Browsing All posts tagged under »Staunton Virginia«

“Porte Crayon” in Harrisonburg, June 2, 1864

June 2, 2014 by

1

It’s been an extraordinarily busy past few months, and postings here have suffered mightily for it. That said, last night I happened to “catch-up” with David Hunter Strother, as the Federal army advanced up the Shenandoah Valley toward Staunton. As of June 2, Strother awoke (near New Market) to find his “fine bay horse” gone… […]

News in the Valley: The Army of Northern Virginia’s need for shoes

February 3, 2014 by

1

Ever since Craig posted about shoes last week, I’ve been thinking about posting something that might add another perspective on the need for shoes within the Army of Northern Virginia.  As Craig’s post points out, Lee was in need of leather, and if he could get the amount he needed, he could employ 500 from […]

“Poor deluded African, he leaves his kind Master…”

January 29, 2014 by

2

Note: The post got ahead of me, just a bit. Prior to posting this I planned to add one more comment… which I’ve since added at the end of this post. From page 1, column 2 of Staunton’s Republican Vindicator, January 29, 1864: We have been informed by a gentleman who has lately returned from Winchester […]

Grain, whiskey and a question of sovereignty – Shenandoah, January 1864

January 25, 2014 by

6

Note: Conscious of the typical in-and-out Web surfer, I figured I better give a heads-up that there’s a long line of quotes that follow below, extracted from the Staunton Spectator… and as regular readers know, this isn’t typically my style. I was just fascinated by the series of whiskey articles that appeared in the paper, […]

Bad weather, a slow advance, and Gilmor’s “raid” on Burner’s

December 17, 2013 by

3

By the 17th of December, 1863, Federal progress was… not very progressive. William Beach, of the 1st New York remembered that “it was raining hard and freezing”. Despite the weather, Boyd’s main body moved up the pike, with the 1st taking the Back Road, to Columbia Furnace. There’s an anecdote in Beach’s book that mentions […]

Shenandoah Sesqui… the Federals on the march, and resentment among the Valley’s own… December 11, 1863

December 11, 2013 by

1

From the Federal perspective, there doesn’t seem to be a great deal to comment on, regarding the Federal line of march as of December 11, 1863. Writing (apparently in the morning) from Burmach (regretfully, no… I haven’t figured out where this us just yet), just three miles from Berryville, Wells  noted that he had arrived […]

Private developer denies access to former state maintained cemetery

February 18, 2012 by

27

The soles of my shoes have been on many a cemetery in Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, in search of kin… Just this morning I decided to try to visit the cemetery where a distant family member of mine is buried… and was told I could not do so. This was a personal first… […]

Imboden arrives in Staunton

April 17, 2011 by

0

Approximately 6 p.m., April 17, 1861… Imboden arrives in Staunton to find the Staunton Artillery and Guard drawn up on the railroad platform, but word has found its way to many citizens (many, dedicated Staunton Vindicator readers, no doubt), and many civilians are crowded around the depot as well. A telegram awaits Imboden of the […]

“You were once… Governor… and we will take orders from you, sir.”

April 16, 2011 by

4

During the next few days of the Sesquicentennial, I’ll have a few things to say about what I believe to be a dark time in Virginia’s history. But, why? I’ll keep it simple. On April 15, John D. Imboden was summoned to Richmond, for a meeting with ex-Governor Henry A. Wise. They met on the […]

“Secession Intollerance”

April 1, 2011 by

0

The Staunton Spectator (March 26, 1861) reflects on a piece from the Petersburg Intelligencer: The intolerance of the immediate Secessionists, is without precedent in Virginia history. All men must think as they think, and act as they act, or suffer the penalty of being denounced as traitors to Virginia and Virginia’s institutions. As for ourselves, […]

John B. Baldwin on the threatened right(s?) of Virginians

March 31, 2011 by

4

From the Virginia Convention, Thursday, March 21, 1861… we catch Mr. Baldwin in the middle of his presentation to the members of the Convention (as documented by someone present)… She [Augusta County] was identified with every interest of the Commonwealth; and if there were extremes of opinion or prejudice in one quarter or another, Augusta […]

Valley of the Shadow Project and Civil War Memory

March 26, 2008 by

0

I had planned on posting about something to do with Southern Unionists today, but in the course of deciding exactly what I wanted to write about (and after a little Web navigation), I came across something that I wanted to pass along. Most in Civil War era studies are probably aware of the Valley of […]

Assumptions (maybe?… and hopefully not mine) and Civil War “memory”

March 20, 2008 by

10

Thanks to a recent comment, I’ve been made aware of an error. Well, at least it appears to be an error. There are two headstones in the Winchester National Cemetery in Winchester, Virginia that are mix-match in nature when it comes to data and design. Really, this is no great surprise. As I mentioned in […]