Browsing All posts tagged under »Staunton«

“Submission is Ruin.”

April 10, 2011 by

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I’ll let a pro-secession paper in Virginia speak for itself… Nothing could be more preposterous, nothing more stupid, than the dogma that slavery is a curse to the country. On the contrary, the heaviest calamity that could befall any slave State on this continent, the greatest curse that an angry Providence could inflict upon the […]

A reason why Virginians might fear an alignment with the “Northern Confederacy”

March 29, 2011 by

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From the Staunton Vindicator, March 29, 1861: Mr. Bennett, one of the financial officers of the State [Virginia], has already called for an increase of 20 cents in the one hundred dollars on the present rate of taxation. If the policy of the submissionists is adopted, and Virginia becomes a part of the Northern Confederacy, her […]

Protect slavery or face “degredation and ruin.”

March 29, 2011 by

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Looking back 150 years ago, from the Shenandoah Valley… this comes from the Staunton Vindicator, March 29, 1861… The question is not “Union”. That is irretrievably, hopelessly broken up. No compromise of right–no palliation of wrong, or denunciation of its resistance, can restore its fallen columns. Nor can past glory reconcile to a future of degradation. The only […]

The Vindicator addresses the Spectator’s “doing harm” piece

February 15, 2011 by

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From the Republican Vindicator, February 15, 1861, in response to the piece I mentioned, =>here: The Spectator The Spectator, seeking an excuse to compliment its editor in the last issue of that paper, says it “understood that some of the extremists in this and the adjoining counties say that the Staunton Spectator is doing more […]

Newspapers that reveal something new to popular memory of the Civil War… perhaps…

February 6, 2011 by

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Once again (as can be seen in my post from Friday), I’ve been perusing the Valley of the Shadow site. My focus in that post on Friday was on the two papers in Staunton, Virginia, at this particular time (the first week of February), 150 years ago. One of those papers happened to support secession, […]

Virginia newspapers “doing harm” to sentiments of disunion

February 4, 2011 by

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As Ron Baumgarten pointed out in his post the other day over at “All Not So Quiet on the Potomac”, today marks the 150th anniversary of Virginians voting for delegates to the Virginia Convention of 1861. By the time of the vote, seven states from the deep South had seceded; Texas being the most recent, […]

On the notion that emancipation would eventually come in a free and independent Southern Confederacy

December 12, 2010 by

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With the title of this post in mind… this editorial comes from the Staunton Vindicator, December 14, 1860 (courtesy the Valley of the Shadow site). Now, I realize, as an editorial, it is, or may be, just one man’s opinion, but, there appear to be reflections of the attitudes of others. I’ve placed emphasis in […]

FYI… “ghosting” Staunton tonight

October 15, 2010 by

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More to follow… I hope.

Geotag test 2- Confederate section, Thornrose Cemetery

October 2, 2010 by

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Just a test of the Geotag feature, but, while I’m here… this section of land was used for burying both Union and Confederate dead who usually died while in the Confederate hospital that I just mentioned in the last post. The Union dead were later removed to the National Cemetery just to the east, and […]

A Virginia slave in pursuit of freedom

June 3, 2010 by

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I just finished reading something about John M. Washington, a slave who spent some time in Staunton, Virginia in the mid-1850s. To me, finding any account of a slave, for any amount of time in the Valley, is refreshing as it adds new dimensions to an understanding of what life was like here. Regretfully, I […]

The voice of the Southern people left unheard…

April 26, 2010 by

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Took a little “virtual walk” among some items in the Valley of the Shadow today and found quite a bit that was of interest, but wanted to throw these out for consideration… all from the Feb. 26, 1861 issue of the Staunton Spectator… The Natchez Courier “Contends that the people of Natchez were not in […]

Slavery justified… according to the Bible, or at least Joseph Ruggles Wilson’s interpretation of it

March 18, 2009 by

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I had forgotten all about this story until I came across it again last night… and that is particularly bad considering I included the story in my book about Staunton and Augusta County, Virginia in the Civil War. Nonetheless… President Woodrow Wilson’s (fyi, his full name was Thomas Woodrow Wilson) father, Joseph Ruggles Wilson (born in Steubenville, […]

In search of the Christmas tree in the Civil War era home

December 20, 2008 by

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Recently, while developing a two-part article for my newspaper column, I began thinking about our cultural understandings (or misunderstandings) of how the Christmas tree has developed in our historical memory. In terms of Christmas trees at the time of the Civil War, I was thinking specifically about the Christmas tree scenes from Gods & Generals. Was the […]

In an effort to separate fact from fiction

November 15, 2008 by

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Just shifting gears a bit this evening and focusing on the complications of Civil War-era memory at the level of a small community. By no means is the following some earth-shattering historical finding, but I use it here to give an example of how we should take care in interpreting what we read… and what is […]

On election day eve… Monday night, November 5, 1860

November 4, 2008 by

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As a follow-up to my two posts (Oct. 29 & 30) about Stephen Douglas’ visit to Staunton and Harrisonburg, Virginia, I was wondering… as Virginians stood on the eve of the election of 1860, what were their thoughts? Flipping through the “virtual stack” of digitized era newspapers, I find that we have access to copies of the Richmond Dispatch, Staunton’s […]

Stephen Douglas’ Speech at Harrisonburg

October 30, 2008 by

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Realizing that those with dial-up may have a hard time opening the pdf that I mentioned yesterday, I decided to post a transcription of the review of Douglas’ speech as printed in Staunton’s Republican Vindicator on September 7, 1860. Of course, Douglas made the speech at the Court House in Harrisonburg, on Monday, September 3, 1860. […]

The last time a presidential candidate came to Harrisonburg, Virginia

October 29, 2008 by

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I was a bit envious of the jump that the A. Lincoln blog got on me in posting something about the historical significance of Barack Obama’s visit to Harrisonburg, Virginia. If you aren’t aware, the last time a presidential candidate came to Harrisonburg was in 1860, with a visit by Stephen Douglas! In regard to […]