Browsing All posts tagged under »Cole’s Cavalry«

Cole vs. Mosby: The end to a “rivalry”(?)

February 21, 2014 by

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February 21, 1864 was a Sunday. A good day, it seems, for an ending. Mosby had ordered his command to assemble at Piedmont to attend the funeral of Ranger Joseph McCobb (a rather elusive person to find in records, by the way), who had been killed (by a fall from his horse) in the fight, the day […]

From Belle Isle to warmer climate

February 19, 2014 by

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After experiencing life at Belle Isle (even after just a few months), the thought of heading south, to a new POW camp in Georgia may have had its perks. Warmer weather and healthier conditions may have come to the minds of Union prisoners of war, though the thought of being farther from home may have […]

Loudoun Heights, saved! Well… almost…

January 10, 2014 by

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Three posts by me in one day may not be unprecedented, but it sure is rare… and with news like this, I couldn’t resist. Word came to me earlier today, via blogging pal Craig Swain, that a portion of the Loudoun Heights battle site is now a state park. Friday morning, McDonnell’s office announced that […]

45 minutes, and the long road to Andersonville

January 10, 2014 by

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As they say that it was around 4 a.m. when Mosby commenced the attack on Cole’s Camp, it was, therefore, likely no more than 15 minutes before that when the six troopers of Co. B were captured by Frank Stringfellow’s party of Rangers. I’ll borrow, again, Pvt. James A. Scott’s (of Co. C) poem regarding […]

Was New Year’s Day, ’64 a bad day for Uncle Joe?

January 1, 2014 by

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I’ve mentioned my 3rd great granduncle, Joseph Lake McKinney, in a few posts. In his service record, there is one entry that is a bit of a mystery to me… mostly because it’s not clear what the circumstances were behind a notation. I know a lot of folks like to talk more about an ancestor’s […]

“I would much like a guide” – Shenandoah Sesqui, December 12, 1863

December 12, 2013 by

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By the morning of December 12, Col. Wells’ reported that his command had reached Winchester, on the night prior… I have the honor to report my command here last night. All well. Eighteen miles from here to Strasburg, making the whole distance 48 miles. Have not seen Colonel Boyd, but learn that he is ahead. […]

A daring, Federal scouting party rides into Confederate-held Berryville

November 24, 2013 by

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As I promised, yesterday, there is this one Sesqui moment tied to another that came and went last month without observation. While many of the men in Col. Simpson’s 9th Maryland Infantry were captured at Charles Town, on October 18, 1863, others took extreme risks to make sure Simpson, as well as the Harpers Ferry […]

With Lieutenant Rivers “on point”

September 25, 2013 by

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Craig has a post up today that caught my eye… quickly. Just the mention of Mosby and Rector’s Crossroads brought to mind… Cole’s Cavalry… a favorite unit of mine. Anyway, he writes about the September 1863 scrap, between Mosby’s men and Cole’s Cavalry, at Rector’s Crossroads. The officer “on point” that day, for Cole’s Cavalry, […]

Who was this Capt. Summers who fell at White House Farm?

July 9, 2013 by

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I first encountered a reference to Capt. Summers (see yesterday’s post in which I mention his death) when I was looking into the names of the different G.A.R. posts in this general area. It so happens that George D. Summers Post No. 13 was out of Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. There is, by the way, […]

150 years ago, today and yesterday… another personal Sesqui moment

September 3, 2011 by

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James Draper Moore (distant half first cousin) enlisted in Co. B (Capt. William Firey’s Company), Cole’s Volunteer Maryland Cavalry (Potomac Home Brigade), September 3, 1861. James was born and raised in Clear Spring, Maryland, and was living with his parents at the time of enlistment. Joseph Lake McKinney (third great grand-uncle) had enlisted in the […]

The despot’s heel, or a good swift kick from the tip of the boot?

July 17, 2011 by

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I haven’t given much attention to Maryland lately, and having read the following (below) passage the other day from Marylander C. Armour Newcomer’s book (p. 10), Cole’s Cavalry; or Three Years in the Saddle in the Shenandoah Valley (1895), I thought back to my earlier post about the misconception that Maryland was Southern, and therefore, […]

Maryland is “Southron”, ya’ll… and therefore, Confederate!(???)

April 3, 2011 by

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Oh, goodness… what do we have here? Obviously, the video has a number of issues, but I’m just going to stick to the “Southern = Confederate” issue rearing its ugly head, yet once again. There is no doubt that Maryland does indeed qualify as a Southern state… and therefore… her residents at the time of […]

Maryland, my Maryland, wherefore art thou, my Maryland?

January 9, 2011 by

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Earlier this week, I posted a quick comment on my Facebook page about Maryland’s War of 1812 license plates. It’s everywhere, it’s everywhere! Yet, Maryland’s silence about the Sesquicentennial is excruciatingly painful. No blogs, no tweets, nothing… I’m not saying that the War of 1812 is unimportant… because it IS important. What bothers me is […]

Finding Lieutenant Metz…

January 5, 2011 by

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Some folks might not have an appreciation for it, but… while researching, writing, and battlefield walking is a lot of fun, grave-hunting can also be a rewarding way to enjoy the history of the Civil War. Sure, you hear about people going to major cemeteries like Hollywood, Arlington, etc., etc., but how many are willing […]

The Border State Representatives Respond to Lincoln’s Appeal

January 4, 2010 by

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The following is a response to the appeal made by Lincoln (in this blog post from December) prior to the Emancipation Proclamation. It appeared on the same page, immediately following the President’s appeal, in the July 30, 1862 edition of the Hagerstown Herald of Freedom of Torch Light. Reply of the Majority. The following paper […]

Were “Black Republican Proclivities” at play in Clear Spring?

October 14, 2009 by

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Before I start with the article, I thought that I should point out… the Hagerstown Mail was a pro-secession publication, unlike Hagerstown’s Herald of Freedom and Torch Light. Apparently, the Mail, seeing all the talk (examples here and here) of strong Unionism in Clear Spring, thought that the town’s strong leanings toward Union might be influenced by […]

Understanding Unionism in the Maryland “borderland”

September 30, 2009 by

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Some are aware of my latest efforts in developing a unit history for Cole’s Cavalry, so I thought I’d occasionally share samplings of some findings. One of the things that strikes me about some of the Marylanders in the unit is the way that they considered themselves Southerners… and most really were since the majority of men […]

Murder or warfare? The night attack at Loudoun Heights

September 16, 2009 by

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Thinking back to my post about Abraham Sosey’s headstone and a comment made about “murder” (a thought-provoking comment considering the nature of guerilla warfare in the Civil War), I thought I’d post a little something I read in C. Armour Newcomer’s book about Cole’s Cavalry (Newcomer was a member of Co. D of Cole’s Cavalry). In the […]

Considering animosity from the other side

September 5, 2009 by

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Not long ago, I was walking through the Lutheran cemetery (St. Peter’s Evangelical Lutheran Church Yard) in Clear Spring and came across this headstone for Abraham L. Sossy [*]… I’m surprised I have never seen it before, because I have been to the cemetery several times. Nonetheless, when taking a little more time to walk […]

How far for “Cause” and “Country?”… Part 2

April 10, 2009 by

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O.k., I think I presented a thought-provoking post yesterday (actually today, as I am writing this second part within minutes of the first), but I’d like to stretch this out a little more. Consider the flip-side of this coin… One of my Union (Maryland) ancestors (actually, he was my third great grand uncle) enlisted in […]

Marker of the week in HMDB

March 1, 2009 by

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As I mentioned last week, I’ve been contributing some marker data to the Historic Markers Database. It’s a lot of fun, especially for someone who likes to set up tour guides and virtual tours among existing markers and locations where there should be markers. In the instance of recording the “Four Locks” marker on the C&O […]

Another form of Civil War “Memory”

December 31, 2008 by

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I thoroughly enjoy taking this… … and coming up with this… Name: Konoginsky, Gustave (or Gustav) Unit: 41st New York Infantry, Company A Circumstances of death: MWIA 6/8/62, Battle of Cross Keys Date of Death: 6/12/62 Age: 19 Pensions received (widow/mother, etc.) based on his service: None (though 80 out of his company received pensions). … […]

The new header for Cenantua’s Blog

November 9, 2008 by

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It’s been up for over a week, but if you still don’t recognize the image in the new header, it is a photo of the Maryland State Monument at Gettysburg. Most of my direct relatives in the Civil War were Virginians, but I also have family ties to Maryland. Those from western Maryland were Union […]

“Southern perspective” — one example of many

September 6, 2008 by

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“Although connected by ties of birth and blood with the South, I loved my country and flag better than my State or section.” — p. 10, Cole’s Cavalry; or Three Years in the Saddle in the Shenandoah Valley, by C. Armour Newcomer Though the book was written nearly forty years after Appomattox, it is one version of “Southern […]