Browsing All Posts filed under »The First World War«

A Centennial reminder… WW1 on the brain

February 10, 2013 by

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Just last week, while going through boxes still remaining from my move, I came across a small bag of buttons. I was glad to find them, and they served as a reminder that the centennial of the First World War (though I can’t say for sure that some aren’t vintage WW2) is not too far […]

War Horse… my take on it

January 15, 2012 by

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Rarely taking the opportunity to write about World War I (much less anything else as of late :) ), I have to say… regarding War Horse, well, it’s not just a World War I movie… but that’s cool, really, because, overall, it’s just a rich, enjoyable movie. In fact, I got the sense that it […]

The South and her contributions to the US military since the American Civil War

October 9, 2011 by

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I have no doubt that the South has, through the years since the American Civil War, contributed significant numbers to the ranks of the US military… and has much to be proud of, for her contributions. But, when it comes down to a break-down of numbers… has the South contributed more than the geographic area […]

Three generations of Conrads from Winchester

July 16, 2011 by

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As those who read this blog know, I have a couple of interests other than the American Civil War, and, occasionally, wires cross… not for the worse, but usually resulting in something interesting. Take for example, my interests in the 116th Infantry from the Shenandoah Valley in the First World War. One of the men […]

Is the First World War small in importance in the U.S.?

June 15, 2011 by

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I’ve still got that post coming about the Jessie Scout, but, I’ve been thinking… Is the First World War one of the least examined wars in the history of the United States? If so, why do you think so? If not, why? Maybe you should read this Memorial Day write-up (from 2008) by UVa Prof. […]

Tangents… and looking for “intersections”, part 1

June 12, 2011 by

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This past week, I’ve found myself distracted from the standard Sesqui followings. Maybe it’s because I just haven’t felt like there’s much to say, regarding what happened at this time (almost mid-June), 150 years ago. Not to say that there wasn’t a lot going on at that time… Anyway, as I am one to go […]

Better than pictures; a few interviews with Frank Buckles

March 5, 2011 by

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Making a case for “the others who are gone”: “The First World War is not understood, or well remembered in the United States”:

Hey, Congress! We, the People, want to honor OUR last World War I veteran, APPROPRIATELY.

March 5, 2011 by

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As most everyone should know by know, our last World War I veteran passed away earlier this week. No, Frank Buckles didn’t cross the no-man’s land, fighting from trench to trench. He wasn’t one of the famous flyboys. He wasn’t an officer. He wasn’t even wounded. BUT, he was there, and he was the last […]

Another Confederate veteran and his Doughboy son…

September 5, 2010 by

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I remembered coming across this image several years back, while writing one of the unit histories for the Virginia Regimental Histories Series. Seated is George William Koontz (1839-1925) of Shenandoah County, Virginia. Though he had relocated to Highland County in 1854, at the opening of the Civil War, he returned to Shenandoah County and enlisted […]

A clash of “tennials”

September 2, 2010 by

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As we are all aware, we are now in the midst of the Civil War Sesquicentennial. Things have been underway for a while, and, as Kevin points out… while it might not be as big a deal as some might hope, there is still… something, somewhere going on. Oftentimes, there is more going on than […]

A vast pool of eager workers!

August 26, 2010 by

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Slightly off the WWI path, but connected to yesterday’s post when comparing thoughts on the Confederate draft and that imposed during the First World War… The Civil War-era furnace operations were extensive in Page County, with three furnaces and at least two forges in operation. Men were required to cut down trees, make charcoal, mine […]

Registering for the draft… June, 1917

August 25, 2010 by

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From the Page News and Courier (Luray, Va.), June 1, 1917: No Lunacy in Page County The people of Page County are a law abiding people, and are remarkable for their thrift and common sense. For these reasons we believe the young man of Page county prefer registering to being registered. They will register because […]

The formation of the 29th Division – the Blue-Gray Division

August 23, 2010 by

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From p. 16 of History of the Twenty-Ninth Division, “Blue and Gray”, 1917-1919: It was soon realized that a divisional spirit or espirit must be encouraged, since the old organizations had been broken up. Remembering that the organizations in the War between the States which had special names or distinctive designations acquitted themselves unusually well, […]

Sending off “the boys” from Luray

August 20, 2010 by

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Wish this would have scanned a little more clear. Nonetheless, I was mistaken about the combination of Confederate flags and U.S. flags in this photo… albeit, there are Confederate veterans. In fact, first man in the front on the left (the older gentlemen) was a captain, and former commanding officer of Co. K, 10th Virginia […]

Imagined “memory” vs. Realized/actual memory

August 18, 2010 by

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Somewhere in my diminished amount of free time lately, I’ve spent some time investigating the realized/actual memory of Southerners at the time of WW1 and even during the Spanish-American War, and all I can say at this point is that it baffles me when it comes to some, today, who suggest that their comments/”position” are/is […]

The Southern connection between WW1 and the Civil War

August 14, 2010 by

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Sure, the circumstances were different… 1861 and 1918 were different times. But were people really all that different? Consider this… if we don’t take time to consider the complicating factors behind how men became part of the two armies (Confederate and the AEF), then it becomes convenient… even easy to reflect merely on numbers and […]

Yes, but would you really want to have lived back then?

August 13, 2010 by

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Quick post based on passing thought. How many who study the Civil War would like the chance to experience it? Be that for a day, a week, a month… or whatever… how many actually “try” to experience it through living history, reenactments, etc. Now, how many would like to give WW1 a try? As for […]

WW1 numbers per state

August 13, 2010 by

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What does all of this mean? Stay tuned for more discussion… Photo of an exhibit panel at the National WW1 Museum in Kansas City. * Sorry… the image isn’t as clear as I would prefer, but about the best I can do with the features available with the Droid.

“Hell no, our kids won’t go!”

July 30, 2010 by

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I was going to post another installment of D.H. Strother’s “Recollections” today, but will hold off till tomorrow. I saw something posted by David over at Inconvenient South that caught my eye. David cites an article (from The Journal of American History, and written by Jeanette Keith) published in 2001 focused on Southern draft resistance […]