Browsing All posts tagged under »Confederate«

Southern Unionist? Liar, liar, pants on fire!

July 17, 2012 by

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In my exchanges, over the years, some folks have indicated that they thought some Southern Claims applicants were lying. Well, yes some were, but I have to ask… “How have you identified those who you think were lying?” It’s not always so easy. Sometimes, however, it’s painfully obvious… and one doesn’t have to read between […]

Reverse the Circumstances

April 24, 2011 by

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I’m not much into alternative history, because there may be an infinite number of forks in the road, but this is entertaining… and a take on things, from April 1861… (it appeared in the April 23, 1861 edition of the Staunton Spectator). Reverse the Circumstances. If there were any reason left amongst the people of […]

“They call me a traitor now”

April 23, 2011 by

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This poem (and, no, not written by the same author, whose poem I posted on April 21… and not to fret, I’ll be telling you more about the author of that poem, soon) comes from the Memphis Bulletin (as reprinted in the Staunton Spectator. You remember… the Unionist paper in that town…) April 23, 1861. […]

Maryland is “Southron”, ya’ll… and therefore, Confederate!(???)

April 3, 2011 by

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Oh, goodness… what do we have here? Obviously, the video has a number of issues, but I’m just going to stick to the “Southern = Confederate” issue rearing its ugly head, yet once again. There is no doubt that Maryland does indeed qualify as a Southern state… and therefore… her residents at the time of […]

It was All About Taxes…

March 21, 2011 by

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There is a TV spot discussing the causes of the Civil War recently introduced in some localities.   The Georgia Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans created the ad and it is one of twelve running.  Thus far the only place I’ve seen a web copy of the ad is on Facebook (here).  While those […]

… and as for Marylanders and 1861…

February 26, 2011 by

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Having asked for input regarding who should be Virginia’s person of the year for 1861, I felt that I also had to ask the same for Maryland. This time, however, Robert E. Lee is not an option, creating what is, I think, a more challenging question to answer. Who stands out as “Person of the […]

Southern by the grace of cornbread!

February 23, 2011 by

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Thinking about Craig’s post from the other day, I remembered something I’ve been meaning to post about cornbread… yes, cornbread. Now cornbread has become known as something distinctly “Southron”, but appears to  have origins with the Native People of what is now the southeastern U.S. (references vary, but among those suggested as originators are the […]

The heritage dilemma and the Civil War

February 8, 2011 by

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Just a quick thought, but… What is one’s personal Civil War heritage? I see it as that link to the past through ancestors. So, if heritage is a part of us… the blood of our ancestry running through us, I’m wondering… With each generation, there comes the possibility/probability that a new line of heritage is […]

Were Southern Unionists and Northern Copperheads really comparable?

January 29, 2011 by

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Over the last two years, when I’ve raised points about Southern Unionists, the topic of Northern Copperheads has entered the picture. I think the two groups are commonly seen in the most basic terms… people in two separate geographic regions that supported the government (or “cause”) in power in the other geographic region. But, I […]

Recent reenactments and the media

January 23, 2011 by

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We’ve seen a couple reenactments lately, and they haven’t been reenactments of battles. The slave auction reenactment, I think, was high impact. It continues to make an impression on YouTube, but honestly, there are a couple of videos available, and the best is one (=>see a post from a few days ago, in which I […]

Maryland, my Maryland, wherefore art thou, my Maryland?

January 9, 2011 by

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Earlier this week, I posted a quick comment on my Facebook page about Maryland’s War of 1812 license plates. It’s everywhere, it’s everywhere! Yet, Maryland’s silence about the Sesquicentennial is excruciatingly painful. No blogs, no tweets, nothing… I’m not saying that the War of 1812 is unimportant… because it IS important. What bothers me is […]

Proud to be a Southerner!

January 2, 2011 by

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Sure, I love the South, for ALL of its history and heritage… it’s my history… it’s my heritage. But, to be proud of Southern heritage in connection with the war years between 1861-1865, what does that mean, exactly? Let’s keep it simple today… It means an ability to remain conscious of the fact that to […]

One site, multiple angles for interpretation

December 19, 2010 by

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One of my favorite historic sites in Page County, Virginia is Catherine’s Furnace. Because of efforts made in the early 2000s, the site has one Virginia Civil War Trails marker. I was fortunate to be involved in deciding that the site merited a marker, and I also wrote the text and provided images for the […]

On the notion that emancipation would eventually come in a free and independent Southern Confederacy

December 12, 2010 by

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With the title of this post in mind… this editorial comes from the Staunton Vindicator, December 14, 1860 (courtesy the Valley of the Shadow site). Now, I realize, as an editorial, it is, or may be, just one man’s opinion, but, there appear to be reflections of the attitudes of others. I’ve placed emphasis in […]

Complex connections

November 22, 2010 by

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I saw this today, and the first thing I thought was, “oh, I bet Harry would be interested in this”… The thing is, I was looking for the headstones of David Hunter Strother’s (aka Porte Crayon… or, around these parts, simply, “The Porte“) parents. Well, this stone was not ten feet from John Strother’s stone… […]

An execution… a ghost’s last hymn… and a curse fulfilled(?)

October 31, 2010 by

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As I’ve mentioned several times in my postings throughout the month, October brings to mind stories of witches and ghosts, but one ghost story captures my thinking frequently throughout the month. I suppose, one can almost say that it literally “haunts” me. The story actually developed over time, with each piece of information I uncovered […]

Sunday afternoons with “The Porte”, Part VIII

October 17, 2010 by

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Continuing from Strother’s last… On Monday, 22d of April, the excitement still continued, the mobs occasionally breaking into shops in search of arms. The battle of Cockeysville did not take place as was expected. The Pennsylvanians, who were for the most part unarmed and altogether unprepared for a warlike encounter, had received warning of the […]

“water of many turns”

October 9, 2010 by

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Just the other day, I made reference to the Lenape/Delaware word “Conococheague“, which means “water of many turns.” Funny, but that pretty much summarizes the way I write this blog… not to mention the fluid nature of many blogs. The content can turn, twist, and completely shift, without warning. It’s more a reflection of what […]

Geotag test 2- Confederate section, Thornrose Cemetery

October 2, 2010 by

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Just a test of the Geotag feature, but, while I’m here… this section of land was used for burying both Union and Confederate dead who usually died while in the Confederate hospital that I just mentioned in the last post. The Union dead were later removed to the National Cemetery just to the east, and […]

… and they were all Southern, alike.

September 21, 2010 by

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I’ve said it before… the South does not equal the Confederacy. In fact, Southerness in general is not a reflection of the Confederacy. Southerness existed before the Confederacy… Southerness was and is the culture. Modern Confederateness, on the other hand, is a culture unto itself and is not to be confused as dominant over Southerness, […]

Personal recollections of the Civil War. By a Virginian. (D.H. Strother) [Installment 5]

September 4, 2010 by

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Returning to where I left off (my August 1, 2010/fourth installment of D.H. Strother’s “Recollections”)… The troops were now marching up the southern slope of the hill, since called Bolivar Heights, the crest of which was covered with pine woods and dense thickets of undergrowth, and furnished a favorable position from which to resist their […]

Registering for the draft… June, 1917

August 25, 2010 by

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From the Page News and Courier (Luray, Va.), June 1, 1917: No Lunacy in Page County The people of Page County are a law abiding people, and are remarkable for their thrift and common sense. For these reasons we believe the young man of Page county prefer registering to being registered. They will register because […]

The formation of the 29th Division – the Blue-Gray Division

August 23, 2010 by

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From p. 16 of History of the Twenty-Ninth Division, “Blue and Gray”, 1917-1919: It was soon realized that a divisional spirit or espirit must be encouraged, since the old organizations had been broken up. Remembering that the organizations in the War between the States which had special names or distinctive designations acquitted themselves unusually well, […]

Rockingham County, Virginia’s John Francis Lewis: his position on secession, the Confederacy, and postwar Virginia

April 23, 2010 by

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Following-up on my passing mention of Rockingham County, Virginia’s delegates to the Virginia Secession Convention in this post the other day, I thought it might be of interest to readers to know a little more about one of those delegates. As the obituary from the New York Times indicates, John Francis Lewis was openly opposed […]