Browsing All posts tagged under »Loudoun Heights«

Cole vs. Mosby: The end to a “rivalry”(?)

February 21, 2014 by

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February 21, 1864 was a Sunday. A good day, it seems, for an ending. Mosby had ordered his command to assemble at Piedmont to attend the funeral of Ranger Joseph McCobb (a rather elusive person to find in records, by the way), who had been killed (by a fall from his horse) in the fight, the day […]

From Belle Isle to warmer climate

February 19, 2014 by

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After experiencing life at Belle Isle (even after just a few months), the thought of heading south, to a new POW camp in Georgia may have had its perks. Warmer weather and healthier conditions may have come to the minds of Union prisoners of war, though the thought of being farther from home may have […]

“Wait a minute. Strike that; reverse it. Thank you.”

January 13, 2014 by

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Considering the quote from Willy Wonka, I think he would have loved the versatility of blogging over writing for print. But, apart from me finding the quote useful at this time, that’s the only connection that there is between this post and Willy Wonka… So, what is it, exactly, that I want to “strike and […]

Some shots from yesterday’s Loudoun Heights Sesqui Event

January 12, 2014 by

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I greatly enjoyed the chance, yesterday, to be part of the Loudoun Heights 150th commemorative event. It was nice to speak about my perspective, as a relative of two of Cole’s men… and I was glad to share the experience with one other descendant (friend, Mark Dudrow) of one of Cole’s men (Abraham Dern), who […]

45 minutes, and the long road to Andersonville

January 10, 2014 by

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As they say that it was around 4 a.m. when Mosby commenced the attack on Cole’s Camp, it was, therefore, likely no more than 15 minutes before that when the six troopers of Co. B were captured by Frank Stringfellow’s party of Rangers. I’ll borrow, again, Pvt. James A. Scott’s (of Co. C) poem regarding […]

Waiting for picket duty… Loudoun Heights

January 9, 2014 by

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Today, I’m thinking about seven troopers from Co. B, of Major Henry Cole’s 1st Potomac Home Brigade (Maryland) Cavalry… James Draper Moore, Walter Scott Myers, John Newcomber, Isaiah Nicewander, Abraham L. Sossey, George W. Weaver, and David Hamilton Wolf. Six of these men were waiting to go on picket duty, on this day, 150 year […]

Visualizing a community, and “my people’s” place in it

October 29, 2009 by

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A couple weekends back, I had a chance to make a sweeping “history run,” starting at Loudoun Heights and ending up at Dam 5. All-in-all it was a full-bodied trip, and accomplished within seven hours. At Loudoun Heights, I finally had the chance to meet Craig Swain and his “assistant,” talked a bit, and took […]

Murder or warfare? The night attack at Loudoun Heights

September 16, 2009 by

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Thinking back to my post about Abraham Sosey’s headstone and a comment made about “murder” (a thought-provoking comment considering the nature of guerilla warfare in the Civil War), I thought I’d post a little something I read in C. Armour Newcomer’s book about Cole’s Cavalry (Newcomer was a member of Co. D of Cole’s Cavalry). In the […]

Considering animosity from the other side

September 5, 2009 by

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Not long ago, I was walking through the Lutheran cemetery (St. Peter’s Evangelical Lutheran Church Yard) in Clear Spring and came across this headstone for Abraham L. Sossy [*]… I’m surprised I have never seen it before, because I have been to the cemetery several times. Nonetheless, when taking a little more time to walk […]

Another form of Civil War “Memory”

December 31, 2008 by

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I thoroughly enjoy taking this… … and coming up with this… Name: Konoginsky, Gustave (or Gustav) Unit: 41st New York Infantry, Company A Circumstances of death: MWIA 6/8/62, Battle of Cross Keys Date of Death: 6/12/62 Age: 19 Pensions received (widow/mother, etc.) based on his service: None (though 80 out of his company received pensions). … […]

More puzzlements over Civil War “memory”

March 8, 2008 by

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I’ve written about how I am puzzled over the way that those with no familial connections whatsoever have found “sympathetic connections” with one side or another in the Civil War. I’ve also written about how a person, descended from a Union soldier, had been left with a legacy of forgotten family participation in the war. However, today, I […]