Browsing All Posts filed under »Civil War Memory – General«

“It is a good time of the day”: Antietam

September 16, 2012 by

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I’ve stopped briefly, after my walk from the Visitor’s Center to the Bloody Lane tower. Part of me considers the civilians on this day, 150 years ago… their concerns of what might yet come. Part of me considers relatives in gray, on the next day, near Dunker Church… Part of me considers relatives in blue, […]

Hurrah, for Thomas Walter! A Sesqui reflection.

September 15, 2012 by

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I had hoped to have this posted on the anniversary of the event, but six days later… can’t be too bad with a “live” blog post from the actual site! So… 150 years ago, six days ago… Thomas Walter saved what is one of the most attractive features of the old C&O Canal… the Monocacy […]

Catching-up: day 3 of the Harpers Ferry-Antietam Sesqui weekend

September 15, 2012 by

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Finding myself adequately worn-out after the hike up Maryland Heights, on Thursday… and then the “breakout” tour in Harpers Ferry, last night, I haven’t been able to keep pace with blog posts. So, drafting a hasty one before heading out this morning. It’s been great so far. The hike up Maryland Heights… with a friend/co-worker […]

The alarm goes out in Clear Spring, 150 years ago today

September 10, 2012 by

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Following-up on my post from Saturday, I look back again at the village of Clear Spring. I have nothing to show how my ancestors felt… there and in nearby Four Locks. Instead, I rely on what is available… not so much as a reflection of what they also felt, but to add another dimension to the […]

Across the Potomac and into Maryland

September 7, 2012 by

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It’s where my mind has been for the past few days… Since September 4th, I’ve been thinking about the Confederates crossing the Potomac and moving into Maryland, and how long the news might have taken to reach my family members, just to the west of Hagerstown. My third great grandmother Kate Moore lived near Four […]

An ironic newspaper ad

September 3, 2012 by

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But more from our vantage point, and not from those who read it at the time… This is from the September 3, 1862 edition of Hagerstown’s newspaper… 150 years ago today. Now, I guess it seems more ironic because of 1) Hagerstown’s proximity to Sharpsburg/Antietam… and 2) the fact that, in just 14 days, the […]

Maryland’s “Treason Law” of 1862 & the “sharp tune” it played between a Southern Unionist and his Confederate son

September 2, 2012 by

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I’m a little late on this one, and had intended to post something about it in March, when on or near the actual Sesqui anniversary, but… better late than never, I suppose. On top of that, having a severe hankering for western Maryland-related content (it’s been quite a while since I last posted anything about […]

John Albert Racer of Page County… Southern Unionist?

September 2, 2012 by

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A friend of mine asked me if I thought his ancestor (John Albert Racer) might have been a Southern Unionist. He has a hunch he was, plus, there’s some pretty interesting stuff surrounding this fellow’s life in the war. For one, there’s a pretty cool story that comes out of Page County, about one of […]

Reflections on the Brawner Farm

August 28, 2012 by

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It’s usually not my practice to post things without giving them much thought (at least from what you, the reader can see in my words here… but I’m surely giving it thought “off-paper” or, considering the platform… “off-web”), but… in that this is almost 150 years to the hour since it began, this evening my […]

Our National Parks

August 20, 2012 by

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A story hit today that is painful to read… the National Park Service is set to get the ax once again. Now, this really isn’t a surprise, because many have seen the writing on the wall for quite some time, but to see it in print is a painful reminder. The strange part of this […]

“You must choose & choose at once.”

August 15, 2012 by

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Back, just an hour or so ago, from a pleasant evening drive… prompted by the writing of this post. I realized that the Southern Unionist at the center of this post rests in a cemetery not terribly far from my home. So, I ventured out… and visited Daniel and Mary Brindle. Daniel was Pennsylvania-born, but […]

Telling the story of the Civil War: The Joseph’s Coat* approach

August 10, 2012 by

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Over at Emerging Civil War, Kathleen Logothetis posted something today (Let’s Talk Openly About Slavery: Interpretation at Monticello) that caught my attention and made me think a little more about what might be considered a challenge in telling the story of the Civil War. Not that it’s difficult to weave together the topic of slavery with the Civil War… that’s […]

Prewar Harpers Ferry in art… and some thoughts

August 7, 2012 by

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A little something different this evening… While I have my fair share of Troiani battle scenes on my walls, I’m finding myself more drawn to pre-Civil War art these days. It might be that the bigger draw is the humanity… that calm in years before the storm. Sure, they had their own problems, even in […]

Rhetorical approaches to Civil War blogging?

July 31, 2012 by

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Are they obvious… or subtle? I don’t think everyone has a point to make… unless, of course, you also want to consider straight-out information distribution as a way to convince others that the Civil War and/or particular aspects of it ARE important. In that case, yes… there is rhetoric involved, to some degree. But, how much […]

I am a beneficiary of hard war

July 30, 2012 by

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I don’t know, but it seems to sound about as silly as saying “I’m a victim of Sherman… or Sheridan… or fill-in name here. So let me try the “victim” angle again. Instead of “victim”, how about refering to oneself as… “One who suffers the long-term ill-effects that the war laid upon my poor departed kin-folk, so […]

Von Steinwehr comes to Luray

July 26, 2012 by

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Still present in the Shenandoah Valley, Union forces (I can’t help but keep bringing up that Jackson had not cleared the Valley with the battles of Cross Keys and Port Republic) made their presence all-the-more known 150 years ago, over the next few weeks. On July 21, a force (brigade strength) probed toward Luray, and, by […]

… and a little more with Gen. Order No. 11

July 23, 2012 by

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John Pope wasn’t quite done yet… and on this day, 150 years ago, he released another general order of interest… GENERAL ORDERS No. 11. HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA, Washington, July 23, 1862. Commanders of army corps, divisions, brigades, and detached commands will proceed immediately to arrest all disloyal male citizens within their lines or within their […]

No hard feelings among old enemies? – Former Confederates & Southern Unionists

July 19, 2012 by

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I don’t think that such a claim can be made across the board, though I’ve seen evidence to support the thought that some continued to hold bitterness toward those who had proven themselves as Southern Unionists. Even so, for the most part, in my neck o’ the woods of Virginia, I think the evidence (even […]

How do you assess the Southern Confederate soldier & Southern Unionist?

July 15, 2012 by

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It might be a good time to pause, just a bit… I’m in the midst of drafting another blog post about another Southern Unionist claim, and am realizing just how varied the picture is becoming. Granted, I had already been noting how varied the story is. In fact, I had subcategories of subcategories, breaking down […]

“I don’t think there were really that many”

July 13, 2012 by

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Not so much a matter of content delivery this morning, and more about a thought that’s been lingering with me for a bit… About a month ago, a friend of mine attended a reenactment, here in the Valley (the Cross Keys/Port Republic event held on… the Cedar Creek battlefield). When he had an opportunity to talk […]

A Shenandoah Valley man for Lincoln

July 12, 2012 by

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The phrase “Lincoln’s Loyalists” always bothers me. Theoretically, yes, Southern Unionists were Lincoln’s loyalists, but that’s not to say they were all necessarily dedicated to Lincoln. I can imagine, for example, that the slave-holding Unionists remained worried over which way the institution might go under his administration. Still, yes… some really were supporters of Lincoln. […]

What manner of tolerance? – Southern citizens vs. soldiers… blue AND gray

July 10, 2012 by

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There’s something that really strikes me when looking at Southern Claims Commission applications, and that is… how much one can take, and still adhere to the sentiments held prior to situations that can try one’s level of tolerance. Just as an example, among Southern Unionists… they are loyal (or profess to be so, after the fact, when applying for […]

A former slave vouches for the Unionism of his former owner

July 9, 2012 by

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Seeing what I do in discussions among folks regarding Civil War era studies, there can be extreme views regarding slavery. Some lean hard in one direction, talking about how the cruelties of slavery were all fabrications, or very rare. Some lean hard in another direction and talk about the cruelties of slavery, and that, no matter the case, […]

More unraveling of complexities in a family’s story

July 8, 2012 by

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Since the “wires” seem to be hot with stories of Southern Unionism (Craig offered-up yet another story of Southern Unionism just today!)… here comes another meaty morsel which I ran across recently. I don’t recall, exactly, how it came to my attention, but recently, while perusing the Web, I ran into a biographical sketch of […]