Browsing All posts tagged under »Robert E. Lee«

“I would much like a guide” – Shenandoah Sesqui, December 12, 1863

December 12, 2013 by

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By the morning of December 12, Col. Wells’ reported that his command had reached Winchester, on the night prior… I have the honor to report my command here last night. All well. Eighteen miles from here to Strasburg, making the whole distance 48 miles. Have not seen Colonel Boyd, but learn that he is ahead. […]

Fredericksburg150 – That “other guy” on the Confederate right: Capt. Mathias Winston Henry

December 13, 2012 by

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No, not about Southern Unionists or the Valley… but there’s a tie to the Valley… just wait for it a bit. In Don Troiani’s print, “Bronze Guns and Iron Men”, there is an officer other than John Pelham, just behind the Napoleon, with binoculars in hand. To most, it might appear like a section commander… […]

Revisiting a family ghost story, from the Civil War…

October 31, 2011 by

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This appeared in a post last year, but, I like the story so much… Despite being part of a series of victories in 1862, the “Page Grays” of Co. H, 33rd Virginia Infantry, had seen their fair share of desertions (not, by any means, that the “Grays” were slackers, as the company also saw more than […]

Virginia’s Person of the Year for 1861 would be… ???

February 26, 2011 by

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Yes, I know, there are lots of folks out there who would immediately proclaim Robert E. Lee as Virginia’s Man Person of the Year for 1861… without giving the question further thought. Yet, I think that identifies a problem. Personally, I think the question merits further thought. What, exactly, would make someone a “person of […]

Recent reenactments and the media

January 23, 2011 by

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We’ve seen a couple reenactments lately, and they haven’t been reenactments of battles. The slave auction reenactment, I think, was high impact. It continues to make an impression on YouTube, but honestly, there are a couple of videos available, and the best is one (=>see a post from a few days ago, in which I […]

Union veterans in postwar reconciliation… giving up ground won?

January 1, 2011 by

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Keith Harris has an interesting post up today, discussing how G.A.R. members saw Robert E. Lee in postwar remembrance. Between this and their reaction toward the return of Confederate battleflags, one would think that, though interested in participating in gestures of reconciliation, Union veterans were unwilling to give up ground gained so easily forget the […]

… and from Harper’s Ferry, Strother writes…

October 18, 2010 by

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Picking-up from where Strother left off yesterday… Early on the morning of the 18th I went up street and there met Joe Burns who informed me that our boys had had a fight and that seven or eight of them had been wounded, two supposed mortally, this was exciting and hurrying to the Depot I […]

Sunday afternoons with “The Porte”, Part VII

October 10, 2010 by

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What?! Did you think the entire month was going to be dedicated to ghosts, witches, and the generally eerie? On and off since May, I’ve been transcribing David Hunter Strother‘s “Personal Recollections of the Civil War. By a Virginian” as originally published in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, beginning in June 1866. Though I don’t transcribe […]

How far for “Cause” and “Country?”

April 9, 2009 by

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Quick post today, but as I am very aware that today is April 9… the anniversary of Appomattox, I just had a few thoughts driving to school today. At Appomattox, Lee had but a fraction of the men that once filled the ranks of the ANV. Sure, many had died along the way, suffered incapacitating […]

On Lincoln’s 200th Birthday

February 12, 2009 by

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In trying to figure out the best way to express my feelings in a post about the 200th birthday of Abraham Lincoln, I think I’ve stepped back a bit in my own memory. In my youth, Lincoln was, quite honestly, a significant factor in developing my interest in the American Civil War. I can still […]

Some thoughts on Lee-Jackson Day

January 17, 2009 by

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It is fine to both privately and, to a degree, publicly reflect upon the lives of historical persons. It fulfills various needs of the living. Look at a historical person (or persons) and consider the part of the historical person’s character, actions, etc., and consider how one may take meaning from these reflections. For some, […]

Were Southern children really subjected to “Yankee lies” in school texts?

December 22, 2008 by

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In a much earlier post, I promised to discuss something about the B.F. Johnson Publishing Company… so… In a letter written by one F.T. Amiss (we’ll see him again in another post) on April 13, 1914, Amiss remarked: …as an assistant Editor of the B.F. Johnson Publishing Co., of Richmond, Va., I helped to edit the first […]

Testimony of Wesley Norris… and an investigation of the Custis/Lee-Burke story

December 7, 2008 by

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I did not know this… My name is Wesley Norris; I was born a slave on the plantation of George Parke Custis; after the death of Mr. Custis, Gen. Lee, who had been made executor of the estate, assumed control of the slaves, in number about seventy; it was the general impression among the slaves […]

Civil War “forgetfulness?” Ummm, sure… so “where did the love go?”

December 1, 2008 by

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Noting a remark in a post made on Richard William’s blog that demonstrates Richard’s belief that saying “Civil War ‘forgetfulness’” is more appropriate than saying “Civil War ‘memory’” (I would argue that both “forgetfulness” and “memory” have valid places in understanding the way people reflect on the war, but that will come in another post), something came to mind. […]

Some thoughts on Civil War art

November 12, 2008 by

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Noting three different posts (here, here and here) in three different blogs about this print by Mort Kunstler, I thought I’d chime in with some thoughts of my own. Are the criticisms really attacks on Southern heritage (also known by some of having some absolute prerequisite of being Confederate heritage) or is it just that some folks […]

The Tipsy Historian on Stonewall Jackson

November 3, 2008 by

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Mark at The Tipsy Historian blog has an interesting post about Stonewall Jackson. In terms of how hero-worship can impact historical analysis, he makes some excellent points. He also leaves us with a good deal to think about. Think of this… Jackson, Grant, Lee, Longstreet, Chamberlain, Lincoln, etc., they each achieved great things in history, but […]

What is the South and who is really attacking it?

October 31, 2008 by

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When considering the study of Civil War memory, I read regularly, and with great interest, the stories about Southern culture being under attack. What’s even more interesting is when Southern culture is defined by certain people through Confederate symbology (e.g., the Confederate flag, monuments, heroes, etc.). Is it, therefore, to be assumed that Confederate symbology […]

If the shoe was on the other foot… Confederate troops in the North

July 18, 2008 by

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When I read about the “horrors of war” inflicted upon Southerners (most especially civilians) by Union troops, I wonder what stories would have come out of the war if the Confederate army spent more time on “Northern soil.” But then, why wonder when what little time they spent there was documented… with atrocities. Yes, I’m […]

The need to lay aside animosities for dead men

February 26, 2008 by

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While I clearly have grievances with the way some people like to distort history for modern agendas, I think that there should be a cut-off point between being aggravated with people today and bashing people of yesterday. To some degree, it reminds me of modern political campaigns where mudslinging runs rampant in an effort to […]