Browsing All posts tagged under »Shenandoah County Virginia«

More on literacy in antebellum Shenandoah – libraries, taxes and public schools

September 26, 2013 by

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Having spent more time tallying stats, it’s time to share a bit more regarding my thoughts on the antebellum literacy levels in the Shenandoah Valley… According to the 1850 census, at that time, the Shenandoah Valley had a total of four public libraries, with a total of 5,510 volumes. Those libraries could be found in only four out […]

The reach of religion in the Shenandoah Valley in 1860

September 15, 2013 by

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In part, my interest in looking into churches in the Shenandoah Valley is to see if there is any connection to the literacy rate. I’m also curious how the denominations reflect anything that may help me further in my understanding of Southern Unionism in the Valley. Though I don’t think I have anything that gives […]

Literacy rates in the antebellum Shenandoah Valley

September 12, 2013 by

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*UPDATE: Actually, though they weren’t part of the 1860 census, the numbers of those who could not read and/or write were tallied in the census for both 1840 and 1850. I will probably tally the numbers from that census to compare with the numbers shown in the 1870 census. I’m sorry to say, there are […]

Interpreting USCTs in places where they were not…

March 10, 2013 by

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Recently, there’s been a flurry of posts about USCTs (see Craig Swain’s, here; Emmanuel Dabney’s, here; Kevin Levin’s, here; and Jimmy Price’s, here), and, as I’m in the process of compiling a list of USCTs born in Shenandoah Valley counties, I find it timely. Should the interpretation of USCTs be incorporated into places in which they were not… […]

Thoughts on Lt. Gatewood’s (Geronimo fame) Confederate AND military roots

February 17, 2013 by

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He’s a warrior. Every bit born in battle. Fighting a lost cause. I’m familiar with the type. My two older brothers and my father fought for the Army of Northern Virginia. My oldest brother was killed. My father was wounded, crippled. After the war, he took me aside and said, ‘You’ll carry the new flag.’ […]

The widow of a refugee

November 17, 2012 by

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A few months back I ran across the claim of Rebecca Spigle. At first glance (a quick look at that), I saw that her husband died while a refugee. I get the thought that some opted to become refugees… and her husband, Samuel (not to be confused with Samuel Spiggle, of the 2nd Virginia Infantry… […]

A Shenandoah Valley man for Lincoln

July 12, 2012 by

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The phrase “Lincoln’s Loyalists” always bothers me. Theoretically, yes, Southern Unionists were Lincoln’s loyalists, but that’s not to say they were all necessarily dedicated to Lincoln. I can imagine, for example, that the slave-holding Unionists remained worried over which way the institution might go under his administration. Still, yes… some really were supporters of Lincoln. […]

“… he… was not going to vote for a slave government.”

July 11, 2012 by

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The argument can be common. The war was about slavery vs. the war was not about slavery. Usually, when those two points of view collide, the result is a string of reasons why… coming from both sides. More significant to me are the accounts of people who lived in that time… and even better if […]

Shenandoah Valley African-Americans in the Civil War… a sampling

October 30, 2011 by

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You might recall a post from this past July, in which I briefly mentioned Shenandoah Valley African-Americans in the USCT. I haven’t had as much time to work with that project as I would like, but it’s one that is always on my mind. Perhaps, over winter, I’ll be able to wrap it up. Anyway, […]