Browsing All Posts filed under »historical memory«

One site, multiple angles for interpretation

December 19, 2010 by

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One of my favorite historic sites in Page County, Virginia is Catherine’s Furnace. Because of efforts made in the early 2000s, the site has one Virginia Civil War Trails marker. I was fortunate to be involved in deciding that the site merited a marker, and I also wrote the text and provided images for the […]

Thinking of Southern Unionists under different terms

November 28, 2010 by

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I had been thinking about this for a while, but yesterday, while watching the latest Harry Potter movie, I caught myself thinking of Southern Unionists in a different light (yes, I know… of all things, how would I think about Southern Unionists in a Harry Potter movie… I suppose I’m hopeless…). Why did I think […]

Virginia’s textbook ordeal: thinking beyond “Black Confederates”

November 17, 2010 by

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Not long after the controversy over Virginia’s 4th grade history text began, like a number of others, I gave some thoughts about the mention of “Black Confederates” as well, but didn’t go beyond the single post. Yet, in the weeks that followed, I began to think more of what this means. Let’s focus specifically on […]

It’s 1860. Who do you vote for?

November 2, 2010 by

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Not the exact date, but today is election day… and on election day 150 years ago, in 1860, a good deal was at stake. So, who do you vote for? Strike that… who would get your ancestors’ votes? Lincoln, Douglas, Breckinridge, or Bell… and why? Without looking, do you know their platforms? After all, a […]

Reflections…

October 17, 2010 by

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Ah, Sunday morning… a fire is in the wood-stove to cut the morning chill, a warm cup of coffee sits nearby as I sit down to transcribe more of Strother’s recollections for appearance here later this afternoon. As I do so, I wonder why so many are more fascinated with the events on the battlefields […]

I bet Ben would have liked blogging…

October 16, 2010 by

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If he would inform, he must advance regularly from Things known to things unknown, distinctly without Confusion, and the lower he begins the better. It is a common Fault in Writers, to allow their Readers too much knowledge: They begin with that which should be the Middle, and skipping backwards and forwards, ’tis impossible for […]

FYI… “ghosting” Staunton tonight

October 15, 2010 by

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More to follow… I hope.

“water of many turns”

October 9, 2010 by

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Just the other day, I made reference to the Lenape/Delaware word “Conococheague“, which means “water of many turns.” Funny, but that pretty much summarizes the way I write this blog… not to mention the fluid nature of many blogs. The content can turn, twist, and completely shift, without warning. It’s more a reflection of what […]

The “fire witch”

October 9, 2010 by

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Just 146 years ago yesterday, the episode known as “The Burning” drew to a close in the Shenandoah Valley. Gen. Phil Sheridan had cut a swathe from Augusta County, north into Rockingham, Page, and Shenandoah Counties before coming to a halt around Strasburg, Virginia. No doubt, the devastation to the “breadbasket of the Confederacy” was […]

How did the doctor “take care” of the witch?

October 8, 2010 by

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Just thinking back to how the doctor “saw to it” that the witch that “cursed” my great-great grandmother would be “in hell by morning.” Frankly, we will probably never know his method, and will wonder about the wide range of possibilities. Still, Samuel Kercheval did mention a couple of methods by which one could “cure… […]

Why “Cenantua”?

October 6, 2010 by

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I love this time of year. It’s a chilly day, the sky is overcast… … I have a fire in the wood stove… … and a relaxing cup of cappuccino in my manly-man Mickey Mouse coffee mug (what else??!!) is close at-hand. Feels like a good time to sit down and write… just wish I […]

Occupations in the afterlife: 101

October 5, 2010 by

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So… “Eb”… did ya ever think you’d get a gig as a bookend in the afterlife? On top of that, did ya ever think you’d be a bookend for books about Confederate units? “Confederate”? Errr, probably not. But seriously, I love New England headstone art. I picked this up at, of all places (I just […]

More on the old-time belief in witches in the central Shenandoah Valley

October 4, 2010 by

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Alright, picking-up from my post from Saturday, I was thinking that maybe I need a little more information supporting the claim that I made that witches were more common in 19th century Page County (and the central Shenandoah Valley) than some may realize. So… In February 1930, in his “Jacob’s Well” column, Jacob R. Seekford […]

So, finally… this Confederate vet and the witch…

October 2, 2010 by

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    One of my great-great grandfathers, Charles Robert “Tanner” Hillard, was born on October 3, 1844 (in fact, that will be 166 years ago… tomorrow), a son of Jacob (1784-1864) and Phoebe Elliott Hilliard (ca. 1822-???). As for the Civil War part goes… Charles’ younger brother, Jacob, hired himself out as a substitute (for […]

Backtrack to Dam 5

September 26, 2010 by

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I couldn’t resist… Dam 5 offers one of those rare opportunities to expand on Cyrus’ story, though, at best, it’s an indirect weave into the overall story. But before I start, I have to say, its incredibly cool to live blog on the move. You see, I’m sitting on the stone ledge above the roaring […]

Walking in the shadow of Cyrus – 2:19 p.m., 9/25/2010

September 25, 2010 by

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This is the first part of a different sort of post… carried over the course of the next 16 hours or so. Call it an experiment, if you like… on a couple of levels actually. I’m checking-out the potential uses for live, roaming blogging, and, it so happens that I’m staying tonight in one of […]

One of my finds while in Kansas City

September 15, 2010 by

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No, not Civil War-related, but family-related… I had just finished visiting the National World War I Museum, and having spotted the Spanish-American War Monument, I drove over to it to snap a shot or two. But then, I saw this monument on a hill within site of the Span-Am monument. Intrigued, I took a walk […]

Seldom Scene’s rendition of the C&O Canal

September 12, 2010 by

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As those who frequent this blog know, I also have interests in the history of the C&O Canal. So, when I saw this, I thought I’d share… “Hey, hey, hey, Lock Ready!” For more video footage of the canal, but in action in 1917, check out the follow-up post.

When a little goes a long way

September 8, 2010 by

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Taking time to walk through the Winchester National Cemetery, it’s obvious the purpose for which this cemetery was made… as a place in which to bury (actually, rebury) Union soldiers. In addition to the graves that dot this relatively small parcel of land, there are also a number of monuments recognizing the sacrifices of men […]

The Milam Apple

September 7, 2010 by

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Those who are regulars here know that I have an interest in antique apples. Among those varieties is the Milam. In all likelihood, most who read this probably won’t know about this variety. It’s not as popular as those you find in the grocery stores today… at least not popular today as it was in […]

An interesting passage from Foster’s Ghosts of the Confederacy

August 24, 2010 by

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“‘It would have pleased you to know and have heard the wild rebel yell echoing from the ancient walls of Manila, the son of a Virginia Confederate informed former Confederate general E.P. Alexander after the war [Spanish-American War]. ‘We of the younger generation owe you of ’61 a debt of gratitude and admiration for the […]

Yes, but would you really want to have lived back then?

August 13, 2010 by

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Quick post based on passing thought. How many who study the Civil War would like the chance to experience it? Be that for a day, a week, a month… or whatever… how many actually “try” to experience it through living history, reenactments, etc. Now, how many would like to give WW1 a try? As for […]

The voice of the Southern people left unheard…

April 26, 2010 by

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Took a little “virtual walk” among some items in the Valley of the Shadow today and found quite a bit that was of interest, but wanted to throw these out for consideration… all from the Feb. 26, 1861 issue of the Staunton Spectator… The Natchez Courier “Contends that the people of Natchez were not in […]

History-focused Memorials/Monuments and History Months

April 22, 2010 by

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I enjoy the occasional visit to “Walking in the Berkshires” and, while I haven’t visited the blog much recently, I spent a little while the other day catching-up on a few posts made over the past few months. I found the post focused on the controversy surrounding South Carolina’s Secession Ordinance Monument quite enlightening. When […]