Browsing All posts tagged under »Confederacy«

Grain, whiskey and a question of sovereignty – Shenandoah, January 1864

January 25, 2014 by

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Note: Conscious of the typical in-and-out Web surfer, I figured I better give a heads-up that there’s a long line of quotes that follow below, extracted from the Staunton Spectator… and as regular readers know, this isn’t typically my style. I was just fascinated by the series of whiskey articles that appeared in the paper, […]

Southern Unionist? Liar, liar, pants on fire!

July 17, 2012 by

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In my exchanges, over the years, some folks have indicated that they thought some Southern Claims applicants were lying. Well, yes some were, but I have to ask… “How have you identified those who you think were lying?” It’s not always so easy. Sometimes, however, it’s painfully obvious… and one doesn’t have to read between […]

Why I love adding Southern Unionist content to the Web

February 1, 2012 by

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… well, part of the reason… I read the occasional comments, here and there, on the Web (especially in so-called “Southern Heritage” forums), from people today who… and I paraphrase… “don’t understand how they (Southerners, today) could turn against their own heritage… denying the story of their Southern ancestors who ‘fought nobly for the South'”. […]

On Southerners and secession (1860-61)… motivations…

January 11, 2012 by

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Please pardon my rather lengthy absences over the past few months. Between dealing with some health issues, having surgery… and somewhere in between… still working an average 90+ hours per two weeks… not to mention the average 12-15 hours of commuting per week… writing has fallen significantly on my list of priorities (sleep has ranked […]

The mustering of troops in Virginia… revisiting enlistments in the militia

May 18, 2011 by

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It’s the middle of May 1861… and Virginians are flocking to units across the state… In some areas of Virginia, the mustering of troops for Virginia units (ultimately assigned to the cause of the Confederacy) began as early as the day the news of secession hit the streets. No doubt, some were quite eager to […]

“They call me a traitor now”

April 23, 2011 by

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This poem (and, no, not written by the same author, whose poem I posted on April 21… and not to fret, I’ll be telling you more about the author of that poem, soon) comes from the Memphis Bulletin (as reprinted in the Staunton Spectator. You remember… the Unionist paper in that town…) April 23, 1861. […]

That hideous Yankee tariff!

March 31, 2011 by

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… and yet… A Southern gentleman who resides in Augusta, Ga., writes thus:–“If the South were merely let alone for six months, we would probably try at the next general election to get back. The new tariff will open both eyes and pockets; 3 to 4 cents per pound on cheese, 4 to 5 cents […]

A reason why Virginians might fear an alignment with the “Northern Confederacy”

March 29, 2011 by

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From the Staunton Vindicator, March 29, 1861: Mr. Bennett, one of the financial officers of the State [Virginia], has already called for an increase of 20 cents in the one hundred dollars on the present rate of taxation. If the policy of the submissionists is adopted, and Virginia becomes a part of the Northern Confederacy, her […]

Were Virginia’s Confederate Reserves a smokescreen of deception?

March 23, 2011 by

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I’m really jumping the gun here, because I should be holding this story in reserve (sure, why not… pun intended) until 2014… marking the 150th anniversary of the establishment of Virginia’s Confederate reserve units. Still, I brought it up the other day (in “WYSIWYG Confederates?”) , so I figured that I would pick-up from where […]

It was All About Taxes…

March 21, 2011 by

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There is a TV spot discussing the causes of the Civil War recently introduced in some localities.   The Georgia Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans created the ad and it is one of twelve running.  Thus far the only place I’ve seen a web copy of the ad is on Facebook (here).  While those […]

Southern by the grace of cornbread!

February 23, 2011 by

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Thinking about Craig’s post from the other day, I remembered something I’ve been meaning to post about cornbread… yes, cornbread. Now cornbread has become known as something distinctly “Southron”, but appears to  have origins with the Native People of what is now the southeastern U.S. (references vary, but among those suggested as originators are the […]

“What Can Virginia Do?”

February 9, 2011 by

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From the secession-leaning Staunton Vindicator, February 8, 1861… 150 years ago yesterday… The return so far received from the election on Monday last, show that a majority of “Union” candidates have been chosen over their “Secession” opponents. The complete returns from the State will not be received in time for publication in our issue of […]

Were Southern Unionists and Northern Copperheads really comparable?

January 29, 2011 by

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Over the last two years, when I’ve raised points about Southern Unionists, the topic of Northern Copperheads has entered the picture. I think the two groups are commonly seen in the most basic terms… people in two separate geographic regions that supported the government (or “cause”) in power in the other geographic region. But, I […]

Recent reenactments and the media

January 23, 2011 by

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We’ve seen a couple reenactments lately, and they haven’t been reenactments of battles. The slave auction reenactment, I think, was high impact. It continues to make an impression on YouTube, but honestly, there are a couple of videos available, and the best is one (=>see a post from a few days ago, in which I […]

“All we ask is to be left alone”

January 15, 2011 by

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I’m picking-up from where I left off in my last post… Regarding some of those who opposed secession, and continued to do so… it didn’t necessarily mean that they were ready to go to war against their neighbors and friends, in defense of their position. Instead, many preferred to be left alone. They simply didn’t […]

Proud to be a Southerner!

January 2, 2011 by

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Sure, I love the South, for ALL of its history and heritage… it’s my history… it’s my heritage. But, to be proud of Southern heritage in connection with the war years between 1861-1865, what does that mean, exactly? Let’s keep it simple today… It means an ability to remain conscious of the fact that to […]

One site, multiple angles for interpretation

December 19, 2010 by

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One of my favorite historic sites in Page County, Virginia is Catherine’s Furnace. Because of efforts made in the early 2000s, the site has one Virginia Civil War Trails marker. I was fortunate to be involved in deciding that the site merited a marker, and I also wrote the text and provided images for the […]

On the notion that emancipation would eventually come in a free and independent Southern Confederacy

December 12, 2010 by

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With the title of this post in mind… this editorial comes from the Staunton Vindicator, December 14, 1860 (courtesy the Valley of the Shadow site). Now, I realize, as an editorial, it is, or may be, just one man’s opinion, but, there appear to be reflections of the attitudes of others. I’ve placed emphasis in […]

Goodhart on “States’ Rights”

December 5, 2010 by

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Some readers might already be familiar with the story of the Loudoun Rangers… but, just in case… in short, they were Virginia’s only organized Union unit (though many a Virginian joined Union units from other states). Briscoe Goodhart was a member of Company A. In his History of the Independent Loudoun Virginia Rangers, Goodhart wrote […]

Thinking of Southern Unionists under different terms

November 28, 2010 by

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I had been thinking about this for a while, but yesterday, while watching the latest Harry Potter movie, I caught myself thinking of Southern Unionists in a different light (yes, I know… of all things, how would I think about Southern Unionists in a Harry Potter movie… I suppose I’m hopeless…). Why did I think […]

Virginia’s textbook ordeal: thinking beyond “Black Confederates”

November 17, 2010 by

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Not long after the controversy over Virginia’s 4th grade history text began, like a number of others, I gave some thoughts about the mention of “Black Confederates” as well, but didn’t go beyond the single post. Yet, in the weeks that followed, I began to think more of what this means. Let’s focus specifically on […]

… and they were all Southern, alike.

September 21, 2010 by

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I’ve said it before… the South does not equal the Confederacy. In fact, Southerness in general is not a reflection of the Confederacy. Southerness existed before the Confederacy… Southerness was and is the culture. Modern Confederateness, on the other hand, is a culture unto itself and is not to be confused as dominant over Southerness, […]

Confabulation

September 17, 2010 by

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* Time for a guest post by Craig Swain. I’ve been looking forward to this one since Craig tossed the idea at me. He offers some good points about problems with historical memory, and especially Lost Cause as remembered today by folks who don’t have “memory” of then. As I’ve mentioned a few times… too […]

The Southern Citizen Rescue Expedition of 1861-1865

June 2, 2010 by

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I enjoy looking at history from different angles, and I’ve actually been thinking about the Southern Unionists thing in a different way. Interestingly, in a ListServ discussion today (I know, Kevin, I still haven’t learned my lesson), it came to mind once again. It might seem trivial to some, but I don’t necessarily believe it […]