Browsing All Posts filed under »Ancestral tidbits«

Confederates by choice… or by circumstance?

May 3, 2014 by

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Here were are again… on the eve of a major period of Sesqui events. Just to the east, there is the Overland Campaign… and closer to home, here in the Shenandoah Valley… there is Sigel’s advance up the Valley. Yet, to me, there are more than troop movements and battles, especially when May of 1864 […]

Cole vs. Mosby: The end to a “rivalry”(?)

February 21, 2014 by

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February 21, 1864 was a Sunday. A good day, it seems, for an ending. Mosby had ordered his command to assemble at Piedmont to attend the funeral of Ranger Joseph McCobb (a rather elusive person to find in records, by the way), who had been killed (by a fall from his horse) in the fight, the day […]

From Belle Isle to warmer climate

February 19, 2014 by

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After experiencing life at Belle Isle (even after just a few months), the thought of heading south, to a new POW camp in Georgia may have had its perks. Warmer weather and healthier conditions may have come to the minds of Union prisoners of war, though the thought of being farther from home may have […]

“Wait a minute. Strike that; reverse it. Thank you.”

January 13, 2014 by

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Considering the quote from Willy Wonka, I think he would have loved the versatility of blogging over writing for print. But, apart from me finding the quote useful at this time, that’s the only connection that there is between this post and Willy Wonka… So, what is it, exactly, that I want to “strike and […]

Some shots from yesterday’s Loudoun Heights Sesqui Event

January 12, 2014 by

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I greatly enjoyed the chance, yesterday, to be part of the Loudoun Heights 150th commemorative event. It was nice to speak about my perspective, as a relative of two of Cole’s men… and I was glad to share the experience with one other descendant (friend, Mark Dudrow) of one of Cole’s men (Abraham Dern), who […]

Tomorrow’s Loudoun Heights Sesquicentennial event

January 10, 2014 by

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Though the 150th anniversary of Loudoun Heights is today… the actual commemorative event takes place tomorrow, January 11, 2014. As I’m related to two of Cole’s men (distant granduncle, Joseph Lake McKinney, and cousin James Draper Moore), I’m particularly honored to be a part of the event. I am slated to speak, for about 15 minutes, about the […]

45 minutes, and the long road to Andersonville

January 10, 2014 by

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As they say that it was around 4 a.m. when Mosby commenced the attack on Cole’s Camp, it was, therefore, likely no more than 15 minutes before that when the six troopers of Co. B were captured by Frank Stringfellow’s party of Rangers. I’ll borrow, again, Pvt. James A. Scott’s (of Co. C) poem regarding […]

Waiting for picket duty… Loudoun Heights

January 9, 2014 by

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Today, I’m thinking about seven troopers from Co. B, of Major Henry Cole’s 1st Potomac Home Brigade (Maryland) Cavalry… James Draper Moore, Walter Scott Myers, John Newcomber, Isaiah Nicewander, Abraham L. Sossey, George W. Weaver, and David Hamilton Wolf. Six of these men were waiting to go on picket duty, on this day, 150 year […]

I-81, North… to Scotland

January 5, 2014 by

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The Pennsylvania Farm Show is something that has become an annual destination of mine. It’s a great event, putting… as one would expect… Pennsylvania agriculture in the limelight. There’s lots to see, and I can’t return to Virginia without what I call “my annual re-provisioning of Pennsylvania agricultural goods.” Cheeses, venison summer sausage, mustards, horseradish… […]

Was New Year’s Day, ’64 a bad day for Uncle Joe?

January 1, 2014 by

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I’ve mentioned my 3rd great granduncle, Joseph Lake McKinney, in a few posts. In his service record, there is one entry that is a bit of a mystery to me… mostly because it’s not clear what the circumstances were behind a notation. I know a lot of folks like to talk more about an ancestor’s […]

To keep Confederates busy – the beginning of an active December in the Shenandoah

December 10, 2013 by

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“Stonewall” was gone and Gettysburg was over five months in the past… and, despite being overshadowed by other things in other places, the Shenandoah Valley was still an active arena. While Union Gen. William W. Averell pressed on the rail head of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, at Salem, his commanding officer, Brig. Gen. Benjamin […]

Another assist to Southern Unionists, under the Bowman and Tucker Acts

September 13, 2013 by

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I’ll get back to my current run on the discussion of literacy and literature in the antebellum Shenandoah Valley, but, as I promised… still having a deep and dedicated interest in Southern Unionism…  I know I’ve mentioned it before, that though a Southern Loyalist Claim might be barred or disallowed, it doesn’t necessarily mean that it […]

The socially elite, Southern writers of the 19th century, and their legacy

September 3, 2013 by

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I just responded to a comment on my post from yesterday, and thought that I should raise my thoughts to the level of a post. Who can we point to (among Southern writers/authors of the 19th century), for having had the most influence on defining the ideology of the 19th century South as it existed […]

“Grandpap”, General Ewell, cousin George, and a bigger story

August 24, 2013 by

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Not long ago, while perusing the papers of Confederate civilians in Fold3, I dropped in the names of some relatives in the Valley, just to see what I might find. For starters, I found that my third great grandfather, William M. Dorraugh, was of help to Gen. Richard S. Ewell. It was a small thing, […]

Rolling the clock back just a little further

July 12, 2013 by

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Alright, let’s depart the Sesqui train just for a bit. Forget “150 years ago” for the moment. Let’s think something more along the lines of… 212 years. Let’s even be specific… November 10, 1801. So far, this year (1801), John Marshall was appointed US chief justice; the electoral tie between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr […]

Who was this Capt. Summers who fell at White House Farm?

July 9, 2013 by

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I first encountered a reference to Capt. Summers (see yesterday’s post in which I mention his death) when I was looking into the names of the different G.A.R. posts in this general area. It so happens that George D. Summers Post No. 13 was out of Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. There is, by the way, […]

White House Farm and the death of Capt. Summers

July 7, 2013 by

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Just the other day, I was driving in search of a location which has significance in relation to the Confederate retreat from Gettysburg. I found it, and then (being who I am) ventured… or strayed… along the old Charles Town Pike, toward Summit Point and Charles Town. I think my curiosity proved rewarding, as I […]

“Grace”

July 3, 2013 by

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Today marks the fourth and final day for my Gettysburg Sesqui experience. I’ve seen many sites, making a point of it, to the best of my ability, to be at sites where my kin were involved in the horrors of the battle. For example, last night, I stood on East Cemetery Hill, where my kin […]

Gettysburg and the Centennial… that begins in a couple of days

June 29, 2013 by

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You didn’t read that wrong. People, I think, just tend to forget. The Sesqui overshadows the fact that this coming week is also the Centennial for the tremendous reunion that took place in 1913. There’s nothing wrong with that… it’s just the way it is. I’ll be heading out on Monday morning with two objectives… […]

Reconsidering 2nd Winchester

June 13, 2013 by

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It might be hard to believe, but a decade ago, I probably wouldn’t have given it a second thought. Back then, it was clear to me… the Shenandoah Valley was Confederate and, any effort made by Confederates here was to rid “Yankees” from it. The understanding being that “Yankees” meant anyone who came in, from […]

Heading home… without knowing it.

June 12, 2013 by

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As we continue to move forward to the Sesquicentennial of Gettysburg, I’m also reminded… for whatever reason, why today, I have no clue… that there were also soldiers from Gettysburg, heading home… though, at this point, 150 years ago… that wasn’t what they were thinking. I realize there was more than just one company of […]

My people at Brandy Station

June 9, 2013 by

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… and in my family tree, I can count a fair number who were there… more so in gray than in blue, but represented in two Virginia (7th and 35th) units and one from Pennsylvania (3rd).  Those in the 7th Virginia Regiment and 35th Battalion Virginia Cavalry bore witness to the opening of the battle. […]

Who was free black Isaac Dunn?

May 8, 2013 by

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There are certain things that sit there… in my mind… unanswered in my quest to understand better my ancestors and the people around them… and this is one of them. He appears but once, as far as I can tell, in the census records. Isaac Dunn was listed, on September 6, 1860, as residing with […]

For the memory of an uncle she never knew

May 2, 2013 by

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It’s a major reason why I’m headed to Chancellorsville in just under six hours. I can list all my relatives in the 10th Virginia, the 33rd Virginia, and the Purcell Artillery who were there, fighting, on May 3, 1863. I can also list my relatives in the 7th West Virginia Infantry who were there, fighting, […]