Browsing All Posts filed under »“Shuffled” CW memory«


February 2, 2009 by


Just for the fun of it, I just spent some time in the census records again. I noticed that the 1870 and 1880 census records online at the UVa site provide stats for the states of birth. So, considering the talk about carpetbaggers in a few places in the blogosphere, I figured I would run […]

Excellent discussion about Civil War memory and some issues pertaining to the “read-write” nature of blogging

January 29, 2009 by


I know many of the readers here are actually “travelers” who frequently make their way through Kevin’s Civil War Memory blog to my blog, but for those who do not make that virtual journey, check out Kevin’s posts (with comments) from yesterday and today (and even the day before). There is some great discussion going […]

Some thoughts on Lee-Jackson Day

January 17, 2009 by


It is fine to both privately and, to a degree, publicly reflect upon the lives of historical persons. It fulfills various needs of the living. Look at a historical person (or persons) and consider the part of the historical person’s character, actions, etc., and consider how one may take meaning from these reflections. For some, […]

What’s really (no, I mean REALLY) the problem with modern Civil War reenactments?

January 14, 2009 by


Noting the recent post by Kevin over at Civil War Memory, I figured I’d toss out some thoughts about reenacting. First, YES, I have reenacted. I started back in 1981, and then, in the midst of high school, other things became more important to a teenage boy (go figure). Then, I crept back into it […]

May I paraphrase you… out of context… General Jackson?

January 6, 2009 by


Looking through the unit history for the Staunton Artillery yesterday (for something pertaining to a post over at BullRunnings), I came across a quote that sounded familiar. Then I realized that it was from a Gods & Generals conversation between “General Jackson” and “Captain Smith.” Remember? It was one held at the artillery position (Ricketts’?), […]

Where historical fact combined with fabrication (fiction) just presented a problem

December 29, 2008 by


As much as I hate to steamroller my own posts by double-posting (twice in the same day… truly, not among “best practices” in blogging), this story is just far more interesting than to just let it lay for a day. Call this an “historical memory watchdog” moment… This story about fabricating portions of recent proposed […]

The return of Confederate battleflags and the concerns of Union veterans… and others

December 27, 2008 by


I came across the image (originally published June 25, 1887) that follows below several weeks ago and I think, for anyone who knows the complex history of returning Civil War flags to their “homes,” this is an interesting cartoon. Of course, without a little background behind the cartoon, it might be meaningless for some who look at it […]

Historical “memory”

December 23, 2008 by


Noting a post elsewhere, I thought that perhaps it might be interesting to take a deeper look at what it means when one says “Civil War Memory.” However, before getting to “Civil War Memory,” it might be best to start off with basic historical “memory.” Historical “memory” is an interesting thing to consider. Specifically, I’m […]

Civil War “forgetfulness?” Ummm, sure… so “where did the love go?”

December 1, 2008 by


Noting a remark in a post made on Richard William’s blog that demonstrates Richard’s belief that saying “Civil War ‘forgetfulness'” is more appropriate than saying “Civil War ‘memory'” (I would argue that both “forgetfulness” and “memory” have valid places in understanding the way people reflect on the war, but that will come in another post), something came to mind. […]

Civil War Memory is not limited to “Civil War Confederate Memory”

November 29, 2008 by


Over the past nine months, I’ve spent some time focusing on problems with “memory” of the Civil War, but have limited it to problems with memory in those who look favorably on all things Confederate. I’ve focused on the new-era Confederate remembrance movement because, having once been a part of it, I am much more familiar […]

Pilgrims, Plymouth, Jamestown and a seemingly odd connection with the Civil War

November 25, 2008 by


O.K., this may seem wayyyy off topic, but it really isn’t. In one of the comments made in response to yesterday’s post, I made a remark that was based on something I saw in 2006 as an official release (General Order #5, to be exact) from the (then) top official of the S.C.V. The remark referred (I’m paraphrasing, but […]

Lost Cause Mythology… Rev War Mythology

November 24, 2008 by


For the first time in months, I decided to finally turn on History and watch a couple of episodes of The Revolution this evening. After watching two hours worth, I started to realize a few things… or maybe re-realize a few things. First, there was discussion about the Paul Revere myth… not much, but enough […]

“Neo-Unionists” ???

November 20, 2008 by


I’m wired-in to a couple mail lists out there and recently I saw the phrase “neo-Unionist” surface. I know why the phrase might be used, but I’m not totally convinced that it’s a valid way to label a select number of folks. Maybe “Won-Causers” might be more appropriate for some folks, but I’m not convinced on the […]

In an effort to separate fact from fiction

November 15, 2008 by


Just shifting gears a bit this evening and focusing on the complications of Civil War-era memory at the level of a small community. By no means is the following some earth-shattering historical finding, but I use it here to give an example of how we should take care in interpreting what we read… and what is […]

“Imagined memory” and stereotypes as side-effects of Civil War-era art?

November 13, 2008 by


In response to a comment yesterday, I wrote: … when you have art that is created, not out of interpretation of real events, but based on how an artist imagines an historical person may have reacted in an unreal or imagined scenario, then you have an “imagined presentation.” Is it, at that point really historical art, […]

Some thoughts on Civil War art

November 12, 2008 by


Noting three different posts (here, here and here) in three different blogs about this print by Mort Kunstler, I thought I’d chime in with some thoughts of my own. Are the criticisms really attacks on Southern heritage (also known by some of having some absolute prerequisite of being Confederate heritage) or is it just that some folks […]

“Us,” “them,” and “we” in Civil War memory

November 7, 2008 by


Just a quick follow-up to yesterday’s post, and considering a comment made, I like to think back to something an old friend once said. It seems rather appropriate considering it was two years ago this month that this old friend, John L. Heatwole, passed away. The author of “The Burning,” John was often perplexed over the […]

And the election results show…

November 4, 2008 by


… that in 1860, the election results map was much more colorful than the election results maps of today! In all seriousness, it is interesting to see how the upper South was not in agreement with the lower South as to the best presidential candidate for 1860. It looks like all those warnings we saw about a secession-leaning […]

The State of this Blog

November 2, 2008 by


In the wake of the digital history-focused discussions (here and here) of last week, I figured it was time to check the stats for this blog. Though it did not really go active until February 21, 2008, I actually opened the blog site on November 3, 2007. So, though it has been an “active blog” […]

Are you sure your Confederate ancestor even wanted to be a Confederate?

November 1, 2008 by


On average, very few of us know what our ancestors actually thought regarding events within their own time. Regretfully, because of this some researchers begin to speculate because they want some sort of definitive explanation behind what they do find in their research. “Gray” or indefinite history is simply not acceptable to some, so there […]

What is the South and who is really attacking it?

October 31, 2008 by


When considering the study of Civil War memory, I read regularly, and with great interest, the stories about Southern culture being under attack. What’s even more interesting is when Southern culture is defined by certain people through Confederate symbology (e.g., the Confederate flag, monuments, heroes, etc.). Is it, therefore, to be assumed that Confederate symbology […]

The last time a presidential candidate came to Harrisonburg, Virginia

October 29, 2008 by


I was a bit envious of the jump that the A. Lincoln blog got on me in posting something about the historical significance of Barack Obama’s visit to Harrisonburg, Virginia. If you aren’t aware, the last time a presidential candidate came to Harrisonburg was in 1860, with a visit by Stephen Douglas! In regard to […]

Can “The Burning” in the Shenandoah Valley be considered “total war?”

October 29, 2008 by


I just read Chris Wehner’s most recent post, American Civil War Educators Teaching Myths, at Blog 4 History, and was particularly interested in the remark about Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. Without a doubt, the devastation left in the wake of Gen. Philip Sheridan’s move through the Valley in late September and early October 1864 was […]

A philosophy worth taking to heart

October 26, 2008 by


Since this is my 101st post, I think it is fitting to take time to reflect on the beginnings of this blog. Before I made the leap into the Civil War blogosphere, I created an annotated bibliography focused on the practice of digital history. From all that I found, one item in particular stuck with me. Writing about potential of history […]

Historial analysis and the example of the Haynes-Beylor Murder

October 25, 2008 by


I’ll say it again… the Haynes-Beylor story as I first posted it, if I were to have left it alone, could be considered “shock history.” As a stand-alone story, it left many questions that remained unanswered. It would be irresponsible for an historian to leave a story like this, posted without analysis. The investigative work […]

More on the Haynes-Beylor Murder

October 21, 2008 by


I’m back! Now it’s time to reflect on my post of 3 October. When I posted the story, I was thinking two things. First, as a stand-alone story, how does this tale of the Haynes-Beylor murder compare to the way that some other folks like to tell history. I take, as an example, Cisco’s book, War Crimes Against Southern […]

Is History Doomed to the “Arts & Humanities?”

September 27, 2008 by


I’ve been thinking, and… considering recent practice in Digital History and the study of “Historical Memory,” maybe History doesn’t need to be limited to B.A. and M.A. tracks. First, with the expansion of Digital History, perhaps, if the instruction in Digital History practice goes beyond how to use HTML, XHTML, XML, Dreamweaver, blogs as a data-dump, etc., […]

“The Party of Lincoln!”… um… or is it really?

September 26, 2008 by


I’m not going into who is right or who is wrong politically in my blog because that is not what this blog is about. However, in terms of Civil War era Memory… let’s call this a hodge-podge of thoughts from the “for what it’s worth” file… … when a Republican presidential candidate proclaims that he is […]

Confederate Remembrance… a right or a privilege?

September 26, 2008 by


I was going to post something else about layers in flags, but I just lost interest in that. Instead, I’m going to pose a question… Is Confederate remembrance a right or a privilege? No, seriously… (and this demands serious and thoughtful answers… not rants). At what point did some of those who partake in Confederate remembrance […]

“Layers” of symbolism in the Confederate flag

September 24, 2008 by


I just responded to a reader’s comments about the Confederate flag. It made me revisit something that I had discussed with someone else in the not so distant past. What is the problem with the Confederate flag, today? To some, my take on it might sound over-simplistic, but I see the problem as “layers.” The flag has historical […]


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