Browsing All Posts filed under »Virginia in the Civil War«

Southern Unionists & Fredericksburg 150: the Willoughby/Montieth Claim

December 8, 2012 by

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For me, diving into the Southern Claims Commission applications is about like a 5 year-old digging through a Cracker Jack box for the toy. You never know what you might get… sometimes something really cool, other times you end up a little disappointed. O.K., O.K…. I’m on the level about the thrill, but regarding the […]

Southern Unionists around Fredericksburg

December 8, 2012 by

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As Sesqui events kick-off in Fredericksburg this weekend, leading-up to the anniversary of the battle this coming Thursday, I figured this would be a good subject to bring forward at this particular time. In retrospect, it might have been a good thing to do since the beginning of the Sesquicentennial… write short pieces, now and then, in conjunction […]

Jackson’s gone

December 6, 2012 by

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Some might expect to see this title this coming May. Others might get what I’m saying, realizing that I’m referring to Jackson leaving the Valley, 150 years ago last month. As things were I just wasn’t able to post within the Sesqui envelope, in conjunction with the actual dates… but it was on my mind […]

Schmucker’s ties to the Shenandoah Valley Lutheran community, and his abolitionist interests

September 28, 2012 by

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This past weekend, reader/blogger Vince (of Lancaster at War) suggested something that sounded worth further investigation… and I was soon on the hunt, looking to see how Samuel Simon Schmucker may have impacted Lutheran ministers in the Shenandoah Valley. Since Schmucker was head of the Gettysburg Seminary during the decades (to be specific, 1826-1864) leading-up […]

German influence in the Shenandoah Valley… even into the Civil War

September 23, 2012 by

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I posed a question yesterday… But, how far back, before the 1850s, is it necessary to take such a study? Of course, I meant, specifically… how the varying sentiments during the Civil War era South came to be… and how they might be traceable  to earlier points in time. Again, as one who concentrates heavily […]

Southern… but at what point did “alternative roads” course outward?

September 22, 2012 by

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There’s a great deal of time and effort spent at looking at Southerners in the Civil War, and in the years leading-up to the secession crisis. We see several books, articles, blog posts, etc. focused on “what they were fighting for” (in this instance, one could say this statement applies to both Southern Confederates and Southern Unionists), […]

“It is a good time of the day”: Antietam

September 16, 2012 by

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I’ve stopped briefly, after my walk from the Visitor’s Center to the Bloody Lane tower. Part of me considers the civilians on this day, 150 years ago… their concerns of what might yet come. Part of me considers relatives in gray, on the next day, near Dunker Church… Part of me considers relatives in blue, […]

Reflections on the Brawner Farm

August 28, 2012 by

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It’s usually not my practice to post things without giving them much thought (at least from what you, the reader can see in my words here… but I’m surely giving it thought “off-paper” or, considering the platform… “off-web”), but… in that this is almost 150 years to the hour since it began, this evening my […]

The confectioner Southern Unionist of Harpers Ferry… and his Unionist son

August 24, 2012 by

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Before writing this, I probably should have posted something about the rifts between some Southern fathers and sons, when it came to sentiments in the war, but I’ll get around to it. Tonight, I’m focusing instead on Frederick Augustus Roeder. The name might be familiar, especially if you’ve visited Harpers Ferry. Yes, THAT Frederick Roeder, […]

“You must choose & choose at once.”

August 15, 2012 by

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Back, just an hour or so ago, from a pleasant evening drive… prompted by the writing of this post. I realized that the Southern Unionist at the center of this post rests in a cemetery not terribly far from my home. So, I ventured out… and visited Daniel and Mary Brindle. Daniel was Pennsylvania-born, but […]

Did Pope’s orders go too far… even further than he imagined?

August 14, 2012 by

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 19. HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA, Near Cedar Mountain, Va., August 14, 1862. The major-general commanding discovers with great dissatisfaction that General Orders, No. 5, requiring that the troops of this command be subsisted on the country in which their operations are conducted, has either been entirely misinterpreted or grossly abused by many […]

On the trail of Stonewall’s Winchester photographer

August 12, 2012 by

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Having spent the day out and about yesterday, on Rt. 11, in what is known as the famous (and growing) “Rt. 11 Yard Crawl”, I lucked into landing several Carte de Visite (CDVs) and cabinet cards from a number of photographers from the mid-19th century. There were several from New York, one from Philadelphia, and […]

I am a beneficiary of hard war

July 30, 2012 by

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I don’t know, but it seems to sound about as silly as saying “I’m a victim of Sherman… or Sheridan… or fill-in name here. So let me try the “victim” angle again. Instead of “victim”, how about refering to oneself as… “One who suffers the long-term ill-effects that the war laid upon my poor departed kin-folk, so […]

Von Steinwehr comes to Luray

July 26, 2012 by

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Still present in the Shenandoah Valley, Union forces (I can’t help but keep bringing up that Jackson had not cleared the Valley with the battles of Cross Keys and Port Republic) made their presence all-the-more known 150 years ago, over the next few weeks. On July 21, a force (brigade strength) probed toward Luray, and, by […]

… and a little more with Gen. Order No. 11

July 23, 2012 by

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John Pope wasn’t quite done yet… and on this day, 150 years ago, he released another general order of interest… GENERAL ORDERS No. 11. HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA, Washington, July 23, 1862. Commanders of army corps, divisions, brigades, and detached commands will proceed immediately to arrest all disloyal male citizens within their lines or within their […]

Sesqui moment of the day: The war gets harder in Va…. with a parallel in Mississippi

July 20, 2012 by

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I feel a need to bring up my blog post from July 4. Remember what John Mead Gould was thinking? He also resented the treatment of the Southern people he had encountered, despite what he considered, “kindness” of Union soldiers toward those same people. With all of this in mind, he began to reconsider the approach… […]

No hard feelings among old enemies? – Former Confederates & Southern Unionists

July 19, 2012 by

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I don’t think that such a claim can be made across the board, though I’ve seen evidence to support the thought that some continued to hold bitterness toward those who had proven themselves as Southern Unionists. Even so, for the most part, in my neck o’ the woods of Virginia, I think the evidence (even […]

A Sesqui moment: some key ingredients of the Southern Claims process

July 18, 2012 by

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Enter Gen. John Pope’s General Order No. 5, which was issued 150 years ago today. Alas… key elements in the Southern Claims application process… 1) “In an area where the Union army was to subsist upon the country…” 2) “Vouchers will be given to the owners… payable at the conclusion of the war, upon…” 3) […]

Southern Unionist? Liar, liar, pants on fire!

July 17, 2012 by

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In my exchanges, over the years, some folks have indicated that they thought some Southern Claims applicants were lying. Well, yes some were, but I have to ask… “How have you identified those who you think were lying?” It’s not always so easy. Sometimes, however, it’s painfully obvious… and one doesn’t have to read between […]

“I don’t think there were really that many”

July 13, 2012 by

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Not so much a matter of content delivery this morning, and more about a thought that’s been lingering with me for a bit… About a month ago, a friend of mine attended a reenactment, here in the Valley (the Cross Keys/Port Republic event held on… the Cedar Creek battlefield). When he had an opportunity to talk […]

“… he… was not going to vote for a slave government.”

July 11, 2012 by

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The argument can be common. The war was about slavery vs. the war was not about slavery. Usually, when those two points of view collide, the result is a string of reasons why… coming from both sides. More significant to me are the accounts of people who lived in that time… and even better if […]

“Did people call him a Union man?” “Yes, sir, and a great many called him a damn Yankee all the time.”

July 7, 2012 by

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My attention to the details of his life just weren’t there… it seemed they didn’t need to be… as a father-in-law to one of my distant uncles, John William Neer was an indirect link in the family tree… and, at one time, I knew nothing of his life, other than that indirect connection. Over time, […]

The Fourth of July in the Shenandoah… in 1862

July 4, 2012 by

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I looked through a few of the resources I have at my disposal, for accounts of Union soldiers who remained in the Shenandoah Valley, and were still present here, on July 4, 1862. Regretfully, I could only come up with two accounts that were either written on that day, or described, in brief, what happened […]

A Sesqui reflection… the Charlottesville Artillery at Malvern Hill

July 1, 2012 by

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Up and moving again on the morning of July 1, Carrington’s Battery reached the action at Malvern Hill between 2 and 3 p.m. Once there the company took shelter in a wooded area and out of sight of the enemy. Even so, enemy shells came in on them. “Finding myself in the presence of ‘Stonewall’, […]