Browsing All Posts filed under »CW “forgetfulness”«

Recent reenactments and the media

January 23, 2011 by

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We’ve seen a couple reenactments lately, and they haven’t been reenactments of battles. The slave auction reenactment, I think, was high impact. It continues to make an impression on YouTube, but honestly, there are a couple of videos available, and the best is one (=>see a post from a few days ago, in which I […]

On Georgia’s secession, 150 years ago yesterday…

January 20, 2011 by

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As the anniversary of each state’s vote to secede goes by, I see a tweet or two announcing the fact, but little discussion about the same. Occasionally, a newspaper article or editorial appears in a state newspaper’s online edition. Pretty much, it seems at times as if the states seceded… and that was it. They […]

Yes, Page County, you once had slaves…

January 16, 2011 by

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While the audience of this blog is typically from well beyond the boundaries of my home county (and, I’m happy to say, even beyond the confines of this continent), I frequently look back to that place, as I have spent a considerable number of years writing about its history. No doubt, it’s fascinating to me […]

“All we ask is to be left alone”

January 15, 2011 by

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I’m picking-up from where I left off in my last post… Regarding some of those who opposed secession, and continued to do so… it didn’t necessarily mean that they were ready to go to war against their neighbors and friends, in defense of their position. Instead, many preferred to be left alone. They simply didn’t […]

Proud to be a Southerner!

January 2, 2011 by

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Sure, I love the South, for ALL of its history and heritage… it’s my history… it’s my heritage. But, to be proud of Southern heritage in connection with the war years between 1861-1865, what does that mean, exactly? Let’s keep it simple today… It means an ability to remain conscious of the fact that to […]

Union veterans in postwar reconciliation… giving up ground won?

January 1, 2011 by

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Keith Harris has an interesting post up today, discussing how G.A.R. members saw Robert E. Lee in postwar remembrance. Between this and their reaction toward the return of Confederate battleflags, one would think that, though interested in participating in gestures of reconciliation, Union veterans were unwilling to give up ground gained so easily forget the […]

How all Northerners “then” weren’t really so out of touch with “being Southern”

November 14, 2010 by

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It’s bad enough to hear some contemporary Southerners speak of Northerners as if it was still the time of the Civil War, but it’s even worse to hear Southerners speak of the people of the North from the time of the war, as if they could not, in the least bit, identify with the culture […]

The Presidential election of 1860: National Results… and results in the Shenandoah Valley

November 6, 2010 by

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On this day, 150 years ago, people voted… and, laid-out on maps, the results were as follows (the top map is much more detailed, but I regret to say, I can’t find a better image): In the Shenandoah Valley, the the popular vote was… County Abraham Lincoln (Republican) John Bell (Constitutional Union) John C. Breckinridge […]

It’s 1860. Who do you vote for?

November 2, 2010 by

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Not the exact date, but today is election day… and on election day 150 years ago, in 1860, a good deal was at stake. So, who do you vote for? Strike that… who would get your ancestors’ votes? Lincoln, Douglas, Breckinridge, or Bell… and why? Without looking, do you know their platforms? After all, a […]

Reflections…

October 17, 2010 by

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Ah, Sunday morning… a fire is in the wood-stove to cut the morning chill, a warm cup of coffee sits nearby as I sit down to transcribe more of Strother’s recollections for appearance here later this afternoon. As I do so, I wonder why so many are more fascinated with the events on the battlefields […]

… and they were all Southern, alike.

September 21, 2010 by

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I’ve said it before… the South does not equal the Confederacy. In fact, Southerness in general is not a reflection of the Confederacy. Southerness existed before the Confederacy… Southerness was and is the culture. Modern Confederateness, on the other hand, is a culture unto itself and is not to be confused as dominant over Southerness, […]

Confabulation

September 17, 2010 by

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* Time for a guest post by Craig Swain. I’ve been looking forward to this one since Craig tossed the idea at me. He offers some good points about problems with historical memory, and especially Lost Cause as remembered today by folks who don’t have “memory” of then. As I’ve mentioned a few times… too […]

Organizational affiliated Confederate veterans vice non-organizational Confederate vets

August 19, 2010 by

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I’ve often wondered just what percentage of Confederate veterans actually belonged to organizations such as the U.C.V. More importantly, just how many did not… and why? I know there were some vets who didn’t think much of reunions with their former adversaries (though I cannot recall, at this time, in what sources I’ve seen this […]

Imagined “memory” vs. Realized/actual memory

August 18, 2010 by

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Somewhere in my diminished amount of free time lately, I’ve spent some time investigating the realized/actual memory of Southerners at the time of WW1 and even during the Spanish-American War, and all I can say at this point is that it baffles me when it comes to some, today, who suggest that their comments/”position” are/is […]

The Southern connection between WW1 and the Civil War

August 14, 2010 by

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Sure, the circumstances were different… 1861 and 1918 were different times. But were people really all that different? Consider this… if we don’t take time to consider the complicating factors behind how men became part of the two armies (Confederate and the AEF), then it becomes convenient… even easy to reflect merely on numbers and […]

A scene from “The Colt”: a one-on-one encounter, and Southern Unionism

August 3, 2010 by

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I had planned on continuing along my recently staked-out digital history path today, but time being short today, I’ll need to put that off till later this week. Still, wanting to continue some sort of flow on the blog, I do have just enough time to post something about a movie I’ve been meaning to […]

“Hell no, our kids won’t go!”

July 30, 2010 by

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I was going to post another installment of D.H. Strother’s “Recollections” today, but will hold off till tomorrow. I saw something posted by David over at Inconvenient South that caught my eye. David cites an article (from The Journal of American History, and written by Jeanette Keith) published in 2001 focused on Southern draft resistance […]

The Southern Citizen Rescue Expedition of 1861-1865

June 2, 2010 by

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I enjoy looking at history from different angles, and I’ve actually been thinking about the Southern Unionists thing in a different way. Interestingly, in a ListServ discussion today (I know, Kevin, I still haven’t learned my lesson), it came to mind once again. It might seem trivial to some, but I don’t necessarily believe it […]

What?! No “love” for John Brown?!

May 16, 2010 by

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Just an observation, but May 9 came and went a week ago today with not so much as one post about John Brown. Actually, until earlier this week, I didn’t have a clue that JB was born on May 9 (hmmm, a stubborn Taurus…). Rather, Brown had been defined, at least in my “memory”, by […]

A matter of treason: is it really so hard to accept?

May 7, 2010 by

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Kevin’s post earlier this week left me thinking about several things. I think it is an excellent piece about separating our sentiments today, from the sentiments of people from the past… and the complications that historians may find in being objective. I’d like to expand on this more later, in another post, but, for now, […]

The voice of the Southern people left unheard…

April 26, 2010 by

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Took a little “virtual walk” among some items in the Valley of the Shadow today and found quite a bit that was of interest, but wanted to throw these out for consideration… all from the Feb. 26, 1861 issue of the Staunton Spectator… The Natchez Courier “Contends that the people of Natchez were not in […]

Rockingham County, Virginia’s John Francis Lewis: his position on secession, the Confederacy, and postwar Virginia

April 23, 2010 by

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Following-up on my passing mention of Rockingham County, Virginia’s delegates to the Virginia Secession Convention in this post the other day, I thought it might be of interest to readers to know a little more about one of those delegates. As the obituary from the New York Times indicates, John Francis Lewis was openly opposed […]

A snowball effect: the continued propagation of bad history in Confederate History Month in Va.

April 21, 2010 by

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It just continues to get worse. As Kevin pointed out in a post yesterday, the S.C.V. camp in Harrisonburg/Rockingham County placed a proclamation in the Harrisonburg Daily New Record. Rockingham isn’t my home county, but I do have ancestry (including one third great grandfather in Co. A of the 58th Virginia Militia, and several cousins […]

Comparing reasons why the CW was fought with today’s tea party movement? Oh, come on!

April 17, 2010 by

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“The War Between the States was fought for the same reasons that the tea party movement today is voicing their opinion. And that is that you have large government that’s not listening to the people, there’s going to be heavy taxation,” Fayard said Monday from his home in Duck Hill, Miss. “And the primary cause […]

Invoking the Name of Uncle Billy

April 16, 2010 by

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I should have predicted this last week. As the debate over Governor McDonnell’s statement continues, someone would cite General Sherman’s March to the Sea or through the Carolinas out of context. And we have at least one from Mike Church: Yes, only “Confederates-took up arms against their fellow Americans.” Gee, what does that make the men of […]

Their own worst enemy

April 14, 2010 by

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Last night, when I was thinking about developing a post about how [many] Confederate celebrationists have essentially made things worse for themselves for not having acknowledged different historical facts in their efforts to “honor” the Confederate soldier, this was posted by Brooks Simpson. What a fine example of how these celebrationists have gone down the […]

… and then there is the history-warping media…

April 13, 2010 by

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While CNN and others challenge the idea of Virginia’s proclamation for Confederate History Month, I think it’s a fine time to point out that many in the media are doing an equal amount of injustice to history as those who want to take Confederate history down the “Moonlight and Magnolias” path. It’s really sad, but […]

Was Appomattox really sad for ALL those who loved the South in 1865?

April 11, 2010 by

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Once again, while reading today’s post by Kevin, I’m compelled to write something longer than a comment to the post. Specifically, there was a comment at Richard Williams’ blog that was reflective of one contemporary person’s opinion of what April 9, 1865 meant to “all of us who love the South.” Well, to be frank, […]