Browsing All Posts published on »October, 2008«

What is the South and who is really attacking it?

October 31, 2008 by

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When considering the study of Civil War memory, I read regularly, and with great interest, the stories about Southern culture being under attack. What’s even more interesting is when Southern culture is defined by certain people through Confederate symbology (e.g., the Confederate flag, monuments, heroes, etc.). Is it, therefore, to be assumed that Confederate symbology […]

A Tale for Halloween

October 31, 2008 by

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Among the many stories that I gathered while conducting research for my thesis, there was one that caught my attention for more than one reason. I used a portion of the story for my thesis, as it was useful in documenting the activities of Confederate conscript hunters. The part that I did not use is […]

What “parts” are needed to build the effective digital historian?

October 30, 2008 by

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Thanks to Craig’s comments on my digital history-related post from the other day, I’m starting to mull over a great deal regarding the needs of digital historians. But first, ya gotta love the title of this post… after all, it is Halloween week! Get it, my digital historian/Frankenstein’s monster metaphor?! Ahh, come on… anyway… We’re still on the […]

Stephen Douglas’ Speech at Harrisonburg

October 30, 2008 by

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Realizing that those with dial-up may have a hard time opening the pdf that I mentioned yesterday, I decided to post a transcription of the review of Douglas’ speech as printed in Staunton’s Republican Vindicator on September 7, 1860. Of course, Douglas made the speech at the Court House in Harrisonburg, on Monday, September 3, 1860. […]

The last time a presidential candidate came to Harrisonburg, Virginia

October 29, 2008 by

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I was a bit envious of the jump that the A. Lincoln blog got on me in posting something about the historical significance of Barack Obama’s visit to Harrisonburg, Virginia. If you aren’t aware, the last time a presidential candidate came to Harrisonburg was in 1860, with a visit by Stephen Douglas! In regard to […]

Can “The Burning” in the Shenandoah Valley be considered “total war?”

October 29, 2008 by

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I just read Chris Wehner’s most recent post, American Civil War Educators Teaching Myths, at Blog 4 History, and was particularly interested in the remark about Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. Without a doubt, the devastation left in the wake of Gen. Philip Sheridan’s move through the Valley in late September and early October 1864 was […]

Where did the zeal go for the “new frontier?”

October 28, 2008 by

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Apparently, I need to do some more blog surfing because I missed this post by Mark Grimsley. In a follow-up post, Mark posted Anne Rubin’s presentation that details her “disenchantment” with digital history as it relates to the Civil War. Her “Sherman’s March” project sounds ambitious, but well-worth the effort. Rubin is absolutely on target about the current state […]

Liberal history?… I wonder…

October 27, 2008 by

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Considering the recent exchange over this post in Richard Williams’ blog, I wonder… If working beyond James I. Robertson’s traditionalist approach to the Stonewall Brigade, if an historian dug a little deeper, what might the reaction be if the results of the study proved less than favorable/honorable? What if, for example, someone started examining the motivations of the soldiers in the brigade, […]

A philosophy worth taking to heart

October 26, 2008 by

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Since this is my 101st post, I think it is fitting to take time to reflect on the beginnings of this blog. Before I made the leap into the Civil War blogosphere, I created an annotated bibliography focused on the practice of digital history. From all that I found, one item in particular stuck with me. Writing about potential of history […]

Historial analysis and the example of the Haynes-Beylor Murder

October 25, 2008 by

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I’ll say it again… the Haynes-Beylor story as I first posted it, if I were to have left it alone, could be considered “shock history.” As a stand-alone story, it left many questions that remained unanswered. It would be irresponsible for an historian to leave a story like this, posted without analysis. The investigative work […]

More on the Haynes-Beylor Murder

October 21, 2008 by

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I’m back! Now it’s time to reflect on my post of 3 October. When I posted the story, I was thinking two things. First, as a stand-alone story, how does this tale of the Haynes-Beylor murder compare to the way that some other folks like to tell history. I take, as an example, Cisco’s book, War Crimes Against Southern […]

During the intermission…

October 8, 2008 by

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Don’t worry, there is more coming about the story of the Haynes-Beylor Murder. I’m just a bit tied-up right now in preparing for masters comps. However, in the midst of preparing (and, as I tend to become distracted or, as I sometimes put it “hypertextual in my thoughts”) I have decided to put up somewhat of […]

The Haynes-Beylor Murder

October 3, 2008 by

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Picking up from where I left off with my last post… As I prepared to begin work on my thesis, I began sorting out my “findings” from the newspapers and Southern Unionist claims. Despite all that I already had, there was more to be learned. In fact, I exchanged e-mails with one person who made me aware […]

A story for the day…

October 1, 2008 by

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It’s really interesting (at least I find it interesting, not to mention a little strange), but when I was working up a plan for my thesis (for my M.A. in history), I never expected it to go down the path that findings from research took me. Some would think that the student would have more control, but […]