Browsing All posts tagged under »Clarke County Virginia«

Dissecting a battlefield: on the Sesquicentenial of the Battle of Cool Spring

July 19, 2014 by

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I attended the first half of the Sesqui commemorative tour at Cool Spring yesterday… and a well-attended event it was (see Craig’s post about it, here). While I enjoyed hearing about the battle that unfolded along the Shenandoah River, I have to say… the infatuation I have with the cultural (pre-war and wartime) settings of […]

Confederate deserters… gone bad: Shenandoah, January, 1864.

January 30, 2014 by

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A little something to consider, regarding how some Confederates had turned lawless, even by this time, 150 years ago, in the Shenandoah Valley. From the Daily Dispatch (Richmond), January 25, 1864: Along the Shenandoah river, in Jefferson and Clarke counties, a regular band of robbers has been organized, composed of deserters from our army. This […]

When do we fail our history? – a perspective on an event, from Long Branch

December 31, 2013 by

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This isn’t the way I planned on introducing my thoughts on Long Branch. I think the place is amazing, and under the new director, Nicholas Redding, has shown growth and incredible potential as a historic site… perhaps even reaching the status as the premier historic site of Clarke County, Virginia. As I’m only about fifteen […]

To keep Confederates busy – the beginning of an active December in the Shenandoah

December 10, 2013 by

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“Stonewall” was gone and Gettysburg was over five months in the past… and, despite being overshadowed by other things in other places, the Shenandoah Valley was still an active arena. While Union Gen. William W. Averell pressed on the rail head of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, at Salem, his commanding officer, Brig. Gen. Benjamin […]

A daring, Federal scouting party rides into Confederate-held Berryville

November 24, 2013 by

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As I promised, yesterday, there is this one Sesqui moment tied to another that came and went last month without observation. While many of the men in Col. Simpson’s 9th Maryland Infantry were captured at Charles Town, on October 18, 1863, others took extreme risks to make sure Simpson, as well as the Harpers Ferry […]

More on literacy in antebellum Shenandoah – libraries, taxes and public schools

September 26, 2013 by

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Having spent more time tallying stats, it’s time to share a bit more regarding my thoughts on the antebellum literacy levels in the Shenandoah Valley… According to the 1850 census, at that time, the Shenandoah Valley had a total of four public libraries, with a total of 5,510 volumes. Those libraries could be found in only four out […]

The reach of religion in the Shenandoah Valley in 1860

September 15, 2013 by

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In part, my interest in looking into churches in the Shenandoah Valley is to see if there is any connection to the literacy rate. I’m also curious how the denominations reflect anything that may help me further in my understanding of Southern Unionism in the Valley. Though I don’t think I have anything that gives […]

Literacy rates in the antebellum Shenandoah Valley

September 12, 2013 by

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*UPDATE: Actually, though they weren’t part of the 1860 census, the numbers of those who could not read and/or write were tallied in the census for both 1840 and 1850. I will probably tally the numbers from that census to compare with the numbers shown in the 1870 census. I’m sorry to say, there are […]

146 years ago, this month

August 15, 2013 by

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Yes, that would make it… 1867. Not quite a Sesqui event, at least not yet. Sometimes it just feels right to get back to some more simple curiosities of history, as they impacted the Shenandoah Valley… So, scrolling through the newspapers in the area (lower Shenandoah) for the latter part of August, 1867, I ran […]

Fredericksburg150 – That “other guy” on the Confederate right: Capt. Mathias Winston Henry

December 13, 2012 by

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No, not about Southern Unionists or the Valley… but there’s a tie to the Valley… just wait for it a bit. In Don Troiani’s print, “Bronze Guns and Iron Men”, there is an officer other than John Pelham, just behind the Napoleon, with binoculars in hand. To most, it might appear like a section commander… […]

The Burwells of “Glenvin” (not “Carter Hall”), and one of the real “Undefeated”

October 30, 2012 by

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Writing when the mood strikes… I should write a post specifically focused on that… but… not today. Still, there are indeed certain “triggers” that prompt me to write about certain things on certain days… and today, it just so happens to be a situation in which the Sesqui (though I’m a little off by over […]

Shenandoah Valley African-Americans in the Civil War… a sampling

October 30, 2011 by

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You might recall a post from this past July, in which I briefly mentioned Shenandoah Valley African-Americans in the USCT. I haven’t had as much time to work with that project as I would like, but it’s one that is always on my mind. Perhaps, over winter, I’ll be able to wrap it up. Anyway, […]

Found!(?) Union soldiers hung by Mosby’s command

August 28, 2011 by

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Not as if I was really looking for them, but it appears the find has fallen in my lap… at least, I think it can be considered a find. Spending time, like I do, in the Winchester and Staunton National cemeteries, as well as with pertinent documents and publications (the Roll of Honor stands as […]

Sesquicentennial in the Shenandoah Valley… what you probably won’t hear about

July 2, 2011 by

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It’s something that’s been totally overshadowed by “memory” of Stonewall Jackson, Turner Ashby, the Stonewall Brigade, and even Sheridan’s “Burning”… and something that will likely remain overshadowed during the Sesquicentennial here, in the Shenandoah Valley. It’s the story of the Valley’s free black and slave population… the Unionists civilians (slave and free), and those who […]