Browsing All posts tagged under »Stonewall Brigade«

News in the Valley: The Army of Northern Virginia’s need for shoes

February 3, 2014 by

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Ever since Craig posted about shoes last week, I’ve been thinking about posting something that might add another perspective on the need for shoes within the Army of Northern Virginia.  As Craig’s post points out, Lee was in need of leather, and if he could get the amount he needed, he could employ 500 from […]

Legacy lost – Valley men of the 54th Massachusetts at Wagner

July 17, 2013 by

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Tomorrow marks the day made famous by the movie Glory. It might be that we are only truly aware of it, on a larger scale, because of the movie (update: Craig’s got an excellent piece on the fight… and a word to the wise, just in case the movie made you think otherwise… the 54th wasn’t the […]

Passing of the last real child of the Stonewall Brigade(?)

April 29, 2013 by

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I’ve been seeing postings lately, mostly on Face Book, about the last four surviving children of Civil War veterans (actually, it focused on the last four just in Virginia alone… and I didn’t seem to catch that last part), and I added to each that I thought they were missing somebody. I’m sorry to say… […]

An evening with “Bud” Robertson, part 2

March 30, 2013 by

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The second great point that struck me while listening to Dr. Robertson was… in him, are we listening to the end of an era? He didn’t say anything about this… it’s just something that came to my mind. I think we are. Not only are we looking at one of the history community’s living connections […]

John Albert Racer of Page County… Southern Unionist?

September 2, 2012 by

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A friend of mine asked me if I thought his ancestor (John Albert Racer) might have been a Southern Unionist. He has a hunch he was, plus, there’s some pretty interesting stuff surrounding this fellow’s life in the war. For one, there’s a pretty cool story that comes out of Page County, about one of […]

Reflections on the Brawner Farm

August 28, 2012 by

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It’s usually not my practice to post things without giving them much thought (at least from what you, the reader can see in my words here… but I’m surely giving it thought “off-paper” or, considering the platform… “off-web”), but… in that this is almost 150 years to the hour since it began, this evening my […]

Has the Sesqui of the ’62 Shenandoah Valley Campaign fallen short?

June 7, 2012 by

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In writing about Turner Ashby yesterday, I kept thinking about (but wrote nothing of it) how all has gone, so far, in the Sesqui of the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1862, and feel that the 150th has served as a benchmark of sorts. I think when the Sesqui began, many of us in the CW blogosphere, asked if […]

Why would a Washington-Lincoln Day be significant to Virginia?

January 22, 2012 by

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Of course, my interests are a bit narrow in scope… being a native (and resident) of the Shenandoah Valley, I’m incredibly happy to see Virginia’s state legislature taking initiative in recognizing yet another Valley-connected Civil War personality in the proposed Washington-Lincoln Day. Think of it… first we have Jackson who lived here and made a […]

The Dam #5 Lockhouse: evidence of an effort from 150 years ago?

December 18, 2011 by

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So many of us go to battlefields and imagine the damage done by artillery, yet, are unable to see the impact on the ground. There is, however… here and there… evidence of damage done to structures. While not the site of intense artillery fire, the lockhouse at Dam #5, on the Potomac, may have the […]

Revisiting a family ghost story, from the Civil War…

October 31, 2011 by

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This appeared in a post last year, but, I like the story so much… Despite being part of a series of victories in 1862, the “Page Grays” of Co. H, 33rd Virginia Infantry, had seen their fair share of desertions (not, by any means, that the “Grays” were slackers, as the company also saw more than […]

“they’re not strangers… and they stay as they lay…”

September 13, 2011 by

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There’s something that struck me long ago, while watching Last of the Mohicans (the newest version), but not necessarily in relation to that time period. Specifically, I’m talking about the marking or remarking of graves of Civil War soldiers. We see it often, in instances where folks, today, wish to mark the graves of people […]

Prelude to Manassas: The “Affair at Falling Waters”

July 2, 2011 by

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There’s much talk today about Gettysburg, and I’m sure I’ll have a lot to say about that in two years, but… 150 years ago on this day (morning), while probing toward the Potomac River, just south of Williamsport, Maryland, the 5th Virginia Infantry, along with the 1st Rockbridge Artillery… and even a portion of the […]

An execution… a ghost’s last hymn… and a curse fulfilled(?)

October 31, 2010 by

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As I’ve mentioned several times in my postings throughout the month, October brings to mind stories of witches and ghosts, but one ghost story captures my thinking frequently throughout the month. I suppose, one can almost say that it literally “haunts” me. The story actually developed over time, with each piece of information I uncovered […]

So, finally… this Confederate vet and the witch…

October 2, 2010 by

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    One of my great-great grandfathers, Charles Robert “Tanner” Hillard, was born on October 3, 1844 (in fact, that will be 166 years ago… tomorrow), a son of Jacob (1784-1864) and Phoebe Elliott Hilliard (ca. 1822-???). As for the Civil War part goes… Charles’ younger brother, Jacob, hired himself out as a substitute (for […]

Confederate ancestor analysis #3 – Joseph Richards

September 2, 2009 by

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Joseph Richards was born in 1833 (the third of seven children) to Aquilla and “Millie” Keyser Richards. Aquilla was of Welsh descent (the family having entered Pennsylvania in the late 1600s/early 1700s), while Millie was of German and English ancestry. In the 1850 census, after the death of his father, Aquilla (ca. 1804-ca. 1849), Joseph, […]

Are you sure your Confederate ancestor even wanted to be a Confederate?

November 1, 2008 by

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On average, very few of us know what our ancestors actually thought regarding events within their own time. Regretfully, because of this some researchers begin to speculate because they want some sort of definitive explanation behind what they do find in their research. “Gray” or indefinite history is simply not acceptable to some, so there […]

A Tale for Halloween

October 31, 2008 by

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Among the many stories that I gathered while conducting research for my thesis, there was one that caught my attention for more than one reason. I used a portion of the story for my thesis, as it was useful in documenting the activities of Confederate conscript hunters. The part that I did not use is […]

Can “The Burning” in the Shenandoah Valley be considered “total war?”

October 29, 2008 by

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I just read Chris Wehner’s most recent post, American Civil War Educators Teaching Myths, at Blog 4 History, and was particularly interested in the remark about Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. Without a doubt, the devastation left in the wake of Gen. Philip Sheridan’s move through the Valley in late September and early October 1864 was […]

Liberal history?… I wonder…

October 27, 2008 by

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Considering the recent exchange over this post in Richard Williams’ blog, I wonder… If working beyond James I. Robertson’s traditionalist approach to the Stonewall Brigade, if an historian dug a little deeper, what might the reaction be if the results of the study proved less than favorable/honorable? What if, for example, someone started examining the motivations of the soldiers in the brigade, […]

My point in posting the pension abstract… more on the way in which “Black Confederates” are “honored”

September 1, 2008 by

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Despite criticism of my motivations behind one of my most recent posts, posting what I did was not merely a matter of convenience in support of my argument. The material does support it, but that’s not the point. This is just laying out the facts as defined, not by me, but by the state and […]

Anxious for secesh; not so anxious to fight

April 11, 2008 by

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No, it wasn’t a standard feeling of those who voted for “secesh,” but I do think it’s worth mentioning (especially in the wake of the quick analysis of the referendum numbers) that some who were anxious for secession and likely voted for it in the referendum, weren’t so eager to defend the very “cause” that […]

Recalling another instance of “shuffled” Civil War “memory”

March 27, 2008 by

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Quick story today… A couple of years ago, I ran into a gentleman in the Shenandoah Valley who proudly announced to me that he had a sword used by his great-grandfather (Perry Francis Cave) in the Civil War. I was greatly interested and asked him his ancestor’s unit. That was not so readily available, but […]

More puzzlements over Civil War “memory”

March 8, 2008 by

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I’ve written about how I am puzzled over the way that those with no familial connections whatsoever have found “sympathetic connections” with one side or another in the Civil War. I’ve also written about how a person, descended from a Union soldier, had been left with a legacy of forgotten family participation in the war. However, today, I […]