Browsing All posts tagged under »Luray«

Sesqui’fying April 19, 1862 – Hotchkiss’ challenge in the Page Valley

April 19, 2012 by

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The stage being set in yesterday’s post, which was supposed to be this morning’s post… this is where I get to inject a little light-hearted commentary, into the seriousness of the day… When Hotchkiss arrived at Shenandoah Iron Works, he found his cavalrymen… two companies of the 7th Virginia Cavalry… “in a state of drunkenness”.** Now, what’s […]

Luray’s witness tree

June 3, 2011 by

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Since we’re in mourning for the Jackson Prayer Oak (see here, and here… and yes, I’m a tree hugger of sorts… especially when it comes to witness trees), I figured it was a perfect time to talk about another witness tree, but further down the Valley, in Page County. While this tree didn’t witness any […]

The mustering of troops in Virginia… revisiting enlistments in the militia

May 18, 2011 by

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It’s the middle of May 1861… and Virginians are flocking to units across the state… In some areas of Virginia, the mustering of troops for Virginia units (ultimately assigned to the cause of the Confederacy) began as early as the day the news of secession hit the streets. No doubt, some were quite eager to […]

All is not as it may first appear… the poetess and her work

May 1, 2011 by

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Cornelia Jane Mathews Jordan is an excellent example of one of the many paths that sprung forth from basic Southern Unionism. While one piece of her work reflects a strong affection to the Union and the flag, her opinions were not concrete, and were greatly influenced by her affiliations and the situations that she encountered, during the course of the war. ...[ Read more...]

A quest to know more about my Virginia ancestor who spoke out against secession

April 3, 2011 by

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As I mentioned yesterday, after posting a few items focused on anti-secession rhetoric in Virginia (during this time of the year, 150 years ago) this past week, I began thinking again about an ancestor of mine who also spoke out against secession at this same time. John Shuler (1815-1908) was a well-to-do farmer in Grove […]

Submariner’s remembrance…

March 13, 2011 by

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I’m slightly distracted today… for a number of reasons… so, I’m going to deviate slightly from the standard content here… and yes, I’ll be getting back to the story I started yesterday. I pitched an idea to fellow submariners today (on FaceBook), thinking it would be interesting to learn not just about the boats lost, […]

Yes, Page County, you once had slaves…

January 16, 2011 by

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While the audience of this blog is typically from well beyond the boundaries of my home county (and, I’m happy to say, even beyond the confines of this continent), I frequently look back to that place, as I have spent a considerable number of years writing about its history. No doubt, it’s fascinating to me […]

Charles M. Brown… Page County’s “Black Confederate”… or… maybe not(?)

October 27, 2010 by

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As, I believe, most are aware (mostly because of the recent issue with the textbooks in Virginia), there is a great deal of talk about the subject of “Black Confederates” at this time, and, in the CW blogosphere, I think Andy Hall and Kevin Levin are handling it just fine. I’ve engaged in discussion about […]

Welcome readers of the Page News and Courier

October 27, 2010 by

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As the last article for my newspaper column (of over thirteen years) appears in the weekly edition of the Page News and Courier today, and an open invitation to join me at my blog was included in the article… I just wanted to say a quick “hi!” to those folks as they join us… here. […]

An appeal for assistance – the grave of Churchill Jones Crittenden

October 12, 2010 by

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Among other things, this month also marks 146 years since the execution of two Maryland Confederate troopers in my home county. A rare request from me, but I think a worthy effort… One of the headstones needing attention in Shockoe Hill Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia, is that of Churchill Jones Crittenden. Even though a replacement headstone […]

“water of many turns”

October 9, 2010 by

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Just the other day, I made reference to the Lenape/Delaware word “Conococheague“, which means “water of many turns.” Funny, but that pretty much summarizes the way I write this blog… not to mention the fluid nature of many blogs. The content can turn, twist, and completely shift, without warning. It’s more a reflection of what […]

Early burial customs from the Valley

October 7, 2010 by

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Just a little something I thought might be of interest… this being from a newspaper column from 1937, reflecting on the old burial customs. We, of the younger generation, accustomed as we are to the modern funerals, with everything being done that is possible to alleviate the anguish of the family and friends of the […]

Sending off “the boys” from Luray

August 20, 2010 by

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Wish this would have scanned a little more clear. Nonetheless, I was mistaken about the combination of Confederate flags and U.S. flags in this photo… albeit, there are Confederate veterans. In fact, first man in the front on the left (the older gentlemen) was a captain, and former commanding officer of Co. K, 10th Virginia […]

Genl. Grant…

April 27, 2010 by

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Here’s to Genl. Grant on his 188th birthday… As a Southerner with ancestors who fought with him and against him, I’m always intrigued by the man. I personally admire his absolute determination, and am quite fascinated when I find hints of him in the history of my home county (Page County) in Virginia. Just a […]

Was Appomattox really sad for ALL those who loved the South in 1865?

April 11, 2010 by

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Once again, while reading today’s post by Kevin, I’m compelled to write something longer than a comment to the post. Specifically, there was a comment at Richard Williams’ blog that was reflective of one contemporary person’s opinion of what April 9, 1865 meant to “all of us who love the South.” Well, to be frank, […]

Co. E of White’s Comanches in Luray (August 1894)

March 29, 2010 by

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It’s rare that I find something related to Page County in the Civil War in another blog, so when I do, I’m obviously interested. Right away, I recognized that the image of Harrison Monroe Strickler in Scott Mingus’ recent post originated in this reunion photo from 1894.  My gggg-granduncle, Howard Richards, also appears in it, […]

Civil War “forgetfulness?” Ummm, sure… so “where did the love go?”

December 1, 2008 by

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Noting a remark in a post made on Richard William’s blog that demonstrates Richard’s belief that saying “Civil War ‘forgetfulness'” is more appropriate than saying “Civil War ‘memory'” (I would argue that both “forgetfulness” and “memory” have valid places in understanding the way people reflect on the war, but that will come in another post), something came to mind. […]

In an effort to separate fact from fiction

November 15, 2008 by

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Just shifting gears a bit this evening and focusing on the complications of Civil War-era memory at the level of a small community. By no means is the following some earth-shattering historical finding, but I use it here to give an example of how we should take care in interpreting what we read… and what is […]

A Tale for Halloween

October 31, 2008 by

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Among the many stories that I gathered while conducting research for my thesis, there was one that caught my attention for more than one reason. I used a portion of the story for my thesis, as it was useful in documenting the activities of Confederate conscript hunters. The part that I did not use is […]

Historial analysis and the example of the Haynes-Beylor Murder

October 25, 2008 by

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I’ll say it again… the Haynes-Beylor story as I first posted it, if I were to have left it alone, could be considered “shock history.” As a stand-alone story, it left many questions that remained unanswered. It would be irresponsible for an historian to leave a story like this, posted without analysis. The investigative work […]

More on the Haynes-Beylor Murder

October 21, 2008 by

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I’m back! Now it’s time to reflect on my post of 3 October. When I posted the story, I was thinking two things. First, as a stand-alone story, how does this tale of the Haynes-Beylor murder compare to the way that some other folks like to tell history. I take, as an example, Cisco’s book, War Crimes Against Southern […]

The Haynes-Beylor Murder

October 3, 2008 by

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Picking up from where I left off with my last post… As I prepared to begin work on my thesis, I began sorting out my “findings” from the newspapers and Southern Unionist claims. Despite all that I already had, there was more to be learned. In fact, I exchanged e-mails with one person who made me aware […]

Reflections on Cold Mountain… and a little more

March 5, 2008 by

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While the movie Cold Mountain has been out for sometime, I found a very interesting link to “Cold Mountain Diary.” Between this page and a few others, Charles Frazier (author of Cold Mountain) and others provide some great details about how the story came to be. Incidentally, I found this link through that syllabus that […]