Browsing All posts tagged under »Virginia«

Do the little things matter?

June 8, 2013 by

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It My concern in bringing this up might seem trivial to some, but it’s not. I assure you. Just stop for a minute and consider a couple of things… keeping in mind, of course, the Civil War era. When someone is identified as an abolitionist… what do you envision? When someone is identified as being […]

Taking Southern Unionism on the road

April 11, 2012 by

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While I’ve been writing a good deal about it over the past 5 1/2 years, I’ve only made one presentation about Southern Unionism… that being a response to a call for papers. The presentation, made at Frederick Community College, in Frederick Maryland (Fall, 2006), was largely focused on my masters thesis… which was actually still […]

O.K., strike Washington-Lincoln Day… what about JUST “Lincoln Day” in Virginia?

January 29, 2012 by

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I really didn’t want this to go to a point-counterpoint discussion (as there is a growing number of blogs bringing this to our attention; most recently, Brooks Simpson’s “Battlin’ Bloggers” post), but I’ve got some additional thoughts. Yes, last week, I expressed my thoughts that I like the idea (and that hasn’t changed) of recognizing […]

Confederates, Southern Unionists, and… The Waltons?!

October 23, 2011 by

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To be clear… I’ve always been a fan of the Waltons… though I prefer the first three seasons over the rest. Not only was it based largely on the writings of a Virginian, but also focused on a fictional Virginia family under the shadow of the Blue Ridge (albeit, on the eastern side). I still […]

How a Shenandoah Valley “apple-butter boil” beat “a South Georgia shinding all to pieces”

October 9, 2011 by

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It is, after all, October, here in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley… and with that comes not only reflections on the past (“heritage” festivals abound!), but also a good deal of apple-butter making. Regretfully, much of the ceremony surrounding the traditional apple-butter boils have long been forgotten, or have simply been cast aside as an unnecessary […]

What causes (yes, that reads as plural) motivated Southerners to support the Confederacy

August 11, 2011 by

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Ever since I found this paragraph (I’ve used it in two blog posts, the most recent being here), I’ve not been able to let it go easily. Though I’m not saying these motivations alone [see below] are to be considered the end-all list, I do believe they form the significant categories for the motivations.  When […]

Off the “warpath”, and on the river

July 17, 2011 by

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This morning being the way it is today (almost early September-like), I find my mind in other places than working toward the First Battle of Manassas/Bull Run, or focusing on some aspect of war, whether that be the Civil War or the First World War. Rather, I’m in the mindset, today, of the Valley before […]

Tangents… and looking for “intersections”, part 1

June 12, 2011 by

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This past week, I’ve found myself distracted from the standard Sesqui followings. Maybe it’s because I just haven’t felt like there’s much to say, regarding what happened at this time (almost mid-June), 150 years ago. Not to say that there wasn’t a lot going on at that time… Anyway, as I am one to go […]

From June 4, 1861, an Ohio paper opines… Virginia Playing the Fool (?)

June 4, 2011 by

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Courtesy of the Cleveland (Ohio) Herald, we have this small clip from June 4, 1861 (via Dickinson College’s House Divided blog). The title (of the original document) reads, “Virginia Playing the Foot”, but I feel that this was an error in printing, and that they (the Herald) meant “Virginia Playing the Fool”. Anyway, I find […]

Luray’s witness tree

June 3, 2011 by

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Since we’re in mourning for the Jackson Prayer Oak (see here, and here… and yes, I’m a tree hugger of sorts… especially when it comes to witness trees), I figured it was a perfect time to talk about another witness tree, but further down the Valley, in Page County. While this tree didn’t witness any […]

Eastman Johnson’s “Union Soldiers Accepting a Drink”

May 25, 2011 by

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Just stumbled across this on the Web today, and found it so interesting that I just wanted to share. First, note who is providing the Union soldiers with a drink. Second, I wonder, is that the Blue Ridge in the background? Wonder if this is an image from Johnson’s experiences east of the Blue Ridge […]

Virginia Unionist Goodhart continues: more on the referendum on secession

May 23, 2011 by

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Picking up from yesterday’s post on the referendum, and, as promised in a post a few weeks back, more about the referendum on secession in Virginia from Briscoe Goodhart… … and as by these troops the United States Government property at Harper’s Ferry had been seized and the immense navy yard at Norfolk had been […]

Hmmm… about that referendum on secession in Virginia

May 22, 2011 by

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Tomorrow marks the day, 150 years ago, when Virginians were given the chance to vote on secession… although, really, it didn’t mean a great deal considering the mobilization that had taken place, and… let’s not forget the Commonwealth’s offer for Richmond to be the capital of the Confederacy… before the referendum. Really, it was a […]

The mustering of troops in Virginia… revisiting enlistments in the militia

May 18, 2011 by

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It’s the middle of May 1861… and Virginians are flocking to units across the state… In some areas of Virginia, the mustering of troops for Virginia units (ultimately assigned to the cause of the Confederacy) began as early as the day the news of secession hit the streets. No doubt, some were quite eager to […]

May 14, 1861… Day 2 of the First Wheeling Convention

May 14, 2011 by

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I would be remiss if I made no mention of western Virginians in their efforts, during this time, 150 years ago. Of course, I also find it ironic that this weekend marks the 147th anniversary of the Battle of New Market… in which I can claim kin on both sides… two in the 62nd Virginia […]

Letcher, the politician in search of votes, distances himself from the Ruffner Pamphlet

May 14, 2011 by

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I figured that I would follow-up on my post from this morning, and briefly tackle the continued role that the Ruffner Pamphlet played, up through the governor’s race in Virginia, in 1859. During the Democratic nomination run-off for the governorship of Virginia, in 1859, John Letcher may have regretted his stand on the Ruffner Pamphlet […]

Another Southerner who wanted to free slaves… but…

May 14, 2011 by

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… his motivations weren’t centered on freeing slaves as an issue of morality. Dr. Henry Ruffner was well-educated (Washington College, and Princeton, where he received his D.D.), and headed several Presbyterian pastorates in Rockbridge County, Virginia (not to mention one near his family’s salt works in the Kanawha Valley). He was also a fairly active […]

The Virginian…

May 11, 2011 by

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Yes, that’s correct… another Southern-born boy in command of UNION troops at Gettysburg. Newton initially commanded the 3rd Division of the 6th Corps coming into the battle, but commanded the 1st Corps after Meade came onto the scene. Originally, Doubleday replaced Reynolds after he had been killed, but, Meade replaced Doubleday the Virginian Newton (incidentally, Doubleday and […]

Ridin’ a raid…

May 10, 2011 by

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It’s quieted down considerably here since the latter part of April, but rest assured, things will pick up again soon, as we move toward the middle of May (shadowing the increase in activity in “these parts”, in 1861). Tomorrow, I’m going to divert a bit from the Sesquicentennial line of features, and take those who […]

All is not as it may first appear… the poetess and her work

May 1, 2011 by

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Cornelia Jane Mathews Jordan is an excellent example of one of the many paths that sprung forth from basic Southern Unionism. While one piece of her work reflects a strong affection to the Union and the flag, her opinions were not concrete, and were greatly influenced by her affiliations and the situations that she encountered, during the course of the war. ...[ Read more...]

The part of the story that Strother would not enjoy…

April 30, 2011 by

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While we saw this morning, in an earlier post, where Strother encountered Virginia militia troops from Berkeley and Jefferson counties, hoping for a reversal on secession in Virginia, we also see these two letters (courtesy of the Staunton Vindicator, April 26, 1861); one from Capt. Absalom Koiner (Augusta Rifles), and the other from Capt. William […]

Henry A. Wise… traitor to Virginia?

April 20, 2011 by

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So, did Henry A. Wise betray Virginia? Give it some thought. Yes, we can see that Virginia was riding a fine line. There were secessionists; there were Unionists… and among the Unionists, we can see a wide range of what it meant to be a Unionist. We have the unconditional Unionists, who were not budging […]

Winchester to Halltown

April 18, 2011 by

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By dusk, the Virginia troops arrived in Winchester, returned the horses to the farmers, and begins to wait for rail cars to haul them on the Winchester and Potomac Railroad, 28 miles, to Halltown. From there, the guns would be moved to Bolivar Heights, arriving at about 4 a.m. on April 19. General Kenton Harper, […]

About the right time, and, perhaps… at the right place

April 18, 2011 by

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Some people are into this sort of thing, and some aren’t, but for those of us who are… it’s cool to be at a particular place exactly 150 years to the day… and sometimes to within the hour or so… of an event in the Civil War. So, check your watches… the time is currently […]