Goodhart was a member of Company A. In his History of the Independent Loudoun Virginia Rangers, Goodhart wrote […]

More on Southerners who relocated to the North and joined the Union army

November 17, 2010 by


So, in the wake of Sunday’s post, I’ve been thinking. As I pointed out, the Mill Creek Baptist Church in Page County, Virginia split in 1805 over the issue of slavery. In the wake of that split, I’m curious about how many of the children of those people involved, who went to Ohio, ended up […]

How all Northerners “then” weren’t really so out of touch with “being Southern”

November 14, 2010 by


It’s bad enough to hear some contemporary Southerners speak of Northerners as if it was still the time of the Civil War, but it’s even worse to hear Southerners speak of the people of the North from the time of the war, as if they could not, in the least bit, identify with the culture […]

An execution… a ghost’s last hymn… and a curse fulfilled(?)

October 31, 2010 by


As I’ve mentioned several times in my postings throughout the month, October brings to mind stories of witches and ghosts, but one ghost story captures my thinking frequently throughout the month. I suppose, one can almost say that it literally “haunts” me. The story actually developed over time, with each piece of information I uncovered […]

An undertaker and his ghostly client

October 30, 2010 by


On two separate occasions, Page News and Courier columnist Jacob R. Seekford wrote of an account of an undertaker and his encounter with a ghost. The first mention of this was in 1930 and the second was in 1937. It is interesting to note that the story got a little better with age. The story […]


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