Browsing All Posts filed under »Page County Confederates«

Romney, 150 years ago today: the first in a series of “blood clashes”

October 26, 2011 by

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It’s barely a blip on the radars when it comes to Sesquicentennial commemoration/remembrance, but on this day, 150 years ago, some of my kin… some in blue, and others in gray… may well have exchanged shots. No, it wasn’t in one of the big battles, but, rather, a small scrap that resulted in Gen. B.F. […]

In three minutes, sum up the history of your county in the Civil War

September 14, 2011 by

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If you know most of the nuts and bolts that make up that history, and are tasked with accomplishing that request… it can be a tall order, and rather painful. You’re forced to bypass key elements, including certain names and events, that you know are critical in the overall story, but… this is all the […]

“they’re not strangers… and they stay as they lay…”

September 13, 2011 by

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There’s something that struck me long ago, while watching Last of the Mohicans (the newest version), but not necessarily in relation to that time period. Specifically, I’m talking about the marking or remarking of graves of Civil War soldiers. We see it often, in instances where folks, today, wish to mark the graves of people […]

Their run to the guns…

July 22, 2011 by

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Before I left Manassas yesterday, I had to do just one more thing. Yes, I was hot and miserable at the time, but, it didn’t matter, I had to do it. This is the first place that I’ve visited this year, on the 150th anniversary of an event in which my people were present, 150 […]

“I go in search of brother”

July 22, 2011 by

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22nd. I go in search of brother Wm* who had been badly wounded; find him near the battlefield, and take him with other to the Junction. I then go in search of some other wounded, and find a few. Start to F. Royal at midnight with them. I am very wet from being in the […]

Tangents, and looking for intersections, Part 2

June 26, 2011 by

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So, about that Jessie Scout that I’ve been mentioning… First, Jessie Scouts were known to be of great value to the Union cavalry, but… often it was because they wore gray… not blue. According to this site, The concept involving the use of enlisted Union soldiers as scouts, in enemy uniform, collecting information while operating […]

Why was it called Jackson’s “Prayer Oak”?

June 4, 2011 by

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I was asked a question by a reader yesterday, and thought I’d give a little more background about the Jackson Prayer Oak/Tree. Why is it called Jackson’s “Prayer Oak”? In the wake of victories at Cross Keys and Port Republic, Stonewall Jackson moved his army into Brown’s Gap for a few days. A few days […]

Hmmm… about that referendum on secession in Virginia

May 22, 2011 by

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Tomorrow marks the day, 150 years ago, when Virginians were given the chance to vote on secession… although, really, it didn’t mean a great deal considering the mobilization that had taken place, and… let’s not forget the Commonwealth’s offer for Richmond to be the capital of the Confederacy… before the referendum. Really, it was a […]

The mustering of troops in Virginia… revisiting enlistments in the militia

May 18, 2011 by

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It’s the middle of May 1861… and Virginians are flocking to units across the state… In some areas of Virginia, the mustering of troops for Virginia units (ultimately assigned to the cause of the Confederacy) began as early as the day the news of secession hit the streets. No doubt, some were quite eager to […]

All is not as it may first appear… the poetess and her work

May 1, 2011 by

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Cornelia Jane Mathews Jordan is an excellent example of one of the many paths that sprung forth from basic Southern Unionism. While one piece of her work reflects a strong affection to the Union and the flag, her opinions were not concrete, and were greatly influenced by her affiliations and the situations that she encountered, during the course of the war. ...[ Read more...]

A Confederate heritage that I built…

April 16, 2011 by

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As shocking as it might seem to some who peruse this blog, and especially my Southern Unionist Chronicles blog (which desperately needs some new posts…), I grew up on Confederate heritage. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean that I was raised on that heritage, by my family. Sure, in passing conversation, I learned I had ancestors […]

A quest to know more about my Virginia ancestor who spoke out against secession

April 3, 2011 by

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As I mentioned yesterday, after posting a few items focused on anti-secession rhetoric in Virginia (during this time of the year, 150 years ago) this past week, I began thinking again about an ancestor of mine who also spoke out against secession at this same time. John Shuler (1815-1908) was a well-to-do farmer in Grove […]

Were Virginia’s Confederate Reserves a smokescreen of deception?

March 23, 2011 by

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I’m really jumping the gun here, because I should be holding this story in reserve (sure, why not… pun intended) until 2014… marking the 150th anniversary of the establishment of Virginia’s Confederate reserve units. Still, I brought it up the other day (in “WYSIWYG Confederates?”) , so I figured that I would pick-up from where […]

WYSIWYG Confederates?

March 20, 2011 by

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Pardon the silence for the last week. A few unavoidable matters over the past week set posting back a bit, but let me see if I can get things moving once again… What are WYSIWYG Confederates? Well, in Web development, WYSIWYG is an acronym for “What you see is what you get”, and, in some […]

“I call that bold talk for a one-eyed fat man!”

March 9, 2011 by

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Well, the quote from True Grit is at least fitting, in part… the part relating to bold talk coming from different enlistees, early in the Civil War, or suggestions that an ancestor was making a bold statement, through his enlistment, when there is nothing there to prove it. I doubt many could claim the one-eyed […]

Yes, Page County, you once had slaves…

January 16, 2011 by

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While the audience of this blog is typically from well beyond the boundaries of my home county (and, I’m happy to say, even beyond the confines of this continent), I frequently look back to that place, as I have spent a considerable number of years writing about its history. No doubt, it’s fascinating to me […]

The Civil War… “through the eyes of my people”

December 31, 2010 by

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Just jabbed my friend Harry a little by pointing out that some still refer to the Bull Run battles as the Battles of 1st and 2nd Manassas, respectively. It was all in good fun, and owe a hat tip to Harry for pointing out that there are some quality Civil War stamps on the horizon… […]

One site, multiple angles for interpretation

December 19, 2010 by

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One of my favorite historic sites in Page County, Virginia is Catherine’s Furnace. Because of efforts made in the early 2000s, the site has one Virginia Civil War Trails marker. I was fortunate to be involved in deciding that the site merited a marker, and I also wrote the text and provided images for the […]

An execution… a ghost’s last hymn… and a curse fulfilled(?)

October 31, 2010 by

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As I’ve mentioned several times in my postings throughout the month, October brings to mind stories of witches and ghosts, but one ghost story captures my thinking frequently throughout the month. I suppose, one can almost say that it literally “haunts” me. The story actually developed over time, with each piece of information I uncovered […]

Charles M. Brown… Page County’s “Black Confederate”… or… maybe not(?)

October 27, 2010 by

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As, I believe, most are aware (mostly because of the recent issue with the textbooks in Virginia), there is a great deal of talk about the subject of “Black Confederates” at this time, and, in the CW blogosphere, I think Andy Hall and Kevin Levin are handling it just fine. I’ve engaged in discussion about […]

Caroline & the Jack O’ Lantern

October 16, 2010 by

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This ghostly tale is a bit differentv from that of Doc Amiss. What I find particularly interesting is that it comes from the time before the Civil War, and involves one of the Brumback family slaves. I found this tale in a column (a long-running column, I might add) called “Do You Remember”, which appeared […]

The “fire witch”

October 9, 2010 by

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Just 146 years ago yesterday, the episode known as “The Burning” drew to a close in the Shenandoah Valley. Gen. Phil Sheridan had cut a swathe from Augusta County, north into Rockingham, Page, and Shenandoah Counties before coming to a halt around Strasburg, Virginia. No doubt, the devastation to the “breadbasket of the Confederacy” was […]

Doc Amiss’ ghost story

October 3, 2010 by

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I’m really not a fan of modern ghost tours and “ghosts of history”-type books. For one thing, I get the impression that the stories being delivered are so incredibly embellished over the years, that they miss the meaty content of the stories told in years past; more fluff than solid content. I know, I know… […]

“Hell no, our kids won’t go!”

July 30, 2010 by

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I was going to post another installment of D.H. Strother’s “Recollections” today, but will hold off till tomorrow. I saw something posted by David over at Inconvenient South that caught my eye. David cites an article (from The Journal of American History, and written by Jeanette Keith) published in 2001 focused on Southern draft resistance […]