Browsing All Posts filed under »Ancestral tidbits«

Maryland Unionists address the matter of Federal “interference”

July 23, 2011 by

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“Old Maryland’s Wrongs” This is a favorite expression with the rebels of the South, who tried but failed to seduce our State from her loyalty to the Union. The other day, on the occasion of the presentation of a piece of secession bunting to the Baltimore Regiment in the rebel army at Richmond, Mr. JEFFERSON DAVIS, who […]

Their run to the guns…

July 22, 2011 by

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Before I left Manassas yesterday, I had to do just one more thing. Yes, I was hot and miserable at the time, but, it didn’t matter, I had to do it. This is the first place that I’ve visited this year, on the 150th anniversary of an event in which my people were present, 150 […]

“I go in search of brother”

July 22, 2011 by

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22nd. I go in search of brother Wm* who had been badly wounded; find him near the battlefield, and take him with other to the Junction. I then go in search of some other wounded, and find a few. Start to F. Royal at midnight with them. I am very wet from being in the […]

Reveille by picket fire, and a cannon…

July 21, 2011 by

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This morning we were awakened by the firing of our pickets. After eating a hearty breakfast and filling our haversacks with provisions, we were again on the march. The artillery of the enemy could be distinctly heard on our right. After marching and counter marching for sometime, we were stationed within a-half mile of the […]

The run to the guns…

July 20, 2011 by

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For those of you are going… see you in the morning, on the Plains of Manassas…

Why was it called Jackson’s “Prayer Oak”?

June 4, 2011 by

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I was asked a question by a reader yesterday, and thought I’d give a little more background about the Jackson Prayer Oak/Tree. Why is it called Jackson’s “Prayer Oak”? In the wake of victories at Cross Keys and Port Republic, Stonewall Jackson moved his army into Brown’s Gap for a few days. A few days […]

Luray’s witness tree

June 3, 2011 by

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Since we’re in mourning for the Jackson Prayer Oak (see here, and here… and yes, I’m a tree hugger of sorts… especially when it comes to witness trees), I figured it was a perfect time to talk about another witness tree, but further down the Valley, in Page County. While this tree didn’t witness any […]

Hmmm… about that referendum on secession in Virginia

May 22, 2011 by

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Tomorrow marks the day, 150 years ago, when Virginians were given the chance to vote on secession… although, really, it didn’t mean a great deal considering the mobilization that had taken place, and… let’s not forget the Commonwealth’s offer for Richmond to be the capital of the Confederacy… before the referendum. Really, it was a […]

The search for family in Civil War draft records

May 20, 2011 by

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A little sidetrack for just a bit, but, on an ancestor hunt. Earlier today, I realized that ancestry.com has Civil War draft records. So, I couldn’t wait to get home to see if for my third great grandfather, Cyrus S. Moore, by draft time, 1863, was still working his canal boat, the G.P. Lloyd, on […]

Looking back at the Pratt Street (Baltimore) Riot

April 20, 2011 by

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Since I’m a little past due on the Maryland part of my Southron heritage… 150 years ago, yesterday… And then, this video from the Catholic Review: O.k., interesting, but once again, “Southern” continues to be entangled in the whole “they were all secessionists” stereotype. So, who’s with me? All those in favor of clarification… say […]

A Confederate heritage that I built…

April 16, 2011 by

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As shocking as it might seem to some who peruse this blog, and especially my Southern Unionist Chronicles blog (which desperately needs some new posts…), I grew up on Confederate heritage. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean that I was raised on that heritage, by my family. Sure, in passing conversation, I learned I had ancestors […]

A quest to know more about my Virginia ancestor who spoke out against secession

April 3, 2011 by

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As I mentioned yesterday, after posting a few items focused on anti-secession rhetoric in Virginia (during this time of the year, 150 years ago) this past week, I began thinking again about an ancestor of mine who also spoke out against secession at this same time. John Shuler (1815-1908) was a well-to-do farmer in Grove […]

Reflections and parallels

April 2, 2011 by

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As I sat down to enjoy my morning coffee, I began thinking, again, of what I’ve been thinking about all week. With each anti-secession post, I can’t help but reflect on my third great-grandfather, John Shuler (who, incidentally, was the same age, in 1861, as I am now… just a casual observation… no more) who, […]

Remember the Alamo! 175 years ago today.

March 6, 2011 by

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There was, indeed, a Robert Moore in the Alamo when it fell, 175 years ago today. I remember reading his name on the list of those lost there, when I visited that sacred ground in Texas, a few years ago. I doubt that the Alamo’s Robert B. Moore is any relation(*), but he was born […]

Southern by the grace of cornbread!

February 23, 2011 by

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Thinking about Craig’s post from the other day, I remembered something I’ve been meaning to post about cornbread… yes, cornbread. Now cornbread has become known as something distinctly “Southron”, but appears to  have origins with the Native People of what is now the southeastern U.S. (references vary, but among those suggested as originators are the […]

Were some Union soldiers fighting to preserve slavery?(!)

February 19, 2011 by

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Yes, you read that correctly. Give me a little time, and I’ll set the stage… As many who follow this blog know, one of my favorite areas of study is western Maryland… most especially, the Clear Spring and Conococheague Districts in Washington County. Likewise, I spend a good deal of time researching the men from […]

The heritage dilemma and the Civil War

February 8, 2011 by

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Just a quick thought, but… What is one’s personal Civil War heritage? I see it as that link to the past through ancestors. So, if heritage is a part of us… the blood of our ancestry running through us, I’m wondering… With each generation, there comes the possibility/probability that a new line of heritage is […]

An amazing family discovery

February 5, 2011 by

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Going to divert focus here for just a bit; the reason being a recent unique find pertaining to my ancestry. Before I spill the beans, I figure I better set the stage. About 17 years ago, I started learning about another branch of my family tree… the McKinney and Quigley family lines. After growing up […]

Yes, Page County, you once had slaves…

January 16, 2011 by

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While the audience of this blog is typically from well beyond the boundaries of my home county (and, I’m happy to say, even beyond the confines of this continent), I frequently look back to that place, as I have spent a considerable number of years writing about its history. No doubt, it’s fascinating to me […]

“All we ask is to be left alone”

January 15, 2011 by

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I’m picking-up from where I left off in my last post… Regarding some of those who opposed secession, and continued to do so… it didn’t necessarily mean that they were ready to go to war against their neighbors and friends, in defense of their position. Instead, many preferred to be left alone. They simply didn’t […]

Those who offered resistance: Unconditional Unionists in Alabama’s secession convention

January 11, 2011 by

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I’m tweeting some stuff about Southern Unionism in Alabama… after all, today is the 150th anniversary of Alabama’s vote to secede… but, at 61 for and 39 against, it calls for closer examination. The online Encyclopedia of Alabama has a nice piece about Alabama Unionists => here (written by Margaret M. Storey, who is also […]

How all Northerners “then” weren’t really so out of touch with “being Southern”

November 14, 2010 by

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It’s bad enough to hear some contemporary Southerners speak of Northerners as if it was still the time of the Civil War, but it’s even worse to hear Southerners speak of the people of the North from the time of the war, as if they could not, in the least bit, identify with the culture […]

The Albemarle Barracks burial site

November 6, 2010 by

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For a number of months, I’ve been wanting to track down the site of Albemarle Barracks, but my travels across the Blue Ridge to Charlottesville haven’t offered an opportunity to take the time… until yesterday. There are lots of places in one particular area of “the ‘ville” that indicate the former presence of Hessians, but […]

It’s 1860. Who do you vote for?

November 2, 2010 by

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Not the exact date, but today is election day… and on election day 150 years ago, in 1860, a good deal was at stake. So, who do you vote for? Strike that… who would get your ancestors’ votes? Lincoln, Douglas, Breckinridge, or Bell… and why? Without looking, do you know their platforms? After all, a […]

An execution… a ghost’s last hymn… and a curse fulfilled(?)

October 31, 2010 by

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As I’ve mentioned several times in my postings throughout the month, October brings to mind stories of witches and ghosts, but one ghost story captures my thinking frequently throughout the month. I suppose, one can almost say that it literally “haunts” me. The story actually developed over time, with each piece of information I uncovered […]

Plumb Grove – home of Jonathan Nesbitt, Jr.

October 11, 2010 by

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I’ve got some photos that I took a couple of weeks back while on my road trip to Four Locks and Clear Spring, and I thought that I might as well put them on here for everyone to enjoy. I didn’t include them in the tour that weekend because there is no known tie between […]

A mother returns to her daughter…

October 10, 2010 by

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It’s extremely rare to see me recycle content, but I thought that I’d like to revisit a tale of a ghost that I mentioned last year. Considering the article appeared in the Hagerstown paper on February 8, 1860, there’s a chance that the story was even enjoyed by my Moore kin at Four Locks and […]

The “fire witch”

October 9, 2010 by

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Just 146 years ago yesterday, the episode known as “The Burning” drew to a close in the Shenandoah Valley. Gen. Phil Sheridan had cut a swathe from Augusta County, north into Rockingham, Page, and Shenandoah Counties before coming to a halt around Strasburg, Virginia. No doubt, the devastation to the “breadbasket of the Confederacy” was […]

How did the doctor “take care” of the witch?

October 8, 2010 by

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Just thinking back to how the doctor “saw to it” that the witch that “cursed” my great-great grandmother would be “in hell by morning.” Frankly, we will probably never know his method, and will wonder about the wide range of possibilities. Still, Samuel Kercheval did mention a couple of methods by which one could “cure… […]

Why “Cenantua”?

October 6, 2010 by

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I love this time of year. It’s a chilly day, the sky is overcast… … I have a fire in the wood stove… … and a relaxing cup of cappuccino in my manly-man Mickey Mouse coffee mug (what else??!!) is close at-hand. Feels like a good time to sit down and write… just wish I […]

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