Browsing All posts tagged under »33rd Virginia Infantry«

Passing of the last real child of the Stonewall Brigade(?)

April 29, 2013 by

15

I’ve been seeing postings lately, mostly on Face Book, about the last four surviving children of Civil War veterans (actually, it focused on the last four just in Virginia alone… and I didn’t seem to catch that last part), and I added to each that I thought they were missing somebody. I’m sorry to say… […]

Thoughts on Lt. Gatewood’s (Geronimo fame) Confederate AND military roots

February 17, 2013 by

2

He’s a warrior. Every bit born in battle. Fighting a lost cause. I’m familiar with the type. My two older brothers and my father fought for the Army of Northern Virginia. My oldest brother was killed. My father was wounded, crippled. After the war, he took me aside and said, ‘You’ll carry the new flag.’ […]

Revisiting a family ghost story, from the Civil War…

October 31, 2011 by

0

This appeared in a post last year, but, I like the story so much… Despite being part of a series of victories in 1862, the “Page Grays” of Co. H, 33rd Virginia Infantry, had seen their fair share of desertions (not, by any means, that the “Grays” were slackers, as the company also saw more than […]

Their run to the guns…

July 22, 2011 by

15

Before I left Manassas yesterday, I had to do just one more thing. Yes, I was hot and miserable at the time, but, it didn’t matter, I had to do it. This is the first place that I’ve visited this year, on the 150th anniversary of an event in which my people were present, 150 […]

“I go in search of brother”

July 22, 2011 by

1

22nd. I go in search of brother Wm* who had been badly wounded; find him near the battlefield, and take him with other to the Junction. I then go in search of some other wounded, and find a few. Start to F. Royal at midnight with them. I am very wet from being in the […]

Reveille by picket fire, and a cannon…

July 21, 2011 by

1

This morning we were awakened by the firing of our pickets. After eating a hearty breakfast and filling our haversacks with provisions, we were again on the march. The artillery of the enemy could be distinctly heard on our right. After marching and counter marching for sometime, we were stationed within a-half mile of the […]

Casler, on the eve of battle…

July 20, 2011 by

1

The next day, the 20th of July, we marched about four miles down Bull Run, to where General Beauregard had engaged the enemy on the 18th, and repulsed their advance. There we joined the brigade. We lay on our arms all night. We tore all the feathers out of our hats, because we heard the […]

The mustering of troops in Virginia… revisiting enlistments in the militia

May 18, 2011 by

8

It’s the middle of May 1861… and Virginians are flocking to units across the state… In some areas of Virginia, the mustering of troops for Virginia units (ultimately assigned to the cause of the Confederacy) began as early as the day the news of secession hit the streets. No doubt, some were quite eager to […]

The Civil War… “through the eyes of my people”

December 31, 2010 by

17

Just jabbed my friend Harry a little by pointing out that some still refer to the Bull Run battles as the Battles of 1st and 2nd Manassas, respectively. It was all in good fun, and owe a hat tip to Harry for pointing out that there are some quality Civil War stamps on the horizon… […]

Was Appomattox really sad for ALL those who loved the South in 1865?

April 11, 2010 by

17

Once again, while reading today’s post by Kevin, I’m compelled to write something longer than a comment to the post. Specifically, there was a comment at Richard Williams’ blog that was reflective of one contemporary person’s opinion of what April 9, 1865 meant to “all of us who love the South.” Well, to be frank, […]

Confederate ancestor analysis #3 – Joseph Richards

September 2, 2009 by

1

Joseph Richards was born in 1833 (the third of seven children) to Aquilla and “Millie” Keyser Richards. Aquilla was of Welsh descent (the family having entered Pennsylvania in the late 1600s/early 1700s), while Millie was of German and English ancestry. In the 1850 census, after the death of his father, Aquilla (ca. 1804-ca. 1849), Joseph, […]

A Tale for Halloween

October 31, 2008 by

0

Among the many stories that I gathered while conducting research for my thesis, there was one that caught my attention for more than one reason. I used a portion of the story for my thesis, as it was useful in documenting the activities of Confederate conscript hunters. The part that I did not use is […]

“Recalling” Ford’s Theatre – a personal indulgence in Civil War “memory”

April 14, 2008 by

38

I didn’t learn about Edwin Arthur Emerson until about a year or so ago. I think the thing that most intrigued me was that, while I had been fascinated with the soldier family members who had served in the war, I did not realize that I had a family member present, on stage, on the […]

Anxious for secesh; not so anxious to fight

April 11, 2008 by

3

No, it wasn’t a standard feeling of those who voted for “secesh,” but I do think it’s worth mentioning (especially in the wake of the quick analysis of the referendum numbers) that some who were anxious for secession and likely voted for it in the referendum, weren’t so eager to defend the very “cause” that […]