Christian F. Laise’s ties to Berkeley County’s freedmen and Unionists

February 17, 2013
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Laise

A couple of years ago there was a good article in The Journal (Martinsburg, W.V.), in which postwar (1880s, actually) efforts by Christian Frederick Laise were part of the focus. Berkeley County has an African-American area listed in the National Register. After their freedom at the end of the Civil War, many former slaves had […]

Thoughts on Lt. Gatewood’s (Geronimo fame) Confederate AND military roots

February 17, 2013
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West Point image of Charles B. Gatewood, known by his classmates as "Scipio Africanus", for his resemblence to the Roman general/statesman. Geronimo knew him as "Nanton Bse-che", meaning "Big Nose Captain".

He’s a warrior. Every bit born in battle. Fighting a lost cause. I’m familiar with the type. My two older brothers and my father fought for the Army of Northern Virginia. My oldest brother was killed. My father was wounded, crippled. After the war, he took me aside and said, ‘You’ll carry the new flag.’ […]

Richard Williams and his forthcoming book, Lexington, Virginia and the Civil War

February 11, 2013
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Lexingtonbook

Earlier today, Richard Williams revealed my small part in his forthcoming book, Lexington, Virginia and the Civil War. It was indeed an honor for me, that Richard asked if I could contribute something pertaining to Southern Unionists in Lexington and Rockbridge County.   The contribution also gave me thoughts as to where I want to […]

A Centennial reminder… WW1 on the brain

February 10, 2013
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Fischer front

Just last week, while going through boxes still remaining from my move, I came across a small bag of buttons. I was glad to find them, and they served as a reminder that the centennial of the First World War (though I can’t say for sure that some aren’t vintage WW2) is not too far […]

Posted in: The First World War

Not in the claims, and not in blue, but… some of the other Southern Unionists of Harpers Ferry

February 9, 2013
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Most of the buildings destroyed by Maj. Tyndale were at "the Point", where this photo was taken. The Rohr boat incident took place just to the left of this image, on the Potomac River.

Though I often focus on the stories tucked-away in Southern Claims Commission applications, there were more Southern Unionists than those identified in the claims, or even in those who wore Union blue. There are also those Unionists who appear merely as a name in passing, in between the pages of a couple of books that […]

The “wafflers” (a rebel today; a yank tomorrow)

February 6, 2013
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From time to time, we see this sort on the big screen… a reb when the Confederate soldiers are present, and a yank when the Union soldiers are present. Take for example, the ferry boat man (“Sim Carstairs”), in the movie The Outlaw Josey Wales… So, encountering (by happenstance) what may be the “real deal” […]

Were USV enlistees making a statement… re: the great state of…EAST TENNESSEE?

February 2, 2013
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ETennessee

It’s been quite sometime since I’ve mentioned anything about the United States Volunteers. You know… the Confederate POWs who were offered a chance to get out of POW camp and serve in the U.S. Army. Anyway, recently, I was perusing the records of the USV* and noticed that, in their records of enlistment, the fellows […]

New blog focused on a Georgia family and Unionism

January 28, 2013
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It’s rare that this sort of thing pops-up, but when it does, I like to be quick to point it out… enter a new blog with Southern Unionism at the core… John Rogers’ “To Preserve Family and Farm”. The objective of John’s blog is as follows: To Preserve Family and Farm is the historical account of […]

Examples of compromised unconditional Southern Unionism

January 24, 2013
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Re-reading a book or re-watching a movie often make us realize things we didn’t earlier realize/see. So it goes with recent revisit of David Hunter Strother’s diaries in A Virginia Yankee in the Civil War. I never grow tired of reading his accounts, and with each reading I realize his Southern Unionism is more complex […]

How a picture and an antique beer bottle led to interesting ancestral connections… (conclusion)

January 20, 2013
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Mooremen

Picking-up where I left off in yesterday’s post… Ah, yes, but even Draden’s association with alcohol distribution runs further back than that. The 1880s census shows him, as of June 2nd of that year, as a “Bar Keeper”, and boarding at the hotel (“The Crawford”, located on Main Street) owned by W.D.F. Duval, in Salem, Roanoke […]

How a picture and an antique beer bottle led to interesting ancestral connections… (part 1)

January 19, 2013
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CCMoorebottle6

Sometime in the 1980s, I received a photocopy of a picture (ca. 1887-89) from one of my distant cousins. It showed three men (and a dog & horse) standing in front of a C.C. Moore bottling wagon. I took it that the three men were my third great grandfather, Cyrus S. Moore, and my gg […]

Georgia on my mind… and a different sort of Southern Unionist

January 18, 2013
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gearyclaim

While the Shenandoah Valley is first in my heart among favorite places, Georgia holds a very special place in it as well… specifically, coastal Georgia. That’s where my mind seemed to wonder off this past weekend, as temps here in the Valley teetered between the upper 50s/lower 60s. That’s weather reminiscent of winters in coastal […]

The future of Civil War history entails ___ (fill-in the blank)

January 14, 2013
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History is an interesting field. There are a wide variety of practitioners, some on the “inside”, some on the “outside”, and some, to some degree, with one foot in both (some overlapping occasionally, and some on a regular basis). But, the inside/outside thing is a matter of perspective. People work in certain circles, and from within […]

Coincidence?

January 2, 2013
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Off topic… sorta, but… In the last week, I’ve scored three major pieces on Ebay; at least “major” to me, personally. All three have to do with my Moore family, specifically rooted in my third great grandfather (the same one I mentioned in the blog post the other day) or his sons. The first piece […]

Another perspective on Emancipation Day

January 1, 2013
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Looking toward the grave of James Draper Moore, in April, 1997. At the time, the headstone was marked with inaccurate descriptive information... wrong name and state, but correct grave number.

It didn’t dawn on me until I read a post on Facebook… Yes, I know it’s the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, and I’ve been keenly aware of that since midnight. Some see the document and its reach as meaningless, but those who do so seem to look at it more from the surface… […]

McClellan’s “lockjaw” boats

December 29, 2012
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canalboat1925part2

With an absence of posts for about two weeks, I’m hoping readers had a pleasant Christmas. I know I did, and, though posts weren’t anywhere to be found, work continued behind the scenes (as always). In addition to working a little, here and there, on my book, I’ve been honored with a request to write […]

What happened to Capt. Henry’s Napoleon?

December 14, 2012
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I meant to include this as a footnote in yesterday’s post, but… having forgotten to do so… … and at the risk of sounding like a Fredericksburg Sesqui post from To the Sound of the Guns (… another great Sesqui-timed post, by the way, about the locations of guns on the battlefields)… Henry’s Napoleon is still […]

Fredericksburg150 – That “other guy” on the Confederate right: Capt. Mathias Winston Henry

December 13, 2012
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MWH3

No, not about Southern Unionists or the Valley… but there’s a tie to the Valley… just wait for it a bit. In Don Troiani’s print, “Bronze Guns and Iron Men”, there is an officer other than John Pelham, just behind the Napoleon, with binoculars in hand. To most, it might appear like a section commander… […]

… and, yes… Southern Unionists also charged the stone wall at Fredericksburg.

December 13, 2012
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I’ll get back to my discussion of the civilian Southern Unionists who lived in and around Fredericksburg. There’s some interesting twists and turns that I’ve come across… not what I was looking for, but… and it may be that posts about some of these folks will span from this month through May. But… today being the 150th […]

Southern Unionists & Fredericksburg 150: the Willoughby/Montieth Claim

December 8, 2012
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For me, diving into the Southern Claims Commission applications is about like a 5 year-old digging through a Cracker Jack box for the toy. You never know what you might get… sometimes something really cool, other times you end up a little disappointed. O.K., O.K…. I’m on the level about the thrill, but regarding the […]

Southern Unionists around Fredericksburg

December 8, 2012
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As Sesqui events kick-off in Fredericksburg this weekend, leading-up to the anniversary of the battle this coming Thursday, I figured this would be a good subject to bring forward at this particular time. In retrospect, it might have been a good thing to do since the beginning of the Sesquicentennial… write short pieces, now and then, in conjunction […]

Bloggers and engagement: an exercise

December 7, 2012
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I kinda figured this would come before my Southern Unionist post, so… pardon the slight alteration in path… Could it have been approached in a more effective and rewarding way? Perhaps. Allow me to approach this from a different angle. The intent remains the same and it is nothing to be taken personally… I mean it. […]

Saving work… something most of us will regret not doing… maybe

December 7, 2012
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I cringe somewhat for bringing this up, because I don’t want it to sound like this blog is turning into a WordPress Basics blog, but… considering concerns voiced about the preservation of content in comments from my post “What’s the future look like for your blogged labors of love?“, I thought it might be a good idea to remind folks […]

Jackson’s gone

December 6, 2012
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RoutzahnStonewall

Some might expect to see this title this coming May. Others might get what I’m saying, realizing that I’m referring to Jackson leaving the Valley, 150 years ago last month. As things were I just wasn’t able to post within the Sesqui envelope, in conjunction with the actual dates… but it was on my mind […]