Browsing All posts tagged under »American Civil War«

Her last hours over Sumter…

April 11, 2011 by


The garrison flag, seen below, was actually replaced by the storm flag a few days prior to the bombardment. Nonetheless, it flew in defiance in the days leading up to the bombardment. Enjoy… *Image from the National Park Service’s site, Symbols of Honor.

Maryland is “Southron”, ya’ll… and therefore, Confederate!(???)

April 3, 2011 by


Oh, goodness… what do we have here? Obviously, the video has a number of issues, but I’m just going to stick to the “Southern = Confederate” issue rearing its ugly head, yet once again. There is no doubt that Maryland does indeed qualify as a Southern state… and therefore… her residents at the time of […]

Tracing President Lincoln’s Thoughts on Slavery

March 29, 2011 by


I meant to post this last month, but just now getting around to it. Eric Foner on Lincoln and slavery… to include abolition, emancipation, colonization, & etc. Very worthwhile stuff when considering some of the discussions within the blogosphere in the last few months. From NPR… *Especially interesting when we consider those who try […]

“That a Nation Might Live”, from Longwood University

February 15, 2011 by


Just got this a couple of hours ago from Longwood University and wanted to share asap: “That a Nation Might Live” is an online weekly podcast series (also available on iTunes) launched recently that traces the events of 150 years ago, reporting the week’s key developments in the run up to and during the war. […]

On Remembrance Day

November 20, 2010 by


It’s Remembrance Day in Gettysburg… and I deeply regret that I couldn’t make it as planned. Still, I take the time to remember… whether I’m there or not. Gettysburg experienced in November is different enough, but if you haven’t experienced Gettysburg on Remembrance Day, you miss an opportunity to see the place… if not feel […]

Virginia’s textbook ordeal: thinking beyond “Black Confederates”

November 17, 2010 by


Not long after the controversy over Virginia’s 4th grade history text began, like a number of others, I gave some thoughts about the mention of “Black Confederates” as well, but didn’t go beyond the single post. Yet, in the weeks that followed, I began to think more of what this means. Let’s focus specifically on […]

Death and Mourning in the Civil War… courtesy of the Museum of the Confederacy

October 21, 2010 by



October 17, 2010 by


Ah, Sunday morning… a fire is in the wood-stove to cut the morning chill, a warm cup of coffee sits nearby as I sit down to transcribe more of Strother’s recollections for appearance here later this afternoon. As I do so, I wonder why so many are more fascinated with the events on the battlefields […]

Plumb Grove – home of Jonathan Nesbitt, Jr.

October 11, 2010 by


I’ve got some photos that I took a couple of weeks back while on my road trip to Four Locks and Clear Spring, and I thought that I might as well put them on here for everyone to enjoy. I didn’t include them in the tour that weekend because there is no known tie between […]

“water of many turns”

October 9, 2010 by


Just the other day, I made reference to the Lenape/Delaware word “Conococheague“, which means “water of many turns.” Funny, but that pretty much summarizes the way I write this blog… not to mention the fluid nature of many blogs. The content can turn, twist, and completely shift, without warning. It’s more a reflection of what […]

Why “Cenantua”?

October 6, 2010 by


I love this time of year. It’s a chilly day, the sky is overcast… … I have a fire in the wood stove… … and a relaxing cup of cappuccino in my manly-man Mickey Mouse coffee mug (what else??!!) is close at-hand. Feels like a good time to sit down and write… just wish I […]

Doc Amiss’ ghost story

October 3, 2010 by


I’m really not a fan of modern ghost tours and “ghosts of history”-type books. For one thing, I get the impression that the stories being delivered are so incredibly embellished over the years, that they miss the meaty content of the stories told in years past; more fluff than solid content. I know, I know… […]

So, finally… this Confederate vet and the witch…

October 2, 2010 by


    One of my great-great grandfathers, Charles Robert “Tanner” Hillard, was born on October 3, 1844 (in fact, that will be 166 years ago… tomorrow), a son of Jacob (1784-1864) and Phoebe Elliott Hilliard (ca. 1822-???). As for the Civil War part goes… Charles’ younger brother, Jacob, hired himself out as a substitute (for […]

What do a Confederate veteran and a witch have in common?

October 1, 2010 by


Hey! It IS October, and seriously… what I said above is a sincere question. I’ll give details later this weekend… and no sarcastic answers to my question in the interim. In the meantime, like I said, it’s October! I love this time of year, and it brings to mind two things in particular… scary stuff […]

The art of arguing…

March 26, 2010 by


A little late on this one, but I just learned that the biennial Argumentation Conference was recently held at Wake Forest University. I see that V. William Balthrop has been examining “the discourse of contemporary Southern Heritage groups and the continued construction of a ‘Southern identity.'” For some reason, I think I’ve read this before, […]

Are we limited in our perspectives in the Civil War blogosphere?

January 26, 2009 by


After reading a comment made in one of my posts from few days ago, I realized something; something that I had really not thought of before. I think it is revealing in terms of how the Web can erase racial barriers. Nonetheless, of all of those who blog in the Civil War blogosphere, who among […]

Another new beginning, from a few years back

January 23, 2009 by


“Alfred Waud’s drawing captures the exuberance of the Little Rock, Arkansas, African American community as the U. S. Colored Troops returned home at the end of the Civil War. The victorious soldiers are joyously greeted by women and children.” From the Library of Congress’ “African-American Odyssey, Part 1” Dual-posted in Southern Unionists Chronicles.

The Slaves’ War: The Civil War in the Words of Former Slaves

December 6, 2008 by


Look’s like a book worth looking into. Has anybody read it yet?

“Imagined memory” and stereotypes as side-effects of Civil War-era art?

November 13, 2008 by


In response to a comment yesterday, I wrote: … when you have art that is created, not out of interpretation of real events, but based on how an artist imagines an historical person may have reacted in an unreal or imagined scenario, then you have an “imagined presentation.” Is it, at that point really historical art, […]

Reflecting on my own “memory” of the Civil War

March 1, 2008 by


There are some wonderful blogs out there that reflect on contemporary issues of Civil War memory and there are even rants of disgust over the way that Civil War memory has been distorted. While I tinker around a bit with my own thoughts on Civil War memory, I think it would be a great idea […]

Food for thought – a little combination of digital history and the Civil War

February 27, 2008 by


I have a digital history project in mind and would like to see if it is feasible. For starters, for anyone reading this blog, what do you consider the top 25 (if we can come up with that many) most controversial topics (excluding battle/military leader-related) pertaining to the Civil War?

Comparing Civil War memory to Revolutionary War memory

February 23, 2008 by


In one of my classes last spring at William & Mary, I had the opportunity to examine how former Loyalists and Tories from the American Revolution had been treated in historic memory. Now, some think that the two are one in the same, but even I came to realize that this is not the case. […]

The he-man Lincoln-haters club

February 21, 2008 by


About a week ago, I had the opportunity to attend the annual Lincoln Birthday event (sponsored by the Lincoln Society of Virginia) held at the Lincoln family cemetery near Broadway in Rockingham County, Virginia (the Lincoln family resided in this county since the 1760s, and Thomas Herring Lincoln, President Abraham Lincoln’s father, was born here in […]

Reflections on criticisms of the Web in education

February 18, 2008 by


I know that I said that I would not get into the criticisms of the use of the Web as an educational tool in history, but I think that discussion in favor of digital history actually benefits from pointing out some of the criticisms. I have to wonder, considering all of the criticisms of the […]


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,152 other followers