Browsing All posts tagged under »West Virginia«

“This guy’s been very controversial from time to time”

May 31, 2011 by

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From the Charleston  (West Virginia) Gazette: CHARLESTON, W.Va. — In its first meeting since half of its citizen members resigned in protest, the West Virginia Sesquicentennial Commission Tuesday awarded four community program grants totaling $11,160 — but tabled one funding request because of the event’s controversial keynote speaker. The Guyandotte Civil War Days festival committee […]

May 14, 1861… Day 2 of the First Wheeling Convention

May 14, 2011 by

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I would be remiss if I made no mention of western Virginians in their efforts, during this time, 150 years ago. Of course, I also find it ironic that this weekend marks the 147th anniversary of the Battle of New Market… in which I can claim kin on both sides… two in the 62nd Virginia […]

The part of the story that Strother would not enjoy…

April 30, 2011 by

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While we saw this morning, in an earlier post, where Strother encountered Virginia militia troops from Berkeley and Jefferson counties, hoping for a reversal on secession in Virginia, we also see these two letters (courtesy of the Staunton Vindicator, April 26, 1861); one from Capt. Absalom Koiner (Augusta Rifles), and the other from Capt. William […]

Strother returns to the Valley, April 30 – May 2, 1861

April 30, 2011 by

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As D.H. Strother makes his way from Annapolis, back to Harper's Ferry, he finds "the plot has thickened" considerably. Remarking briefly about the batteries placed on the surrounding hills, and the new commander there (T.J. Jackson), his attention is focused on discussions with some of the Virginia troops there. Despite being in the ranks, not all are embracing secession, and, in fact, remain hopeful that Virginians would reject it in the referendum to come, later in May. ...[ Read more...]

About the right time, and, perhaps… at the right place

April 18, 2011 by

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Some people are into this sort of thing, and some aren’t, but for those of us who are… it’s cool to be at a particular place exactly 150 years to the day… and sometimes to within the hour or so… of an event in the Civil War. So, check your watches… the time is currently […]

A quest to know more about my Virginia ancestor who spoke out against secession

April 3, 2011 by

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As I mentioned yesterday, after posting a few items focused on anti-secession rhetoric in Virginia (during this time of the year, 150 years ago) this past week, I began thinking again about an ancestor of mine who also spoke out against secession at this same time. John Shuler (1815-1908) was a well-to-do farmer in Grove […]

Remember the Alamo! 175 years ago today.

March 6, 2011 by

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There was, indeed, a Robert Moore in the Alamo when it fell, 175 years ago today. I remember reading his name on the list of those lost there, when I visited that sacred ground in Texas, a few years ago. I doubt that the Alamo’s Robert B. Moore is any relation(*), but he was born […]

An amazing family discovery

February 5, 2011 by

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Going to divert focus here for just a bit; the reason being a recent unique find pertaining to my ancestry. Before I spill the beans, I figure I better set the stage. About 17 years ago, I started learning about another branch of my family tree… the McKinney and Quigley family lines. After growing up […]

Complex connections

November 22, 2010 by

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I saw this today, and the first thing I thought was, “oh, I bet Harry would be interested in this”… The thing is, I was looking for the headstones of David Hunter Strother’s (aka Porte Crayon… or, around these parts, simply, “The Porte“) parents. Well, this stone was not ten feet from John Strother’s stone… […]

Sunday afternoons with “The Porte”, Part VIII

October 17, 2010 by

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Continuing from Strother’s last… On Monday, 22d of April, the excitement still continued, the mobs occasionally breaking into shops in search of arms. The battle of Cockeysville did not take place as was expected. The Pennsylvanians, who were for the most part unarmed and altogether unprepared for a warlike encounter, had received warning of the […]

We interupt this broadcast… Strother on Brown’s Raid

October 17, 2010 by

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I missed the opportunity during the 150th anniversary of the raid, but thought some might enjoy reading what David Hunter Strother (aka “Porte Crayon” or, here, known as “The Porte”) had to say about the John Brown incident. On the morning of the 17th… 151 years ago today… we find Strother in his office in […]

Sunday afternoons with “The Porte”, Part VII

October 10, 2010 by

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What?! Did you think the entire month was going to be dedicated to ghosts, witches, and the generally eerie? On and off since May, I’ve been transcribing David Hunter Strother‘s “Personal Recollections of the Civil War. By a Virginian” as originally published in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, beginning in June 1866. Though I don’t transcribe […]

One of my finds while in Kansas City

September 15, 2010 by

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No, not Civil War-related, but family-related… I had just finished visiting the National World War I Museum, and having spotted the Spanish-American War Monument, I drove over to it to snap a shot or two. But then, I saw this monument on a hill within site of the Span-Am monument. Intrigued, I took a walk […]

Personal recollections of the Civil War. By a Virginian. (D.H. Strother) [Installment 6]

September 12, 2010 by

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Returning to where I left off (my September 4, 2010/fifth installment of D.H. Strother’s “Recollections”)… April 19. – On going down into the town this morning I found that there had been considerable accessions to the State forces, seven or eight hundred having arrived during the night and morning, while as many more were reported […]

Personal recollections of the Civil War. By a Virginian. (D.H. Strother) [Installment 5]

September 4, 2010 by

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Returning to where I left off (my August 1, 2010/fourth installment of D.H. Strother’s “Recollections”)… The troops were now marching up the southern slope of the hill, since called Bolivar Heights, the crest of which was covered with pine woods and dense thickets of undergrowth, and furnished a favorable position from which to resist their […]

Personal recollections of the Civil War. By a Virginian. (D.H. Strother) [Installment 4]

August 1, 2010 by

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Returning to where I left off (my June 1, 2010/third installment of D.H. Strother’s “Recollections”), when Strother was present for the actions leading up to the taking of Harper’s Ferry by Virginia militia… and when he encountered “old friends” who were partaking in the endeavor… As these gentlemen had unadvisedly, perhaps, communicated their plans to […]

Personal recollections of the Civil War. By a Virginian. (D.H. Strother) [Installment 3]

June 1, 2010 by

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Continued from Installment 2… … Although this people has been chiefly occupied in talking politics for eighty years or more, I can not perceive that they have made any advance toward enlightenment on the subject. Not one man in ten of those I meet seems to have the slightest idea of where his duty or […]

Feeling rather “Porte’ish”

May 7, 2010 by

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As anyone who reads this blog and my Southern Unionists Chronicles Blog (and sees my profile pic on Twitter… and occasional profile pic in FB) knows… I’m a big follower of David Hunter Strother (aka “Porte Crayon”)… and for some time, I’ve been wanting to transcribe the first portion of his “Personal Recollections of the […]

The Loyal Ladies of Winchester, Virginia

January 19, 2010 by

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As one who is particularly interested in information about Southern Unionists in the Shenandoah Valley, this image truly ranks among those rich discoveries found at places where I would have never anticipated. Regretfully, it’s hard to make out what the flag looked like (it also doesn’t help when I can’t use a flash!), specifically, but, […]

Status of Southern Unionists Chronicles

January 6, 2010 by

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Yes, it’s still active. Until today, I haven’t posted anything in months, but reader activity has been on and off, and, when there are comments, the discussion has proven enjoyable. What I like most is hearing from those who are descended from Southern Unionists and “can handle the truth.” It’s really refreshing. True, I get […]

Marker of the week in HMDB

March 1, 2009 by

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As I mentioned last week, I’ve been contributing some marker data to the Historic Markers Database. It’s a lot of fun, especially for someone who likes to set up tour guides and virtual tours among existing markers and locations where there should be markers. In the instance of recording the “Four Locks” marker on the C&O […]

A white man remembers slavery in the Shenandoah Valley

February 3, 2009 by

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I was wondering if I could interest the present generation by giving them a little of the history of antebellum days of slavery and how some things were done in by-gone days – things that I know did really happen. Now all I shall tell of will be done without doing violence to the truth […]

State-by-state comparison of secession referendum numbers

December 9, 2008 by

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Being just plain curious about the secession referendum in other states, I started looking-up the numbers a short time ago, and what I found surprised me. Texas, Tennessee, and Virginia appear to be the only states to actually allow the public to voice their opinion on the idea of secession. In Texas, the vote was […]

Southern Unionists as traitors to the Confederacy?

June 11, 2008 by

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Recently, I read something about somebody portraying Gen. George H. Thomas at living histories and some people referring to him as a traitor to his own people. Really, I find that a very odd statement to make regarding people of the South who preferred to remain loyal to the United States. While it’s true that […]