Browsing All Posts filed under »Visualizing History«

Was it that the farthest parts of western Virginia didn’t feel threatened?

December 18, 2010 by

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Was it… the right to own slaves, without interference… or… “States’ rights”? When it all boils down, what do we see? Let’s visualize slavery in Virginia, in 1860. From The Secession Movement in Virginia, 1847-1861 (1934), by Henry T. Shanks. When it comes down to what portions of Virginia did and did not secede, is […]

Complex connections

November 22, 2010 by

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I saw this today, and the first thing I thought was, “oh, I bet Harry would be interested in this”… The thing is, I was looking for the headstones of David Hunter Strother’s (aka Porte Crayon… or, around these parts, simply, “The Porte“) parents. Well, this stone was not ten feet from John Strother’s stone… […]

Excellent overview of elections leading up to the war

November 18, 2010 by

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Hat tip to Kevin Levin for pointing this out on Twitter. I’ve presented some short pieces about mid-19th century elections here before (here, here, and here), but the following video shows just how complicated it is to gather meaning from those elections. As Dr. Ayers says that we can’t look at the elections from the […]

Immersive experiential history

November 13, 2010 by

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From time to time, I discuss the “architecture” and development of digital history, and one area that fascinates me most is the potential for creating immersive experiential history (and yes, just a few steps short of the holodeck) In its present form, I don’t think the tools for the Web are great enough to do […]

The Presidential election of 1860: National Results… and results in the Shenandoah Valley

November 6, 2010 by

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On this day, 150 years ago, people voted… and, laid-out on maps, the results were as follows (the top map is much more detailed, but I regret to say, I can’t find a better image): In the Shenandoah Valley, the the popular vote was… County Abraham Lincoln (Republican) John Bell (Constitutional Union) John C. Breckinridge […]

The Albemarle Barracks burial site

November 6, 2010 by

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For a number of months, I’ve been wanting to track down the site of Albemarle Barracks, but my travels across the Blue Ridge to Charlottesville haven’t offered an opportunity to take the time… until yesterday. There are lots of places in one particular area of “the ‘ville” that indicate the former presence of Hessians, but […]

Meem’s Bottom Covered Bridge

November 2, 2010 by

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I get this “historic-stuff-seeking urge” to pull-off I-81 at times, during my weekly commutes… this is where I snapped some quick photos today… … and while we’re at it, let’s take a look back toward the Massanutten from the bridge… you may recall my mentioning something about Meem’s Bottom in my post, “Why Cenantua?“. This […]

An execution… a ghost’s last hymn… and a curse fulfilled(?)

October 31, 2010 by

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As I’ve mentioned several times in my postings throughout the month, October brings to mind stories of witches and ghosts, but one ghost story captures my thinking frequently throughout the month. I suppose, one can almost say that it literally “haunts” me. The story actually developed over time, with each piece of information I uncovered […]

On the Death of Mrs. Fannie S. Gibbons…

October 22, 2010 by

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THE breath of Spring is nigh–it comes once more To glad the Earth where Winter’s frown hath been, And violets their fragrant incense pour On flowery paths, through dewy meadows green; But all in vain they smile for us–we mourn For thee, sweet Blossom, from our bosoms torn. The birds, gay warblers, flit from tree […]

Death and Mourning in the Civil War… courtesy of the Museum of the Confederacy

October 21, 2010 by

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Reflections…

October 17, 2010 by

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Ah, Sunday morning… a fire is in the wood-stove to cut the morning chill, a warm cup of coffee sits nearby as I sit down to transcribe more of Strother’s recollections for appearance here later this afternoon. As I do so, I wonder why so many are more fascinated with the events on the battlefields […]

I bet Ben would have liked blogging…

October 16, 2010 by

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If he would inform, he must advance regularly from Things known to things unknown, distinctly without Confusion, and the lower he begins the better. It is a common Fault in Writers, to allow their Readers too much knowledge: They begin with that which should be the Middle, and skipping backwards and forwards, ’tis impossible for […]

FYI… “ghosting” Staunton tonight

October 15, 2010 by

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More to follow… I hope.

Plumb Grove – home of Jonathan Nesbitt, Jr.

October 11, 2010 by

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I’ve got some photos that I took a couple of weeks back while on my road trip to Four Locks and Clear Spring, and I thought that I might as well put them on here for everyone to enjoy. I didn’t include them in the tour that weekend because there is no known tie between […]

How did the doctor “take care” of the witch?

October 8, 2010 by

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Just thinking back to how the doctor “saw to it” that the witch that “cursed” my great-great grandmother would be “in hell by morning.” Frankly, we will probably never know his method, and will wonder about the wide range of possibilities. Still, Samuel Kercheval did mention a couple of methods by which one could “cure… […]

Doc Amiss’ ghost story

October 3, 2010 by

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I’m really not a fan of modern ghost tours and “ghosts of history”-type books. For one thing, I get the impression that the stories being delivered are so incredibly embellished over the years, that they miss the meaty content of the stories told in years past; more fluff than solid content. I know, I know… […]

About Geotag blogging

October 2, 2010 by

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http://www.emich.be/en/2007/03/29/wordpress-geotagging-plugin/

Geotag test 2- Confederate section, Thornrose Cemetery

October 2, 2010 by

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Just a test of the Geotag feature, but, while I’m here… this section of land was used for burying both Union and Confederate dead who usually died while in the Confederate hospital that I just mentioned in the last post. The Union dead were later removed to the National Cemetery just to the east, and […]

Backtrack to Dam 5

September 26, 2010 by

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I couldn’t resist… Dam 5 offers one of those rare opportunities to expand on Cyrus’ story, though, at best, it’s an indirect weave into the overall story. But before I start, I have to say, its incredibly cool to live blog on the move. You see, I’m sitting on the stone ledge above the roaring […]

Walking in the shadow of Cyrus – 2:19 p.m., 9/25/2010

September 25, 2010 by

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This is the first part of a different sort of post… carried over the course of the next 16 hours or so. Call it an experiment, if you like… on a couple of levels actually. I’m checking-out the potential uses for live, roaming blogging, and, it so happens that I’m staying tonight in one of […]

One of my finds while in Kansas City

September 15, 2010 by

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No, not Civil War-related, but family-related… I had just finished visiting the National World War I Museum, and having spotted the Spanish-American War Monument, I drove over to it to snap a shot or two. But then, I saw this monument on a hill within site of the Span-Am monument. Intrigued, I took a walk […]

The C&O Canal in 1917, courtesy of Thomas A. Edison…

September 13, 2010 by

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When scrolling through YouTube last night in search of Seldom Scene’s rendition of the C&O Canal, I also found this rare treat. Just keep in mind, these are silent, but the scenes of cargo-hauling boats moving along the canal is something that has been lost to the ages. Part III has some great moving imagery […]

Seldom Scene’s rendition of the C&O Canal

September 12, 2010 by

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As those who frequent this blog know, I also have interests in the history of the C&O Canal. So, when I saw this, I thought I’d share… “Hey, hey, hey, Lock Ready!” For more video footage of the canal, but in action in 1917, check out the follow-up post.

When a little goes a long way

September 8, 2010 by

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Taking time to walk through the Winchester National Cemetery, it’s obvious the purpose for which this cemetery was made… as a place in which to bury (actually, rebury) Union soldiers. In addition to the graves that dot this relatively small parcel of land, there are also a number of monuments recognizing the sacrifices of men […]