Browsing All posts tagged under »Page County«

Maryland and “the despot’s heel”

January 8, 2010 by


The deeper I get into the history of events in central and western Maryland, the more I am convinced that the “despot’s heel” argument really holds little weight. Not only is the state song out of date, it never really reflected the Civil War era opinion of the state as a whole. What prompted today’s […]

The 1860 Presidential vote in Washington County, Maryland

October 24, 2009 by


As you may recall from my post from the other day, there was discussion about “Black Republicanism” playing a factor in the sweeping display of Unionism in the Clear Spring District. I mentioned in the same post, however, that only two votes were casts in the Clear Spring District for Lincoln. With that in mind, […]

Confederate ancestor analysis #3 – Joseph Richards

September 2, 2009 by


Joseph Richards was born in 1833 (the third of seven children) to Aquilla and “Millie” Keyser Richards. Aquilla was of Welsh descent (the family having entered Pennsylvania in the late 1600s/early 1700s), while Millie was of German and English ancestry. In the 1850 census, after the death of his father, Aquilla (ca. 1804-ca. 1849), Joseph, […]

Confederate ancestor analysis #1 – Garnett Nicholson

June 25, 2009 by


Garnett Nicholson is one of my third great grandfathers. He was a private in Company B (Capt. Jason C. Crigler’s Company), Eighty-second Virginia Militia. The Eighty-second was primarily from Madison County and was under the command of Col. James W. Twyman. As with most of Virginia’s militia regiments, the Eighty-second was called into active service […]

A white man remembers slavery in the Shenandoah Valley

February 3, 2009 by


I was wondering if I could interest the present generation by giving them a little of the history of antebellum days of slavery and how some things were done in by-gone days – things that I know did really happen. Now all I shall tell of will be done without doing violence to the truth […]

A Confederate monument… and keeping the peace in one community

January 5, 2009 by


In the early 1900s, many Confederate veterans of Page County, Virginia (most of whom were probably members of the Rosser-Gibbons Camp, U.C.V.) decided to erect a monument to the memory of the county’s Confederate soldiers. Up to that time, “The Confederate Heroes Monument” was the sole Confederate monument standing in Luray. Sculpted by Herbert Barbee, […]

Another form of Civil War “Memory”

December 31, 2008 by


I thoroughly enjoy taking this… … and coming up with this… Name: Konoginsky, Gustave (or Gustav) Unit: 41st New York Infantry, Company A Circumstances of death: MWIA 6/8/62, Battle of Cross Keys Date of Death: 6/12/62 Age: 19 Pensions received (widow/mother, etc.) based on his service: None (though 80 out of his company received pensions). … […]

Account of Christmas Dancing in Page County, 1864

December 24, 2008 by


As a part of “trimming the blogs” today, over at Avenue of Armies, I just tossed in a short story of a rather busy Christmas dance circuit in Page County during the winter of 1864. The virtual snow against the black backdrop looks nice over there, though not quite as much impact as with the snow photo […]

Civil War “forgetfulness?” Ummm, sure… so “where did the love go?”

December 1, 2008 by


Noting a remark in a post made on Richard William’s blog that demonstrates Richard’s belief that saying “Civil War ‘forgetfulness'” is more appropriate than saying “Civil War ‘memory'” (I would argue that both “forgetfulness” and “memory” have valid places in understanding the way people reflect on the war, but that will come in another post), something came to mind. […]

In an effort to separate fact from fiction

November 15, 2008 by


Just shifting gears a bit this evening and focusing on the complications of Civil War-era memory at the level of a small community. By no means is the following some earth-shattering historical finding, but I use it here to give an example of how we should take care in interpreting what we read… and what is […]

Are you sure your Confederate ancestor even wanted to be a Confederate?

November 1, 2008 by


On average, very few of us know what our ancestors actually thought regarding events within their own time. Regretfully, because of this some researchers begin to speculate because they want some sort of definitive explanation behind what they do find in their research. “Gray” or indefinite history is simply not acceptable to some, so there […]

A Tale for Halloween

October 31, 2008 by


Among the many stories that I gathered while conducting research for my thesis, there was one that caught my attention for more than one reason. I used a portion of the story for my thesis, as it was useful in documenting the activities of Confederate conscript hunters. The part that I did not use is […]

Can “The Burning” in the Shenandoah Valley be considered “total war?”

October 29, 2008 by


I just read Chris Wehner’s most recent post, American Civil War Educators Teaching Myths, at Blog 4 History, and was particularly interested in the remark about Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. Without a doubt, the devastation left in the wake of Gen. Philip Sheridan’s move through the Valley in late September and early October 1864 was […]

Historial analysis and the example of the Haynes-Beylor Murder

October 25, 2008 by


I’ll say it again… the Haynes-Beylor story as I first posted it, if I were to have left it alone, could be considered “shock history.” As a stand-alone story, it left many questions that remained unanswered. It would be irresponsible for an historian to leave a story like this, posted without analysis. The investigative work […]

The Haynes-Beylor Murder

October 3, 2008 by


Picking up from where I left off with my last post… As I prepared to begin work on my thesis, I began sorting out my “findings” from the newspapers and Southern Unionist claims. Despite all that I already had, there was more to be learned. In fact, I exchanged e-mails with one person who made me aware […]

A family’s historical memory… of a Hessian ancestor

August 31, 2008 by


Other than posting about Civil War Memory and Digital History, I don’t often post about another period of American history that interests me a great deal… the colonial era through the American Revolution. However, in keeping in touch with the base theme of Civil War memory of this blog, it seems appropriate enough to make […]

The flip-side to the search for Black Confederates

July 23, 2008 by


While the hoopla lingers around the stories about Weary Clyburn and discussion begins to grow around Peter Carmichael’s great article on Kevin Levin’s Civil War Memory Blog, I figured it a great opportunity to remember the other side of the search for Black Confederates. John M. “Jack” Dogans was the only free black in Page […]

The Shenandoah Valley’s Delegates to the 1861 Virginia Secession Convention

April 16, 2008 by


I realized that I should have included this with my earlier posts about the vote for secession in the Shenandoah Valley. This is a record of the vote from Virginia’s Secession Convention. Keep in mind that these votes were made on April 4 and April 17 respectively. The public vote on secession did not come […]

“Recalling” Ford’s Theatre – a personal indulgence in Civil War “memory”

April 14, 2008 by


I didn’t learn about Edwin Arthur Emerson until about a year or so ago. I think the thing that most intrigued me was that, while I had been fascinated with the soldier family members who had served in the war, I did not realize that I had a family member present, on stage, on the […]

Number of voters in the Shenandoah Valley, 1856-1861

April 8, 2008 by


The following table specifies the number of votes cast in the three elections from 1856-1860 and the referendum vote on secession in 1861. I’ll comment more on this later. However, with a quick glance at the difference between numbers of voters in 1860 and 1861, in most cases (Rockingham and Shenandoah counties being the exception) […]

A pause in the data-flow regarding thoughts about Civil War sentiments in the Shenandoah Valley

April 4, 2008 by


Since I’m unable to find the next set of stats that I had planned to post today, I figured that this was a good opportunity to pause a bit and reflect on what I’ve put online and what is yet to come. About two years ago, when I was compiling data for my thesis, I […]

Southern Unionist Claims for the Shenandoah Valley

April 3, 2008 by


While the referendum vote on secession for the different counties of the Shenandoah Valley may reflect one thing (most especially to someone who doesn’t look beyond raw numbers), deeper probing into other numbers brings about a need to investigate even further. That said, the following is submitted for consideration in combination with my post from […]

Referendum numbers on secession in the Shenandoah Valley

April 2, 2008 by


Considering I brought up the use of coercion in the referendum for secession in Virginia (and more specifically in Page County in the Shenandoah Valley) in yesterday’s post, I thought it might be interesting to ride with this topic a little more. Today, I’m laying out the raw numbers on the referendum for all of […]

Coercion and the vote for secession

April 1, 2008 by


I can’t help but think of that scene in Gods & Generals when it came to the vote for secession in Rockbridge County, Virginia. Some may remember it, where the actor playing William Nelson Pendleton announced the vote and that there had been only one vote against secession in the county (after which, a person […]


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