Browsing All Posts filed under »digital rhetoric«

It’s the little things… an evaluation of blogging’s “seedlings” on the Web

February 28, 2013 by

6

Some folks obsess on numbers; some way too much. Some even write to score numbers. That’s fine. To each his/her own. Don’t get me wrong, I like to see that folks are visiting the blog, but I’ve moved on from the “obsessed by numbers phase”. In my first year or two of writing the blog… oh, yes; […]

The future of Civil War history entails ___ (fill-in the blank)

January 14, 2013 by

12

History is an interesting field. There are a wide variety of practitioners, some on the “inside”, some on the “outside”, and some, to some degree, with one foot in both (some overlapping occasionally, and some on a regular basis). But, the inside/outside thing is a matter of perspective. People work in certain circles, and from within […]

Rhetorical approaches to Civil War blogging?

July 31, 2012 by

8

Are they obvious… or subtle? I don’t think everyone has a point to make… unless, of course, you also want to consider straight-out information distribution as a way to convince others that the Civil War and/or particular aspects of it ARE important. In that case, yes… there is rhetoric involved, to some degree. But, how much […]

Empowering words… more… through the “writing space”

July 6, 2012 by

12

I don’t get to write about it much, or perhaps I should say, I don’t take as much time as I would like, to write about it… … but, what is in the power of an assembled collection of written words? Obviously, there are masters of this sort of thing, at least, more obviously… in print media. All […]

And you thought electronically delivered history was all about the content…

February 13, 2012 by

1

… and you thought all I focus on is history… humpf! I keep telling people, electronically delivered history isn’t simply a matter of a new platform (the Web) for a place to put stuff (aka the same old print media layout and design)… and this round of books in the pic above, being packed-up for […]

Southern by the grace of cornbread!

February 23, 2011 by

21

Thinking about Craig’s post from the other day, I remembered something I’ve been meaning to post about cornbread… yes, cornbread. Now cornbread has become known as something distinctly “Southron”, but appears to  have origins with the Native People of what is now the southeastern U.S. (references vary, but among those suggested as originators are the […]

An against the grain Southerner… I suppose.

December 29, 2010 by

6

Brooks Simpson’s recent post got me thinking… For some Southerners, maybe it’s just a little too easy to dismiss a Northerner when he/she writes about the history of the Civil War era South. For these same Southerners… when confronted with another Southerner who writes not so much in harmony with the Lost Cause ideology… what […]

Immersive experiential history

November 13, 2010 by

0

From time to time, I discuss the “architecture” and development of digital history, and one area that fascinates me most is the potential for creating immersive experiential history (and yes, just a few steps short of the holodeck) In its present form, I don’t think the tools for the Web are great enough to do […]

An execution… a ghost’s last hymn… and a curse fulfilled(?)

October 31, 2010 by

13

As I’ve mentioned several times in my postings throughout the month, October brings to mind stories of witches and ghosts, but one ghost story captures my thinking frequently throughout the month. I suppose, one can almost say that it literally “haunts” me. The story actually developed over time, with each piece of information I uncovered […]

Why blog… and are you true to yourself in doing so?

October 30, 2010 by

15

In blogs, I think we see various forms of motivation among the respective bloggers. I suppose that many initiate a blog to share something with others… or tell people something. It is an outlet… an opportunity to share opinions and/or information, and to express self. The blog can serve as a canvas, upon which the blogger […]

I bet Ben would have liked blogging…

October 16, 2010 by

0

If he would inform, he must advance regularly from Things known to things unknown, distinctly without Confusion, and the lower he begins the better. It is a common Fault in Writers, to allow their Readers too much knowledge: They begin with that which should be the Middle, and skipping backwards and forwards, ’tis impossible for […]

Plumb Grove – home of Jonathan Nesbitt, Jr.

October 11, 2010 by

10

I’ve got some photos that I took a couple of weeks back while on my road trip to Four Locks and Clear Spring, and I thought that I might as well put them on here for everyone to enjoy. I didn’t include them in the tour that weekend because there is no known tie between […]

Sunday afternoons with “The Porte”, Part VII

October 10, 2010 by

1

What?! Did you think the entire month was going to be dedicated to ghosts, witches, and the generally eerie? On and off since May, I’ve been transcribing David Hunter Strother‘s “Personal Recollections of the Civil War. By a Virginian” as originally published in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, beginning in June 1866. Though I don’t transcribe […]

“water of many turns”

October 9, 2010 by

0

Just the other day, I made reference to the Lenape/Delaware word “Conococheague“, which means “water of many turns.” Funny, but that pretty much summarizes the way I write this blog… not to mention the fluid nature of many blogs. The content can turn, twist, and completely shift, without warning. It’s more a reflection of what […]

Why “Cenantua”?

October 6, 2010 by

16

I love this time of year. It’s a chilly day, the sky is overcast… … I have a fire in the wood stove… … and a relaxing cup of cappuccino in my manly-man Mickey Mouse coffee mug (what else??!!) is close at-hand. Feels like a good time to sit down and write… just wish I […]

How our expectations of interaction design impact our delivery as historians

August 31, 2010 by

2

I don’t think you see it on a massive scale at this time, but I think the historical author… the historical deliverer… is going to be challenged in times to come (if not already). We are trained, more or less, in a traditional style, centered mostly around print media. There is a certain way that […]

… and then there is the history-warping media…

April 13, 2010 by

16

While CNN and others challenge the idea of Virginia’s proclamation for Confederate History Month, I think it’s a fine time to point out that many in the media are doing an equal amount of injustice to history as those who want to take Confederate history down the “Moonlight and Magnolias” path. It’s really sad, but […]

Online discussion and digital literacy

January 5, 2010 by

0

I’m just throwing this out as a thought, but in seeing a good deal of activity lately in the way of discussions about “Black Confederates” a couple of things come to mind… but this isn’t so much about “Black Confederates” as a focus of discussion as it is about the use of technology to discuss […]

The difference between text in print and in the environment of Web 2.0

April 13, 2009 by

0

It’s tied to digital history and blogging, and I can certainly see it. Can you see the new power of texts in the digital environment? How can we use this power to improve presentation… interaction… and understanding of complex concepts? By the way, if it’s not obvious, I love this video and what it tells […]

Innovative use of video in blogging

April 7, 2009 by

8

Ok, this is crazy, but I’m, more or less triple posting on this subject. 1) I dropped a comment over at Michael Aubrecht’s blog about the integration of the video into his post of April 6 (yesterday)… then I… 2) made a comment on my digital rhetoric class blog about the same. Now… 3) I’m […]

“A printing press in every household”

March 3, 2009 by

0

Of course, I’m playing on Herbert Hoover’s “a chicken in every pot” remark.  I just saw this clip and thought it was entertaining considering so many, no matter their leanings, are active in the “public sphere.” Marx would be so happy! LOL! Regretfully, I couldn’t embed this clip, but I can point you in the right direction.