Browsing All posts tagged under »Stephen A. Douglas«

“All we ask is to be left alone”

January 15, 2011 by

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I’m picking-up from where I left off in my last post… Regarding some of those who opposed secession, and continued to do so… it didn’t necessarily mean that they were ready to go to war against their neighbors and friends, in defense of their position. Instead, many preferred to be left alone. They simply didn’t […]

The 1860 Presidential vote in Washington County, Maryland

October 24, 2009 by

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As you may recall from my post from the other day, there was discussion about “Black Republicanism” playing a factor in the sweeping display of Unionism in the Clear Spring District. I mentioned in the same post, however, that only two votes were casts in the Clear Spring District for Lincoln. With that in mind, […]

And the election results show…

November 4, 2008 by

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… that in 1860, the election results map was much more colorful than the election results maps of today! In all seriousness, it is interesting to see how the upper South was not in agreement with the lower South as to the best presidential candidate for 1860. It looks like all those warnings we saw about a secession-leaning […]

On election day eve… Monday night, November 5, 1860

November 4, 2008 by

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As a follow-up to my two posts (Oct. 29 & 30) about Stephen Douglas’ visit to Staunton and Harrisonburg, Virginia, I was wondering… as Virginians stood on the eve of the election of 1860, what were their thoughts? Flipping through the “virtual stack” of digitized era newspapers, I find that we have access to copies of the Richmond Dispatch, Staunton’s […]

Stephen Douglas’ Speech at Harrisonburg

October 30, 2008 by

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Realizing that those with dial-up may have a hard time opening the pdf that I mentioned yesterday, I decided to post a transcription of the review of Douglas’ speech as printed in Staunton’s Republican Vindicator on September 7, 1860. Of course, Douglas made the speech at the Court House in Harrisonburg, on Monday, September 3, 1860. […]