Browsing All posts tagged under »Washington County Maryland«

Waiting for picket duty… Loudoun Heights

January 9, 2014 by

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Today, I’m thinking about seven troopers from Co. B, of Major Henry Cole’s 1st Potomac Home Brigade (Maryland) Cavalry… James Draper Moore, Walter Scott Myers, John Newcomber, Isaiah Nicewander, Abraham L. Sossey, George W. Weaver, and David Hamilton Wolf. Six of these men were waiting to go on picket duty, on this day, 150 year […]

Another assist to Southern Unionists, under the Bowman and Tucker Acts

September 13, 2013 by

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I’ll get back to my current run on the discussion of literacy and literature in the antebellum Shenandoah Valley, but, as I promised… still having a deep and dedicated interest in Southern Unionism…  I know I’ve mentioned it before, that though a Southern Loyalist Claim might be barred or disallowed, it doesn’t necessarily mean that it […]

Literacy rates in the antebellum Shenandoah Valley

September 12, 2013 by

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*UPDATE: Actually, though they weren’t part of the 1860 census, the numbers of those who could not read and/or write were tallied in the census for both 1840 and 1850. I will probably tally the numbers from that census to compare with the numbers shown in the 1870 census. I’m sorry to say, there are […]

Who was this Capt. Summers who fell at White House Farm?

July 9, 2013 by

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I first encountered a reference to Capt. Summers (see yesterday’s post in which I mention his death) when I was looking into the names of the different G.A.R. posts in this general area. It so happens that George D. Summers Post No. 13 was out of Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. There is, by the way, […]

Who was free black Isaac Dunn?

May 8, 2013 by

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There are certain things that sit there… in my mind… unanswered in my quest to understand better my ancestors and the people around them… and this is one of them. He appears but once, as far as I can tell, in the census records. Isaac Dunn was listed, on September 6, 1860, as residing with […]

The alarm goes out in Clear Spring, 150 years ago today

September 10, 2012 by

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Following-up on my post from Saturday, I look back again at the village of Clear Spring. I have nothing to show how my ancestors felt… there and in nearby Four Locks. Instead, I rely on what is available… not so much as a reflection of what they also felt, but to add another dimension to the […]

Across the Potomac and into Maryland

September 7, 2012 by

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It’s where my mind has been for the past few days… Since September 4th, I’ve been thinking about the Confederates crossing the Potomac and moving into Maryland, and how long the news might have taken to reach my family members, just to the west of Hagerstown. My third great grandmother Kate Moore lived near Four […]

Maryland’s “Treason Law” of 1862 & the “sharp tune” it played between a Southern Unionist and his Confederate son

September 2, 2012 by

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I’m a little late on this one, and had intended to post something about it in March, when on or near the actual Sesqui anniversary, but… better late than never, I suppose. On top of that, having a severe hankering for western Maryland-related content (it’s been quite a while since I last posted anything about […]

Romney, 150 years ago today: the first in a series of “blood clashes”

October 26, 2011 by

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It’s barely a blip on the radars when it comes to Sesquicentennial commemoration/remembrance, but on this day, 150 years ago, some of my kin… some in blue, and others in gray… may well have exchanged shots. No, it wasn’t in one of the big battles, but, rather, a small scrap that resulted in Gen. B.F. […]

149 years ago today, but, what about a snapshot of 150 years ago today? Life one year before THE battle.

September 17, 2011 by

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I encourage those who are able, to take advantage of all that is going on at Antietam National Battlefield, this weekend. Regretfully, I won’t be able to make it… though I most certainly plan on being there this time next year (and might even take a little time to hop across the Potomac next weekend, […]

Maryland’s Southern Unionists continue to fill the ranks

August 28, 2011 by

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THE HOME BRIGADE.— The work organizing the Regiments, ordered to be raised by the Secretary of War as a Home Brigade in Western Maryland, is rapidly progressing. In Allegany county one regiment has been nearly completed, nine of the ten companies having been raised, with the assurance that the tenth one will be speedily forthcoming. In […]

Random adventures in the field

August 20, 2011 by

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It’s often the way I roll… I know the general geographic area where I’ll venture to, but where I end up is about as predictable as the roll of a twelve-sided die. I drive, and then, when something catches my attention, I stop, and try to get a sense of the story of that place. […]

Newspaper ads as peaceful moments in an otherwise chaotic world

July 27, 2011 by

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I spend a good deal of time sifting through newspapers in search of articles that uniquely describe events of the war, or offer perspectives not found elsewhere. Even so, as I scroll through the microfilm, I don’t bypass the advertisements. There seems to be a peculiar, perhaps ironic, peace in most of the ads. It’s […]

Maryland Unionists address the matter of Federal “interference”

July 23, 2011 by

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“Old Maryland’s Wrongs” This is a favorite expression with the rebels of the South, who tried but failed to seduce our State from her loyalty to the Union. The other day, on the occasion of the presentation of a piece of secession bunting to the Baltimore Regiment in the rebel army at Richmond, Mr. JEFFERSON DAVIS, who […]