Browsing All posts tagged under »Staunton Spectator«

News in the Valley: The Army of Northern Virginia’s need for shoes

February 3, 2014 by

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Ever since Craig posted about shoes last week, I’ve been thinking about posting something that might add another perspective on the need for shoes within the Army of Northern Virginia.  As Craig’s post points out, Lee was in need of leather, and if he could get the amount he needed, he could employ 500 from […]

Civil liberties in the Shenandoah, January 1864

January 26, 2014 by

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Or, perhaps I should say… Civil liberties as reported on this day… 150 years ago, (and, this goes hand-in-hand, in that respect, with yesterday’s post) when the Staunton Spectator ran a piece (p. 2, column 3) previously (probably on Jan. 21) carried in the Richmond Whig: What brought this on? It was a matter of civil […]

Shenandoah Sesqui… the Federals on the march, and resentment among the Valley’s own… December 11, 1863

December 11, 2013 by

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From the Federal perspective, there doesn’t seem to be a great deal to comment on, regarding the Federal line of march as of December 11, 1863. Writing (apparently in the morning) from Burmach (regretfully, no… I haven’t figured out where this us just yet), just three miles from Berryville, Wells  noted that he had arrived […]

“They call me a traitor now”

April 23, 2011 by

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This poem (and, no, not written by the same author, whose poem I posted on April 21… and not to fret, I’ll be telling you more about the author of that poem, soon) comes from the Memphis Bulletin (as reprinted in the Staunton Spectator. You remember… the Unionist paper in that town…) April 23, 1861. […]

“Secession Intollerance”

April 1, 2011 by

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The Staunton Spectator (March 26, 1861) reflects on a piece from the Petersburg Intelligencer: The intolerance of the immediate Secessionists, is without precedent in Virginia history. All men must think as they think, and act as they act, or suffer the penalty of being denounced as traitors to Virginia and Virginia’s institutions. As for ourselves, […]

That hideous Yankee tariff!

March 31, 2011 by

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… and yet… A Southern gentleman who resides in Augusta, Ga., writes thus:–“If the South were merely let alone for six months, we would probably try at the next general election to get back. The new tariff will open both eyes and pockets; 3 to 4 cents per pound on cheese, 4 to 5 cents […]

The Vindicator addresses the Spectator’s “doing harm” piece

February 15, 2011 by

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From the Republican Vindicator, February 15, 1861, in response to the piece I mentioned, =>here: The Spectator The Spectator, seeking an excuse to compliment its editor in the last issue of that paper, says it “understood that some of the extremists in this and the adjoining counties say that the Staunton Spectator is doing more […]

“What Can Virginia Do?”

February 9, 2011 by

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From the secession-leaning Staunton Vindicator, February 8, 1861… 150 years ago yesterday… The return so far received from the election on Monday last, show that a majority of “Union” candidates have been chosen over their “Secession” opponents. The complete returns from the State will not be received in time for publication in our issue of […]

Newspapers that reveal something new to popular memory of the Civil War… perhaps…

February 6, 2011 by

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Once again (as can be seen in my post from Friday), I’ve been perusing the Valley of the Shadow site. My focus in that post on Friday was on the two papers in Staunton, Virginia, at this particular time (the first week of February), 150 years ago. One of those papers happened to support secession, […]

Virginia newspapers “doing harm” to sentiments of disunion

February 4, 2011 by

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As Ron Baumgarten pointed out in his post the other day over at “All Not So Quiet on the Potomac”, today marks the 150th anniversary of Virginians voting for delegates to the Virginia Convention of 1861. By the time of the vote, seven states from the deep South had seceded; Texas being the most recent, […]

The voice of the Southern people left unheard…

April 26, 2010 by

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Took a little “virtual walk” among some items in the Valley of the Shadow today and found quite a bit that was of interest, but wanted to throw these out for consideration… all from the Feb. 26, 1861 issue of the Staunton Spectator… The Natchez Courier “Contends that the people of Natchez were not in […]

A few words from the past

January 30, 2009 by

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Browsing through the Staunton Spectator today at the Valley of the Shadow site, I came across the following newspaper article (from October 15, 1867): A Few Words to the Colored People An election is at hand, and in the Providence of God, you are called on to take part in it. No one doubts your […]

On election day eve… Monday night, November 5, 1860

November 4, 2008 by

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As a follow-up to my two posts (Oct. 29 & 30) about Stephen Douglas’ visit to Staunton and Harrisonburg, Virginia, I was wondering… as Virginians stood on the eve of the election of 1860, what were their thoughts? Flipping through the “virtual stack” of digitized era newspapers, I find that we have access to copies of the Richmond Dispatch, Staunton’s […]

The last time a presidential candidate came to Harrisonburg, Virginia

October 29, 2008 by

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I was a bit envious of the jump that the A. Lincoln blog got on me in posting something about the historical significance of Barack Obama’s visit to Harrisonburg, Virginia. If you aren’t aware, the last time a presidential candidate came to Harrisonburg was in 1860, with a visit by Stephen Douglas! In regard to […]