Browsing All Posts filed under »Re-inventing CW memory«

“I don’t think there were really that many”

July 13, 2012 by

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Not so much a matter of content delivery this morning, and more about a thought that’s been lingering with me for a bit… About a month ago, a friend of mine attended a reenactment, here in the Valley (the Cross Keys/Port Republic event held on… the Cedar Creek battlefield). When he had an opportunity to talk […]

The war from within… contemporary Southerners reflecting on the Civil War… sans Lost Cause

April 26, 2012 by

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I don’t delve into these things like I used to do, usually because I find the time spent equates to wasted time, and really, I have little patience (and thus, I will officially issue a word of warning when it comes to commenting on this post) for dealing with the responses typical of many modern Confederate advocates (which, […]

Ghost-busting on the Opequon battlefield

February 4, 2012 by

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O.K., well, not really… but… As I’ve been gearing-up for my relocation to the Winchester area, I’ve been taking more interest in the rather obscure details of local history there, and… this certainly caught my eyes just a couple of weeks ago… I’ll admit… tough to read as a screen capture, so here’s the transcribed […]

“they’re not strangers… and they stay as they lay…”

September 13, 2011 by

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There’s something that struck me long ago, while watching Last of the Mohicans (the newest version), but not necessarily in relation to that time period. Specifically, I’m talking about the marking or remarking of graves of Civil War soldiers. We see it often, in instances where folks, today, wish to mark the graves of people […]

The Long Shadow of Lee Reaches… the Navy?

April 24, 2011 by

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At yesterday’s Civil War at Sea Symposium, our host called the audience’s attention to this recruiting poster: So Robert, you’re the naval expert here…. what’s up with this? It is a World War II era recruiting poster.  Our host pointed out the poster lacks any official US government attributes or stamps, normally seen on Navy […]

An observation – Civil War in Virginia Month… chirp, chirp chirp…

April 2, 2011 by

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Today IS April 2, and that chirping would be the sound of crickets in the absence of a proclamation, as yet, by Governor Bob McDonnell. Yet, despite the proposed redirection toward a “Civil War in Virginia Month” (formerly known as Confederate History Month/CHM), the CHM recognition continues by many who are inclined to continue in […]

Were Virginia’s Confederate Reserves a smokescreen of deception?

March 23, 2011 by

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I’m really jumping the gun here, because I should be holding this story in reserve (sure, why not… pun intended) until 2014… marking the 150th anniversary of the establishment of Virginia’s Confederate reserve units. Still, I brought it up the other day (in “WYSIWYG Confederates?”) , so I figured that I would pick-up from where […]

It was All About Taxes…

March 21, 2011 by

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There is a TV spot discussing the causes of the Civil War recently introduced in some localities.   The Georgia Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans created the ad and it is one of twelve running.  Thus far the only place I’ve seen a web copy of the ad is on Facebook (here).  While those […]

WYSIWYG Confederates?

March 20, 2011 by

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Pardon the silence for the last week. A few unavoidable matters over the past week set posting back a bit, but let me see if I can get things moving once again… What are WYSIWYG Confederates? Well, in Web development, WYSIWYG is an acronym for “What you see is what you get”, and, in some […]

“The victor gets to write the history …”

March 2, 2011 by

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So explain this: Why is it “Stonewall Jackson taught us what the pause that refreshes really was”?   Why not have a painting of Uncle Billy giving the boys a pause somewhere near Atlanta (the home of Coca-Cola, BTW) in between barn burnings? After all the victor gets to write the history….

Moving beyond the factoids of the Civil War

February 7, 2011 by

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I look for them everyday… factoids that pop-up on Twitter. There are a number of folks who post daily, providing us with blow-by-blow details about events as they happened 150 years ago. Some of these folks provide factoids such as “so-and-so (someone significant in the Civil War) was born this day”, or “this happened today”… […]

Newspapers that reveal something new to popular memory of the Civil War… perhaps…

February 6, 2011 by

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Once again (as can be seen in my post from Friday), I’ve been perusing the Valley of the Shadow site. My focus in that post on Friday was on the two papers in Staunton, Virginia, at this particular time (the first week of February), 150 years ago. One of those papers happened to support secession, […]

Recent reenactments and the media

January 23, 2011 by

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We’ve seen a couple reenactments lately, and they haven’t been reenactments of battles. The slave auction reenactment, I think, was high impact. It continues to make an impression on YouTube, but honestly, there are a couple of videos available, and the best is one (=>see a post from a few days ago, in which I […]

Union veterans in postwar reconciliation… giving up ground won?

January 1, 2011 by

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Keith Harris has an interesting post up today, discussing how G.A.R. members saw Robert E. Lee in postwar remembrance. Between this and their reaction toward the return of Confederate battleflags, one would think that, though interested in participating in gestures of reconciliation, Union veterans were unwilling to give up ground gained so easily forget the […]

On the notion that emancipation would eventually come in a free and independent Southern Confederacy

December 12, 2010 by

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With the title of this post in mind… this editorial comes from the Staunton Vindicator, December 14, 1860 (courtesy the Valley of the Shadow site). Now, I realize, as an editorial, it is, or may be, just one man’s opinion, but, there appear to be reflections of the attitudes of others. I’ve placed emphasis in […]

How all Northerners “then” weren’t really so out of touch with “being Southern”

November 14, 2010 by

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It’s bad enough to hear some contemporary Southerners speak of Northerners as if it was still the time of the Civil War, but it’s even worse to hear Southerners speak of the people of the North from the time of the war, as if they could not, in the least bit, identify with the culture […]

It’s 1860. Who do you vote for?

November 2, 2010 by

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Not the exact date, but today is election day… and on election day 150 years ago, in 1860, a good deal was at stake. So, who do you vote for? Strike that… who would get your ancestors’ votes? Lincoln, Douglas, Breckinridge, or Bell… and why? Without looking, do you know their platforms? After all, a […]

Reflections…

October 17, 2010 by

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Ah, Sunday morning… a fire is in the wood-stove to cut the morning chill, a warm cup of coffee sits nearby as I sit down to transcribe more of Strother’s recollections for appearance here later this afternoon. As I do so, I wonder why so many are more fascinated with the events on the battlefields […]

… and they were all Southern, alike.

September 21, 2010 by

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I’ve said it before… the South does not equal the Confederacy. In fact, Southerness in general is not a reflection of the Confederacy. Southerness existed before the Confederacy… Southerness was and is the culture. Modern Confederateness, on the other hand, is a culture unto itself and is not to be confused as dominant over Southerness, […]

Confabulation

September 17, 2010 by

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* Time for a guest post by Craig Swain. I’ve been looking forward to this one since Craig tossed the idea at me. He offers some good points about problems with historical memory, and especially Lost Cause as remembered today by folks who don’t have “memory” of then. As I’ve mentioned a few times… too […]

Organizational affiliated Confederate veterans vice non-organizational Confederate vets

August 19, 2010 by

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I’ve often wondered just what percentage of Confederate veterans actually belonged to organizations such as the U.C.V. More importantly, just how many did not… and why? I know there were some vets who didn’t think much of reunions with their former adversaries (though I cannot recall, at this time, in what sources I’ve seen this […]

Imagined “memory” vs. Realized/actual memory

August 18, 2010 by

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Somewhere in my diminished amount of free time lately, I’ve spent some time investigating the realized/actual memory of Southerners at the time of WW1 and even during the Spanish-American War, and all I can say at this point is that it baffles me when it comes to some, today, who suggest that their comments/”position” are/is […]

The Southern connection between WW1 and the Civil War

August 14, 2010 by

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Sure, the circumstances were different… 1861 and 1918 were different times. But were people really all that different? Consider this… if we don’t take time to consider the complicating factors behind how men became part of the two armies (Confederate and the AEF), then it becomes convenient… even easy to reflect merely on numbers and […]

“Hell no, our kids won’t go!”

July 30, 2010 by

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I was going to post another installment of D.H. Strother’s “Recollections” today, but will hold off till tomorrow. I saw something posted by David over at Inconvenient South that caught my eye. David cites an article (from The Journal of American History, and written by Jeanette Keith) published in 2001 focused on Southern draft resistance […]