Browsing All posts tagged under »abolition«

A seemingly odd two to be paired…

April 20, 2011 by

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After all, two very different causes… but, still… both acted in what amounts to be conspiracy with the intent to commit treason… against the Commonwealth of Virginia. I find it incredibly strange how some seem to forgive and forget (heck, many probably aren’t aware of Henry A. Wise and his actions, at all) when it […]

“Submission is Ruin.”

April 10, 2011 by

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I’ll let a pro-secession paper in Virginia speak for itself… Nothing could be more preposterous, nothing more stupid, than the dogma that slavery is a curse to the country. On the contrary, the heaviest calamity that could befall any slave State on this continent, the greatest curse that an angry Providence could inflict upon the […]

Tracing President Lincoln’s Thoughts on Slavery

March 29, 2011 by

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I meant to post this last month, but just now getting around to it. Eric Foner on Lincoln and slavery… to include abolition, emancipation, colonization, & etc. Very worthwhile stuff when considering some of the discussions within the blogosphere in the last few months. From NPR… http://www.npr.org/v2/?i=133372512&m=133783285&t=audio *Especially interesting when we consider those who try […]

“Imagined memory” and stereotypes as side-effects of Civil War-era art?

November 13, 2008 by

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In response to a comment yesterday, I wrote: … when you have art that is created, not out of interpretation of real events, but based on how an artist imagines an historical person may have reacted in an unreal or imagined scenario, then you have an “imagined presentation.” Is it, at that point really historical art, […]

Stephen Douglas’ Speech at Harrisonburg

October 30, 2008 by

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Realizing that those with dial-up may have a hard time opening the pdf that I mentioned yesterday, I decided to post a transcription of the review of Douglas’ speech as printed in Staunton’s Republican Vindicator on September 7, 1860. Of course, Douglas made the speech at the Court House in Harrisonburg, on Monday, September 3, 1860. […]