Browsing All posts tagged under »James Draden Moore«

Who was free black Isaac Dunn?

May 8, 2013 by

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There are certain things that sit there… in my mind… unanswered in my quest to understand better my ancestors and the people around them… and this is one of them. He appears but once, as far as I can tell, in the census records. Isaac Dunn was listed, on September 6, 1860, as residing with […]

How a picture and an antique beer bottle led to interesting ancestral connections… (conclusion)

January 20, 2013 by

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Picking-up where I left off in yesterday’s post… Ah, yes, but even Draden’s association with alcohol distribution runs further back than that. The 1880s census shows him, as of June 2nd of that year, as a “Bar Keeper”, and boarding at the hotel (“The Crawford”, located on Main Street) owned by W.D.F. Duval, in Salem, Roanoke […]

How a picture and an antique beer bottle led to interesting ancestral connections… (part 1)

January 19, 2013 by

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Sometime in the 1980s, I received a photocopy of a picture (ca. 1887-89) from one of my distant cousins. It showed three men (and a dog & horse) standing in front of a C.C. Moore bottling wagon. I took it that the three men were my third great grandfather, Cyrus S. Moore, and my gg […]

Coincidence?

January 2, 2013 by

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Off topic… sorta, but… In the last week, I’ve scored three major pieces on Ebay; at least “major” to me, personally. All three have to do with my Moore family, specifically rooted in my third great grandfather (the same one I mentioned in the blog post the other day) or his sons. The first piece […]

“Did people call him a Union man?” “Yes, sir, and a great many called him a damn Yankee all the time.”

July 7, 2012 by

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My attention to the details of his life just weren’t there… it seemed they didn’t need to be… as a father-in-law to one of my distant uncles, John William Neer was an indirect link in the family tree… and, at one time, I knew nothing of his life, other than that indirect connection. Over time, […]

Despite what you say, your claim as a loyal Union man is disallowed…

May 20, 2012 by

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I’ve got a post coming about John W. Neer, a Union man from Harper’s Ferry. While no blood relative of mine, one of his daughters married my third great granduncle, James Draden Moore (1859-1899). Neer’s story is an interesting one, and I look forward to telling it, but I wanted to break-out one small portion […]

Trainmen…

September 12, 2011 by

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This past week, my grandfather, a “trainman” of, apparently, 25 (give or take) years, would have been 108… and it got me to thinking how incredibly cool it is that the railroad has played into my family history, since, perhaps, as early as the late 1860s.  I know, I know, I’m jumping the track (hey, […]

Maryland, my Maryland, wherefore art thou, my Maryland?

January 9, 2011 by

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Earlier this week, I posted a quick comment on my Facebook page about Maryland’s War of 1812 license plates. It’s everywhere, it’s everywhere! Yet, Maryland’s silence about the Sesquicentennial is excruciatingly painful. No blogs, no tweets, nothing… I’m not saying that the War of 1812 is unimportant… because it IS important. What bothers me is […]

Lutheran Cemetery, Clear Spring, 6:17 p.m.

September 25, 2010 by

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A quick drop-in to see how “old family” is doing… Photos are of the headstones of James Draden Moore, Mary Saunders Moore, and then… the twin Moore boys (Robert and James) who died at lockhouse 49. On to the lockhouse.

Looking for manumissions… on the part of my family

January 11, 2010 by

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A couple of months ago,  I purchased a book that provides information about the African-American manumissions for Washington County, Maryland. The objective… to see if I had any family members who freed slaves in the 1850s and even as late as the early 1860s, in advance of the Emancipation Proclamation. Now, as I mentioned in […]

Were “Black Republican Proclivities” at play in Clear Spring?

October 14, 2009 by

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Before I start with the article, I thought that I should point out… the Hagerstown Mail was a pro-secession publication, unlike Hagerstown’s Herald of Freedom and Torch Light. Apparently, the Mail, seeing all the talk (examples here and here) of strong Unionism in Clear Spring, thought that the town’s strong leanings toward Union might be influenced by […]