Browsing All Posts filed under »Visualizing History«

Meem’s Bottom Covered Bridge

November 2, 2010 by


I get this “historic-stuff-seeking urge” to pull-off I-81 at times, during my weekly commutes… this is where I snapped some quick photos today… … and while we’re at it, let’s take a look back toward the Massanutten from the bridge… you may recall my mentioning something about Meem’s Bottom in my post, “Why Cenantua?“. This […]

An execution… a ghost’s last hymn… and a curse fulfilled(?)

October 31, 2010 by


As I’ve mentioned several times in my postings throughout the month, October brings to mind stories of witches and ghosts, but one ghost story captures my thinking frequently throughout the month. I suppose, one can almost say that it literally “haunts” me. The story actually developed over time, with each piece of information I uncovered […]

On the Death of Mrs. Fannie S. Gibbons…

October 22, 2010 by


THE breath of Spring is nigh–it comes once more To glad the Earth where Winter’s frown hath been, And violets their fragrant incense pour On flowery paths, through dewy meadows green; But all in vain they smile for us–we mourn For thee, sweet Blossom, from our bosoms torn. The birds, gay warblers, flit from tree […]

Death and Mourning in the Civil War… courtesy of the Museum of the Confederacy

October 21, 2010 by



October 17, 2010 by


Ah, Sunday morning… a fire is in the wood-stove to cut the morning chill, a warm cup of coffee sits nearby as I sit down to transcribe more of Strother’s recollections for appearance here later this afternoon. As I do so, I wonder why so many are more fascinated with the events on the battlefields […]

I bet Ben would have liked blogging…

October 16, 2010 by


If he would inform, he must advance regularly from Things known to things unknown, distinctly without Confusion, and the lower he begins the better. It is a common Fault in Writers, to allow their Readers too much knowledge: They begin with that which should be the Middle, and skipping backwards and forwards, ’tis impossible for […]

FYI… “ghosting” Staunton tonight

October 15, 2010 by


More to follow… I hope.

Plumb Grove – home of Jonathan Nesbitt, Jr.

October 11, 2010 by


I’ve got some photos that I took a couple of weeks back while on my road trip to Four Locks and Clear Spring, and I thought that I might as well put them on here for everyone to enjoy. I didn’t include them in the tour that weekend because there is no known tie between […]

How did the doctor “take care” of the witch?

October 8, 2010 by


Just thinking back to how the doctor “saw to it” that the witch that “cursed” my great-great grandmother would be “in hell by morning.” Frankly, we will probably never know his method, and will wonder about the wide range of possibilities. Still, Samuel Kercheval did mention a couple of methods by which one could “cure… […]

Doc Amiss’ ghost story

October 3, 2010 by


I’m really not a fan of modern ghost tours and “ghosts of history”-type books. For one thing, I get the impression that the stories being delivered are so incredibly embellished over the years, that they miss the meaty content of the stories told in years past; more fluff than solid content. I know, I know… […]

About Geotag blogging

October 2, 2010 by


Geotag test 2- Confederate section, Thornrose Cemetery

October 2, 2010 by


Just a test of the Geotag feature, but, while I’m here… this section of land was used for burying both Union and Confederate dead who usually died while in the Confederate hospital that I just mentioned in the last post. The Union dead were later removed to the National Cemetery just to the east, and […]

Backtrack to Dam 5

September 26, 2010 by


I couldn’t resist… Dam 5 offers one of those rare opportunities to expand on Cyrus’ story, though, at best, it’s an indirect weave into the overall story. But before I start, I have to say, its incredibly cool to live blog on the move. You see, I’m sitting on the stone ledge above the roaring […]

Walking in the shadow of Cyrus – 2:19 p.m., 9/25/2010

September 25, 2010 by


This is the first part of a different sort of post… carried over the course of the next 16 hours or so. Call it an experiment, if you like… on a couple of levels actually. I’m checking-out the potential uses for live, roaming blogging, and, it so happens that I’m staying tonight in one of […]

One of my finds while in Kansas City

September 15, 2010 by


No, not Civil War-related, but family-related… I had just finished visiting the National World War I Museum, and having spotted the Spanish-American War Monument, I drove over to it to snap a shot or two. But then, I saw this monument on a hill within site of the Span-Am monument. Intrigued, I took a walk […]

The C&O Canal in 1917, courtesy of Thomas A. Edison…

September 13, 2010 by


When scrolling through YouTube last night in search of Seldom Scene’s rendition of the C&O Canal, I also found this rare treat. Just keep in mind, these are silent, but the scenes of cargo-hauling boats moving along the canal is something that has been lost to the ages. Part III has some great moving imagery […]

Seldom Scene’s rendition of the C&O Canal

September 12, 2010 by


As those who frequent this blog know, I also have interests in the history of the C&O Canal. So, when I saw this, I thought I’d share… “Hey, hey, hey, Lock Ready!” For more video footage of the canal, but in action in 1917, check out the follow-up post.

When a little goes a long way

September 8, 2010 by


Taking time to walk through the Winchester National Cemetery, it’s obvious the purpose for which this cemetery was made… as a place in which to bury (actually, rebury) Union soldiers. In addition to the graves that dot this relatively small parcel of land, there are also a number of monuments recognizing the sacrifices of men […]

The Milam Apple

September 7, 2010 by


Those who are regulars here know that I have an interest in antique apples. Among those varieties is the Milam. In all likelihood, most who read this probably won’t know about this variety. It’s not as popular as those you find in the grocery stores today… at least not popular today as it was in […]

A clash of “tennials”

September 2, 2010 by


As we are all aware, we are now in the midst of the Civil War Sesquicentennial. Things have been underway for a while, and, as Kevin points out… while it might not be as big a deal as some might hope, there is still… something, somewhere going on. Oftentimes, there is more going on than […]

How our expectations of interaction design impact our delivery as historians

August 31, 2010 by


I don’t think you see it on a massive scale at this time, but I think the historical author… the historical deliverer… is going to be challenged in times to come (if not already). We are trained, more or less, in a traditional style, centered mostly around print media. There is a certain way that […]

Yes, but would you really want to have lived back then?

August 13, 2010 by


Quick post based on passing thought. How many who study the Civil War would like the chance to experience it? Be that for a day, a week, a month… or whatever… how many actually “try” to experience it through living history, reenactments, etc. Now, how many would like to give WW1 a try? As for […]

WW1 numbers per state

August 13, 2010 by


What does all of this mean? Stay tuned for more discussion… Photo of an exhibit panel at the National WW1 Museum in Kansas City. * Sorry… the image isn’t as clear as I would prefer, but about the best I can do with the features available with the Droid.

A scene from “The Colt”: a one-on-one encounter, and Southern Unionism

August 3, 2010 by


I had planned on continuing along my recently staked-out digital history path today, but time being short today, I’ll need to put that off till later this week. Still, wanting to continue some sort of flow on the blog, I do have just enough time to post something about a movie I’ve been meaning to […]

“Hell no, our kids won’t go!”

July 30, 2010 by


I was going to post another installment of D.H. Strother’s “Recollections” today, but will hold off till tomorrow. I saw something posted by David over at Inconvenient South that caught my eye. David cites an article (from The Journal of American History, and written by Jeanette Keith) published in 2001 focused on Southern draft resistance […]

The impact of Web-based media on history

July 18, 2010 by


Looking back at my blog activity for the last two summers, I guess it shouldn’t surprise me that my blog posts are infrequent over the summer months this year… even more so these days, having started a new job in June. Still, it doesn’t mean I haven’t been thinking history… and the Web. The Web […]

Faded names on stones

May 31, 2010 by


Just another stone in a cemetery… But wait, he was a soldier… and he died in the closing weeks of the First World War… Makes you wonder a bit, huh? Or does it really? Who was the man? How did he die? Who were his parents, siblings, and maybe he had a wife. Did he […]

What?! No “love” for John Brown?!

May 16, 2010 by


Just an observation, but May 9 came and went a week ago today with not so much as one post about John Brown. Actually, until earlier this week, I didn’t have a clue that JB was born on May 9 (hmmm, a stubborn Taurus…). Rather, Brown had been defined, at least in my “memory”, by […]

The graves of “Galvanized Yankees” at Custer National Cemetery

March 31, 2010 by


Not too long ago, I took on the small task of looking into the stories behind the Galvanized Yankees who were buried (actually, removed from their original burial locations at Fort Rice and reburied in the Custer Battlefield Cemetery/Custer National Cemetery/Little Big Horn National Cemetery around the beginning of the 20th century). As most probably […]

Co. E of White’s Comanches in Luray (August 1894)

March 29, 2010 by


It’s rare that I find something related to Page County in the Civil War in another blog, so when I do, I’m obviously interested. Right away, I recognized that the image of Harrison Monroe Strickler in Scott Mingus’ recent post originated in this reunion photo from 1894.  My gggg-granduncle, Howard Richards, also appears in it, […]


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