Browsing All posts tagged under »Baltimore«

The despot’s heel, or a good swift kick from the tip of the boot?

July 17, 2011 by

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I haven’t given much attention to Maryland lately, and having read the following (below) passage the other day from Marylander C. Armour Newcomer’s book (p. 10), Cole’s Cavalry; or Three Years in the Saddle in the Shenandoah Valley (1895), I thought back to my earlier post about the misconception that Maryland was Southern, and therefore, […]

Strother returns to the Valley, April 30 – May 2, 1861

April 30, 2011 by

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As D.H. Strother makes his way from Annapolis, back to Harper's Ferry, he finds "the plot has thickened" considerably. Remarking briefly about the batteries placed on the surrounding hills, and the new commander there (T.J. Jackson), his attention is focused on discussions with some of the Virginia troops there. Despite being in the ranks, not all are embracing secession, and, in fact, remain hopeful that Virginians would reject it in the referendum to come, later in May. ...[ Read more...]

D.H. Strother, April 27, 1861

April 27, 2011 by

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On the 27th of April I met a friend who was on his way to Annapolis for the purpose of visiting his son, then a cadet in the Naval Academy. I was easily persuaded to accompany him, and at an early hour we took the steamer for that place. As we passed Fort McHenry the […]

Reverse the Circumstances

April 24, 2011 by

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I’m not much into alternative history, because there may be an infinite number of forks in the road, but this is entertaining… and a take on things, from April 1861… (it appeared in the April 23, 1861 edition of the Staunton Spectator). Reverse the Circumstances. If there were any reason left amongst the people of […]

Strother in Baltimore, April 21, 1861

April 21, 2011 by

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On Sunday, April 21, in pursuance of important private business, I went from Charlestown to Harper’s Ferry, and thence by the train to Baltimore. As Maryland was at that time supposed to be one of the elect, and Baltimore, by the acts of the 19th, had earned the right to be regarded as a true […]

Looking back at the Pratt Street (Baltimore) Riot

April 20, 2011 by

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Since I’m a little past due on the Maryland part of my Southron heritage… 150 years ago, yesterday… And then, this video from the Catholic Review: O.k., interesting, but once again, “Southern” continues to be entangled in the whole “they were all secessionists” stereotype. So, who’s with me? All those in favor of clarification… say […]

Modern realities vs. Sesquicentennial remembrance

April 6, 2011 by

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No need to lecture me. I get it. In the big scheme of things, the Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War is hardly on the radar when we consider some bigger issues facing us in these times. Yet, for those like myself, who have been looking forward to this time in our lifetime, for years, […]

“Will Secession Preserve Slavery?”

March 27, 2011 by

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I’m in a western Maryland frame of mind. So… …the following comes from the Herald and Torch (Hagerstown, Md.), March 13, 1861: Will Secession Preserve Slavery? The Baltimore Sun, which is the exponent of the extreme sentiments of the Southern rights men of Maryland, as they call themselves, says that “secession and union with the […]

Sunday afternoons with “The Porte”, Part VIII

October 17, 2010 by

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Continuing from Strother’s last… On Monday, 22d of April, the excitement still continued, the mobs occasionally breaking into shops in search of arms. The battle of Cockeysville did not take place as was expected. The Pennsylvanians, who were for the most part unarmed and altogether unprepared for a warlike encounter, had received warning of the […]

Sunday afternoons with “The Porte”, Part VII

October 10, 2010 by

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What?! Did you think the entire month was going to be dedicated to ghosts, witches, and the generally eerie? On and off since May, I’ve been transcribing David Hunter Strother‘s “Personal Recollections of the Civil War. By a Virginian” as originally published in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, beginning in June 1866. Though I don’t transcribe […]