Browsing All Posts filed under »slavery«

He gave them victories

May 1, 2013 by

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May 1, 2013… so begins the Sesqui of the Battle of Chancellorsville. As such, I’ve been thinking… What if Stonewall Jackson lived to command beyond Chancellorsville? Frankly, any forward speculation of his possible performances in battles after Chancellorsville is subject to so many factors that it’s not even funny. As such, forward speculation is a […]

Interpreting USCTs in places where they were not…

March 10, 2013 by

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Recently, there’s been a flurry of posts about USCTs (see Craig Swain’s, here; Emmanuel Dabney’s, here; Kevin Levin’s, here; and Jimmy Price’s, here), and, as I’m in the process of compiling a list of USCTs born in Shenandoah Valley counties, I find it timely. Should the interpretation of USCTs be incorporated into places in which they were not… […]

Christian F. Laise’s ties to Berkeley County’s freedmen and Unionists

February 17, 2013 by

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A couple of years ago there was a good article in The Journal (Martinsburg, W.V.), in which postwar (1880s, actually) efforts by Christian Frederick Laise were part of the focus. Berkeley County has an African-American area listed in the National Register. After their freedom at the end of the Civil War, many former slaves had […]

Another perspective on Emancipation Day

January 1, 2013 by

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It didn’t dawn on me until I read a post on Facebook… Yes, I know it’s the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, and I’ve been keenly aware of that since midnight. Some see the document and its reach as meaningless, but those who do so seem to look at it more from the surface… […]

A Confederate general’s daughter embraces New England

November 21, 2012 by

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Not a story about a Southern Unionist… well, actually… there are connections, but… Civil War-related… check… On the eve of Thanksgiving… works even better. Would it seem odd that a daughter of a Confederate general would write about… the children of the Mayflower? If you think so,well… that particular work was only near the end […]

Not ready for prime time Rev War history… here in the Valley?

October 27, 2012 by

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When folks think about Rev War stuff in the Winchester area they might think of Washington’s Office (though it’s French & Indian War), Daniel Morgan, Lord Fairfax (as one might expect… a Loyalist during the Rev War) and so on. Just to the east, in Clarke County… between Boyce and Berryville… folks get another dose of […]

A larger project in the works

October 25, 2012 by

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Obviously, I’ve not been writing a great deal over the past few weeks. For one, I’ve been struggling with a bout of writer’s block. On top of that I’m battling with content… what I want to put in a blog, and what I want to put in a book. Yup, a book is in the […]

Schmucker’s ties to the Shenandoah Valley Lutheran community, and his abolitionist interests

September 28, 2012 by

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This past weekend, reader/blogger Vince (of Lancaster at War) suggested something that sounded worth further investigation… and I was soon on the hunt, looking to see how Samuel Simon Schmucker may have impacted Lutheran ministers in the Shenandoah Valley. Since Schmucker was head of the Gettysburg Seminary during the decades (to be specific, 1826-1864) leading-up […]

German influence in the Shenandoah Valley… even into the Civil War

September 23, 2012 by

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I posed a question yesterday… But, how far back, before the 1850s, is it necessary to take such a study? Of course, I meant, specifically… how the varying sentiments during the Civil War era South came to be… and how they might be traceable  to earlier points in time. Again, as one who concentrates heavily […]

Catching-up: day 3 of the Harpers Ferry-Antietam Sesqui weekend

September 15, 2012 by

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Finding myself adequately worn-out after the hike up Maryland Heights, on Thursday… and then the “breakout” tour in Harpers Ferry, last night, I haven’t been able to keep pace with blog posts. So, drafting a hasty one before heading out this morning. It’s been great so far. The hike up Maryland Heights… with a friend/co-worker […]

The alarm goes out in Clear Spring, 150 years ago today

September 10, 2012 by

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Following-up on my post from Saturday, I look back again at the village of Clear Spring. I have nothing to show how my ancestors felt… there and in nearby Four Locks. Instead, I rely on what is available… not so much as a reflection of what they also felt, but to add another dimension to the […]

An ironic newspaper ad

September 3, 2012 by

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But more from our vantage point, and not from those who read it at the time… This is from the September 3, 1862 edition of Hagerstown’s newspaper… 150 years ago today. Now, I guess it seems more ironic because of 1) Hagerstown’s proximity to Sharpsburg/Antietam… and 2) the fact that, in just 14 days, the […]

Telling the story of the Civil War: The Joseph’s Coat* approach

August 10, 2012 by

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Over at Emerging Civil War, Kathleen Logothetis posted something today (Let’s Talk Openly About Slavery: Interpretation at Monticello) that caught my attention and made me think a little more about what might be considered a challenge in telling the story of the Civil War. Not that it’s difficult to weave together the topic of slavery with the Civil War… that’s […]

“I don’t think there were really that many”

July 13, 2012 by

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Not so much a matter of content delivery this morning, and more about a thought that’s been lingering with me for a bit… About a month ago, a friend of mine attended a reenactment, here in the Valley (the Cross Keys/Port Republic event held on… the Cedar Creek battlefield). When he had an opportunity to talk […]

“… he… was not going to vote for a slave government.”

July 11, 2012 by

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The argument can be common. The war was about slavery vs. the war was not about slavery. Usually, when those two points of view collide, the result is a string of reasons why… coming from both sides. More significant to me are the accounts of people who lived in that time… and even better if […]

A former slave vouches for the Unionism of his former owner

July 9, 2012 by

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Seeing what I do in discussions among folks regarding Civil War era studies, there can be extreme views regarding slavery. Some lean hard in one direction, talking about how the cruelties of slavery were all fabrications, or very rare. Some lean hard in another direction and talk about the cruelties of slavery, and that, no matter the case, […]

Along the road to McDowell… another Sesqui moment

May 6, 2012 by

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Because of the move, I’m still without certain notes and books to back me up with quotes and whatnot… so, I’m going to wing it again… The masses are flocking (or so it would seem) to McDowell, Virginia this weekend for the 150th anniversary of the battle, but… it’s not the actual Sesqui until Tuesday. […]

On Southerners and secession (1860-61)… motivations…

January 11, 2012 by

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Please pardon my rather lengthy absences over the past few months. Between dealing with some health issues, having surgery… and somewhere in between… still working an average 90+ hours per two weeks… not to mention the average 12-15 hours of commuting per week… writing has fallen significantly on my list of priorities (sleep has ranked […]

Shenandoah Valley African-Americans in the Civil War… a sampling

October 30, 2011 by

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You might recall a post from this past July, in which I briefly mentioned Shenandoah Valley African-Americans in the USCT. I haven’t had as much time to work with that project as I would like, but it’s one that is always on my mind. Perhaps, over winter, I’ll be able to wrap it up. Anyway, […]

Beyond John Brown… an enduring legacy not always so obvious, in the Shenandoah Valley

October 25, 2011 by

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It’s just over a week after the 152nd anniversary of Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry. While many will continue to consider the actions of Brown, the man… especially as to whether he should be judged a hero or terrorist… this excellent video, from West Virginia Public Broadcasting, reveals an enduring, positive legacy, in the wake of Brown’s actions at Harpers Ferry… and […]

Confederates, Southern Unionists, and… The Waltons?!

October 23, 2011 by

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To be clear… I’ve always been a fan of the Waltons… though I prefer the first three seasons over the rest. Not only was it based largely on the writings of a Virginian, but also focused on a fictional Virginia family under the shadow of the Blue Ridge (albeit, on the eastern side). I still […]

What historical period dominates the (interpretive) landscape, and which are sorely absent?

October 15, 2011 by

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As I drive nearly the entire stretch of the Shenandoah Valley (excepting the West Virginia counties of Berkeley and Jefferson), at least four days a week, I pass various sites of interests. Few, actually, are marked with any indication of their stories… though I’m aware of the stories for most of them. I suspect many […]

149 years ago today, but, what about a snapshot of 150 years ago today? Life one year before THE battle.

September 17, 2011 by

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I encourage those who are able, to take advantage of all that is going on at Antietam National Battlefield, this weekend. Regretfully, I won’t be able to make it… though I most certainly plan on being there this time next year (and might even take a little time to hop across the Potomac next weekend, […]

“I bought myself”… Henry Roy’s Civil War

July 19, 2011 by

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First, we have USCT soldiers from the Shenandoah Valley (and, yes, there are more stories to come about those men). Now, in yet another effort to add dimension to the Civil War in the Shenandoah Valley, I present Henry Roy… Roy was a resident of Warren County, Virginia, in the northeast central Shenandoah Valley. A […]