Browsing All posts tagged under »Southern history«

Telling the story of the Civil War: The Joseph’s Coat* approach

August 10, 2012 by

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Over at Emerging Civil War, Kathleen Logothetis posted something today (Let’s Talk Openly About Slavery: Interpretation at Monticello) that caught my attention and made me think a little more about what might be considered a challenge in telling the story of the Civil War. Not that it’s difficult to weave together the topic of slavery with the Civil War… that’s […]

Southern by the grace of cornbread!

February 23, 2011 by

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Thinking about Craig’s post from the other day, I remembered something I’ve been meaning to post about cornbread… yes, cornbread. Now cornbread has become known as something distinctly “Southron”, but appears to  have origins with the Native People of what is now the southeastern U.S. (references vary, but among those suggested as originators are the […]

An against the grain Southerner… I suppose.

December 29, 2010 by

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Brooks Simpson’s recent post got me thinking… For some Southerners, maybe it’s just a little too easy to dismiss a Northerner when he/she writes about the history of the Civil War era South. For these same Southerners… when confronted with another Southerner who writes not so much in harmony with the Lost Cause ideology… what […]

One site, multiple angles for interpretation

December 19, 2010 by

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One of my favorite historic sites in Page County, Virginia is Catherine’s Furnace. Because of efforts made in the early 2000s, the site has one Virginia Civil War Trails marker. I was fortunate to be involved in deciding that the site merited a marker, and I also wrote the text and provided images for the […]